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a list of photosensitive drugs


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#1 Erika78750

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Posted 16 June 2005 - 03:13 AM

Photoallergic Reaction

chlorothiazide
enoxacin
estrogens
fenofibrate
hydrochlorothiazide
ibuprofen
imipramine
indomethacin
itraconazole
methoxsalen
nalidixic acid
pentobarbital
phenobarbital
piroxicam
promazine
promethazine
psoralens
quinethazone
quinidine
quinine
sulfisoxazole
thioridazine
tolbutamide
trioxsalen

Photosensitivity

acetazolamide
acetohexamide
aldesleukin
allopurinol
alprazolam
amantadine
amiloride
aminosalicylate sodium
amiodarone
amitriptyline
amobarbital
amoxapine
astemizole
atenolol
atorvastatin
atropine sulfate
azathioprine
azithromycin
benazepril
bendroflumethiazide
benzthiazide
benztropine
betaxolol
bisoprolol
brompheniramine
bumetanide
butabarbital
butalbital
captopril
carbamazepine
carisoprodol
carteolol
cefazolin
ceftazidime
celecoxib
cerivastatin
cetirizine
chlorambucil
chlordiazepoxide
chlorhexidine
chloroquine
chlorothiazide
chlorotrianisene
chlorpromazine
chlorpropamide
chlorthalidone
cinoxacin
ciprofloxacin
citalopram
clemastine
clofazimine
clofibrate
clomipramine
clorazepate
clozapine
co-trimoxazole
cromolyn
cyclamate
cyclobenzaprine
cyclothiazide
cyproheptadine
dacarbazine
danazol
dantrolene
dapsone
demeclocycline
desipramine
diazoxide
diclofenac
diflunisal
diltiazem
dimenhydrinate
diphenhydramine
disopyramide
docetaxel
doxepin
doxycycline
enalapril
enoxacin
epoetin alfa
estazolam
estrogens
ethacrynic acid
ethambutol
ethionamide
etodolac
felbamate
fenofibrate
flucytosine
fluorouracil
fluoxetine
fluphenazine
flurbiprofen
flutamide
fluvastatin
fluvoxamine
fosinopril
furazolidone
furosemide
ganciclovir
gentamicin
glimepiride
glipizide
glyburide
glycopyrrolate
gold & gold compounds
grepafloxacin
griseofulvin
haloperidol
heroin
hydralazine
hydrochlorothiazide
hydroflumethiazide
hydroxychloroquine
hydroxyurea
hydroxyzine
ibuprofen
imipramine
indapamide
interferons, alfa
isocarboxazid
isoniazid
isotretinoin
kanamycin
ketoconazole
ketoprofen
lamotrigine
leuprolide
levofloxacin
lincomycin
lisinopril
lomefloxacin
loratadine
losartan
loxapine
maprotiline
meclizine
meclofenamate
medroxyprogesterone
mefenamic acid
meprobamate
mercaptopurine
mesalamine
mesoridazine
metformin
methazolamide
methenamine
methotrexate
methoxsalen
methyclothiazide
methyldopa
methylphenidate
metolazone
minocycline
mirtazapine
mitomycin
moexipril
molindone
nabumetone
nalidixic acid
naproxen
naratriptan
nefazodone
nifedipine
nisoldipine
nitrofurantoin
norfloxacin
nortriptyline
ofloxacin
olanzapine
oral contraceptives
oxytetracycline
paroxetine
pentobarbital
pentosan
pentostatin
perphenazine
phenelzine
phenindamine
phenobarbital
pimozide
piroxicam
polythiazide
pravastatin
procarbazine
prochlorperazine
procyclidine
promazine
promethazine
propranolol
protriptyline
psoralens
pyridoxine
pyrilamine
pyrimethamine
quetiapine
quinacrine
quinapril
quinestrol
quinethazone
quinidine
quinine
ramipril
ranitidine
ribavirin
riluzole
risperidone
ritonavir
rofecoxib
ropinirole
saccharin
saquinavir
scopolamine
selegiline
sertraline
sildenafil
simvastatin
sodium cromoglycate
sparfloxacin
spironolactone
streptomycin
sulfadiazine
sulfadoxine
sulfamethoxazole
sulfasalazine
sulfisoxazole
sulindac
sumatriptan
tacrolimus
terbinafine
terfenadine
tetracycline
thioguanine
thioridazine
thiothixene
tiagabine
timolol
tiopronin
tolazamide
tolbutamide
topiramate
torsemide
tranylcypromine
trazodone
triamterene
triazolam
trichlormethiazide
trifluoperazine
trihexyphenidyl
trimeprazine
trimethadione
trimethoprim
trimetrexate
trimipramine
trioxsalen
tripelennamine
triprolidine
trovafloxacin
valproic acid
valsartan
venlafaxine
verapamil
vinblastine
vitamin a
zalcitabine
zaleplon
zolmitriptan
zolpidem

Phototoxic Reaction

acitretin
alprazolam
bendroflumethiazide
captopril
cetirizine
chlorpromazine
ciprofloxacin
demeclocycline
doxycycline
enoxacin
fenofibrate
fluorouracil
fluoxetine
furosemide
grepafloxacin
hydrochlorothiazide
itraconazole
lomefloxacin
methoxsalen
nabumetone
naproxen
norfloxacin
nortriptyline
ofloxacin
oxaprozin
prochlorperazine
promazine
propranolol
protriptyline
psoralens
sparfloxacin
sulfisoxazole
sulindac
terazosin
tetracycline
thioridazine
trioxsalen
vinblastine

* courtesy of
Jerome Z. Litt, M.D.   

Seroquel 25mg
Welburtin SR 100mg 2 tablets twice daily (400mg)
Topamax 150mg
Lunesta 3mg prn
Xanax 1mg prn


BP I, rapid cycling

www.AmericansAgainstNWO.tripod.com


#2 StrungOutOnLife

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Posted 16 June 2005 - 08:25 AM

I took some version of methylphenidate for years, and my Mom has her gold shots. The both of us are so Britishly pale (except for our hair) that I guess we never noticed that.

Edited to add: And I was on imipramine in the second grade, Prozac in the eighth, Luvox for a few days towards the end of ninth grade, Serzone for a few days during the eighth grade, I still take Zyrtec--

Holy crap.

Edited by StrungOutOnLife, 16 June 2005 - 08:30 AM.

Just because some of us can read and write and do a little math, doesn't mean we deserve to conquer the Universe.
--Kurt Vonnegut, Hocus Pocus

Anyone who expects you to "snap out of it" is essentially asking you to perform your own brain surgery via telekinesis.
--Me

#3 Erika78750

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Posted 16 June 2005 - 10:43 AM

yeah it's sickening almost. And benadryl should be on that list too. The exact thing they give you to counteract an allergy actually causes one. Hmmmm
Erika

Seroquel 25mg
Welburtin SR 100mg 2 tablets twice daily (400mg)
Topamax 150mg
Lunesta 3mg prn
Xanax 1mg prn


BP I, rapid cycling

www.AmericansAgainstNWO.tripod.com

#4 kalessin

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Posted 16 June 2005 - 11:23 AM

So that's why I got the sunburn of my life even though I had 45 spf sunblock on...

#5 elfmoogle

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Posted 20 June 2005 - 09:30 PM

What's the difference between all these reactions?  ....I suppose I could just google it, but maybe others would like to know as well.  I'm particularly interested in what a phototoxic reaction is... ;)

Edit: This from http://allergies.abo...a/aa072301a.htm : The symptoms of these two types of reactions vary some. Phototoxic reactions resemble a very bad sunburn on areas of the skin that were directly exposed to the sunlight. They occur anywhere from 30 minutes to several hours after exposure. The reaction might also include erythema, pain, and possibly blisters.

Photoallergic reactions manifest as scaly, itchy rashes which can appear anywhere from one to fourteen days after exposure on exposed areas of the skin, as well as any other parts of the body.


------

So hey, I answered my own question.  Go me.

Edited by elfmoogle, 20 June 2005 - 09:35 PM.


#6 energ

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Posted 20 June 2005 - 10:58 PM

no wonder every monday I come down with a rash.
And i thought I was allergic to work. No- its my phenobarbitol/acetometaphin/caffeine pills.

#7 blackmilk

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Posted 27 June 2005 - 05:38 PM

Benadryl _is_ on the list. It's listed under its generic name, dipenhydramine. As are all of the drugs, as far as I can tell.

Two of my three or so are on there. Sheesh! There goes the summer . . .

K
Every post ends with "Of course, YMMV."

Good luck!

dx: 296.80 - bipolar NOS.
rx: Lithium CR 1525mg 1x p.m. (blood level 0.8-1.0)
     Lamictal 150mg 1x a.m.
  Inderal 10mg 1x a.m.
     . . . unfortunately, no more Wellbutrin XL *allergic reaction hell*

#8 ChemistryExperiment

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Posted 27 June 2005 - 08:36 PM

Thanks for the list its really interesting and useful.

Life isn't about finding yourself

its about CREATING yourself

----------------------------------------------------------

if you're crazy and you know it clap your hands!

*clap*

*clap*

#9 olga

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Posted 27 June 2005 - 10:20 PM

......and for the middle-aged crowd, our blood-pressure meds are on the list.  Oh well, I'm too fat to get into a bathing suit anyway.

sigh.

I'm bossy, opinionated, and over 60, so be prepared for advice if you post a question. However, I am not a medical professional, so please consult a doctor about your mental health issues and medications.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Do what you want. I don't have time to spend on people who are mentally ill and refuse treatment.


#10 Ophelia

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Posted 27 June 2005 - 10:34 PM

keep all of this in mind, guys... it is sooo important!  I have gotten skin reactions from meds and the sun.  it wasnt an outright reaction, but the combo of my meds (especially one time when I was on a hardcore antibiotic) with a major amount of sun exposure made my skin very hypersensitive... so bad that the eyedrops I use everyday for my contacts all of a sudden caused rash-like marks on my face (where the drops had dripped down my face.  it was horrible and still happens every now and then.  so dont risk it!

"Instant gratification takes too long." ~Carrie Fisher

"You're wrong! I do have feelings. I'm an actress! I have all of them." ~Elise Elliot (Goldie Hawn), 'The First Wives Club'

"The defects and faults of the mind are like wounds in the body. After all imaginable care has been taken to heal them up, still there will be a scar left behind." ~Francois de la Rochefoucauld

"It has been said that time heals all wounds. I do not agree. The wounds remain. In time, the mind, protecting its sanity, covers them with scar tissue, and the pain lessens, but it is never gone." ~Rose Kennedy


#11 olga

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Posted 28 June 2005 - 07:55 AM

Erika:

My PCD is always telling me to check the sources of my information.  Who is Jerome Litt and where did you find the list?  Just curious!!

Thanks-
olga

I'm bossy, opinionated, and over 60, so be prepared for advice if you post a question. However, I am not a medical professional, so please consult a doctor about your mental health issues and medications.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Do what you want. I don't have time to spend on people who are mentally ill and refuse treatment.


#12 rainbow_tears

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Posted 28 June 2005 - 02:28 PM

Thanks for sharing I have printed it out
x
* turn to page 1709 in the DSM book and you will find a listing for :
A SURVIVOR! *

notes: I MUST try and remember to breathe!

Posted Image

#13 FunnyAcresFarmer

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Posted 29 June 2005 - 06:03 PM

Erika:

My PCD is always telling me to check the sources of my information.  Who is Jerome Litt and where did you find the list?  Just curious!!

Thanks-
olga

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Jerome Z. Litt, M.D., is a dermatologist in private practice in Beachwood, Ohio, and is author of Your Skin: From Acne to Zits.

He publishes a lot of books - here is his newest (as far as I know):
1. Drug Eruption Reference Manual

ISBN: 1841844934 - Hardcover - List Price: $199.95
Publisher: CRC Pr Llc - Published Date: 03/10/2005 - Edition: 11 - Hardcover

Author: Jerome Z. Litt



His brother (I think) is a psychologist in Lakewood Ohio that my youngest son went to for years.

(I live in the area is why I know about him)





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