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What's better than Adderall?


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#1 Bumble

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    I wish they hadn't told me that I cannot really fly

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Posted 20 October 2007 - 11:57 PM

After several years of taking Adderall for my inattentive ADD, I finally dumped it because I really didn't tolerate it well and ground my teeth and developed a sniffing tic even on a small dose (10 to 20 mgs. per day). It didn't help substantially with focus either, but it did get me going and I was semi-productive in spite of myself.

Since I went off of the drug, I have been lost. My head found it's way up my ass and has been residing there ever since. Is there another stim out there that any of you have found to be milder in side effects than Adderall???

Thanks,

-- B

and a rock feels no pain. . . and an island, never cries.

Current dx: MDD, ADD (w/o H), Social Anxiety Disorder, mild OCD (some amusing stuff, actually)
Current rx: Lexapro 300mg, PRN Klonopin  .5mg,  Adderall XR 30mg x2

Past dx: I fired Dr Evil so I'm not BP anymore!

Past rx: Prozac, Adderall, Wellbutrin, Cymbalta (yuk), Lamictal(evil), Ritalin

Female, 49 years old.



#2 Velvet Elvis

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Posted 21 October 2007 - 01:00 AM

I found most of them to be less teeth-grindy. Focalin was probably the mellowest. There's also strattera and wellbutrin, as well as the norepinephric TCAs.

De-gnosis: ADD, recurrent depression (or maybe bpII in the guise of such), Asperger's, OCD, social anxiety
Today's Pill Menu: Dexedrine, Wellbutrin (Budeprion), Strattera, Celexa, Risperdal, and clonazepam

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#3 tek

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Posted 22 October 2007 - 11:16 AM

My experience with Provigil was good in terms of absolutely NONE of the speedy side effects. I'll admit that it doesn't pack the same "push" as the amphetamines, but it still has some advantages and it certainly does the job better than no med at all. You might ask your doc about it, and inquire about a sample pack. Beware that Provigil use is still considered off-label for ADD, so your insurance may not pay for it. And, wow, it is EXPENSIVE.

Another suggestion is Vyvanse. It's a newer ADD amphetamine stimulant drug, seemingly marketed towards school-age children due to smoother and longer-lasting effects compared to other stimulants, and once-a-day dosing. Also, the word on the street is that it is much milder in the speedy side effect department than other stimulants on the market. My pdoc has a few patients on it that love it, so I may even give it a shot some day soon (I currently take Adderall IR, with a lack of smoothness as the primary complaint).

Edited by tek, 22 October 2007 - 11:17 AM.

REMISSION FOR THE WIN!!!!

Dx: ADD, recurring major depression (w/ anxiety), initial insomnia
...CSMS (chronic shitty mood syndrome), BHLFBBM (bad habits learned from bipolar borderline mom)

Crap down the trap: Lamictal 200mg, Wellbutrin XL 300mg, Provigil 200mg, Ativan 0.5 mg BID, Seroquel 50-100mg bedtime

Ex-Rx: Adderall XR, Adderall IR, Lexapro, Prozac, Effexor XR, Abilify, Risperdal, Ambien, Klonopin, Lunesta, Propranolol, Kephlex, Bactrim






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