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#1 thymeandspace

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 04:29 PM

I'm new to crazy boards and thought I'd try posting a topic a little less depressing than the rest.
Alot of you seem to have problems with nightmares or maybe living in what you consider a bleak reality.
I think I have your answer.
Lucid dreaming is just about the most incredible thing ever. I started experiencing it very recently and I already know this is something I want for the rest of my life.
They are also really good for getting rid of nightmares. You face them head on, which at first is the epitome of your fear, but once you look your own fear in the face, its not so scary anymore. It's beautiful, really.
Has anyone here gotten good at lucid dreaming?
Current Dx: Manic depressive
Rx: me, myself, and I

In the midst of my insanity
I get moments of lucidity
Where I am dazzled by the madness
In which I am entrenched


#2 NullChamber

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 04:33 PM

it's probably a great remedy for night terrors. now if id only start reading that "exploring the world of lucid dreaming" book..

Edited by NullChamber, 10 March 2012 - 04:33 PM.

Dx: Anxiety d/o NOS, Psychosis NOS. had unilateral and bilateral ECT

Rx: Prozac 20 mg, Latuda 20 mg, Inderal LA 60 mg, Klonopin 1 mg
Additionally: Vitamin B-complex supplement, Vitamin E, Vitamin C, Vitamin B12, Folate, Co-Q10, DHA
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#3 thymeandspace

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 04:37 PM

it's probably a great remedy for night terrors. now if id only start reading that "exploring the world of lucid dreaming" book..

Not only that, its good for anyone who wants to free run like in assasins creed, or jump off a mountain and fly all the way down knowing you wont get hurt, or shapeshifting and anything else imaginable
Current Dx: Manic depressive
Rx: me, myself, and I

In the midst of my insanity
I get moments of lucidity
Where I am dazzled by the madness
In which I am entrenched

#4 Eden

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 04:38 PM

I actually started exploring lucid dreaming in my early teens if not earlier, though I wasn't aware of what it was. I only remember waking up scared once when I was very young, since then I have observed my dreams but never been emotionally affected in any way. I'm woken up after some very disturbing and horrible dreams feeling like I just watched a cheesy horror flick.

It's actually an interesting point.

New Dx: Psychosis NOS, MDD + Aspergers and ADHD Inattentive type w/ social anxiety.
Also: Celiac disease and chronic 'flavor of the week' insomnia.

-Scratch that, uncle Sam gave me a clean bill of health cuz I talk gud n stuff.

 

"Mankind are a herd of knaves and fools.
It is necessary to join the crowd, or get out of their way,
in order not to be trampled to death by them" William Hazlitt.


One does not simply walk into dictionary.


#5 thymeandspace

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 04:43 PM

I actually started exploring lucid dreaming in my early teens if not earlier, though I wasn't aware of what it was. I only remember waking up scared once when I was very young, since then I have observed my dreams but never been emotionally affected in any way. I'm woken up after some very disturbing and horrible dreams feeling like I just watched a cheesy horror flick.

It's actually an interesting point.


thats awesome. did you ever try controlling them?
Current Dx: Manic depressive
Rx: me, myself, and I

In the midst of my insanity
I get moments of lucidity
Where I am dazzled by the madness
In which I am entrenched

#6 Eden

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 04:45 PM

I never researched the topic in any real fashion, so I don't actively practice, it's just something I stumbled across in the pre-crazy years as a coping mechanism. I do often control them subconsciously, but I don't work to, nor do I really think about it. It's just been something I've done since I was little and feels natural.

Edited by Eden, 10 March 2012 - 04:46 PM.

New Dx: Psychosis NOS, MDD + Aspergers and ADHD Inattentive type w/ social anxiety.
Also: Celiac disease and chronic 'flavor of the week' insomnia.

-Scratch that, uncle Sam gave me a clean bill of health cuz I talk gud n stuff.

 

"Mankind are a herd of knaves and fools.
It is necessary to join the crowd, or get out of their way,
in order not to be trampled to death by them" William Hazlitt.


One does not simply walk into dictionary.


#7 thymeandspace

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 05:06 PM

I never researched the topic in any real fashion, so I don't actively practice, it's just something I stumbled across in the pre-crazy years as a coping mechanism. I do often control them subconsciously, but I don't work to, nor do I really think about it. It's just been something I've done since I was little and feels natural.

well, coming from someone who works her ass off to lucid dream, you have an incredible skill/gift and im envious.
i recommend trying it out- you can use it for virtually anything from pure recreation to practicing social situations and getting over fears.
Current Dx: Manic depressive
Rx: me, myself, and I

In the midst of my insanity
I get moments of lucidity
Where I am dazzled by the madness
In which I am entrenched

#8 Eden

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 05:08 PM

I don't know about all that, I have had lucid dreams where I was normal, happy and not anxious. It's easy to pretend, reality is far more harsh.

New Dx: Psychosis NOS, MDD + Aspergers and ADHD Inattentive type w/ social anxiety.
Also: Celiac disease and chronic 'flavor of the week' insomnia.

-Scratch that, uncle Sam gave me a clean bill of health cuz I talk gud n stuff.

 

"Mankind are a herd of knaves and fools.
It is necessary to join the crowd, or get out of their way,
in order not to be trampled to death by them" William Hazlitt.


One does not simply walk into dictionary.


#9 thymeandspace

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 05:15 PM

   :D


Edited by thymeandspace, 24 March 2013 - 11:36 PM.

Current Dx: Manic depressive
Rx: me, myself, and I

In the midst of my insanity
I get moments of lucidity
Where I am dazzled by the madness
In which I am entrenched

#10 Birdee

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 08:36 PM

Interesting topic. Chronic nightmare sufferer here. I stumbled on some info about lucid dreaming by accident and read that you can take some control over the dream outcome. So I kinda tucked that info into my internal "to do" list.

I've had a couple of lucid dreams since then. The first lucid dream… I was still frozen in sleep paralysis. Just couldn't break thru. But the next one I was able to interact in… just a little. It was scary… but I haven't had a nightmare since then. Weird.

That was only a couple of months ago. And while I'm not looking forward to "facing my fears"… I know now that I can. And am prepared to do so.

I think it'd be really cool to be able to have lucid dreams at will… but the good kind like you've talked about. One question I have about lucid dreaming is this…. If you're semi-concious during a lucid dream… is your body getting the right kind of restful sleep? Do you wake up tired or energized?

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#11 saoirse

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 08:44 PM

Almost all of my dreams are lucid dreams. :/ I think it can sometimes take the fun out of it, because when awesome things happen I always know I'm just dreaming it. However, it also means I get to do wonderful things in my dreams, such as explore old abandoned cities and pick my way through enchanted mazes and that kind of stuff.

... If I'm even getting the definition right. Is lucid dreaming when you know you're dreaming and can control your actions? My dreams have always been like this. Now that you mention it, it is kind of cool. I thought everyone dreamed the same way.
dx's: Bipolar I w/ psychosis, anxiety
meds: 1500 mg trileptal, 600 mg lithium, 4 mg risperidone

"but i don't want to go among mad people," alice remarked.
"oh you can't help that," said the Cat. "we're all mad here. i'm mad. you're mad."
"how do you know i'm mad?" said alice.
"you must be," said the Cat, "or you wouldn't have come here."

#12 Eden

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 08:50 PM

Almost all of my dreams are lucid dreams. :/ I think it can sometimes take the fun out of it, because when awesome things happen I always know I'm just dreaming it. However, it also means I get to do wonderful things in my dreams, such as explore old abandoned cities and pick my way through enchanted mazes and that kind of stuff.

... If I'm even getting the definition right. Is lucid dreaming when you know you're dreaming and can control your actions? My dreams have always been like this. Now that you mention it, it is kind of cool. I thought everyone dreamed the same way.


Generally dreaming is considered a function of the subconscious, out of your control.

New Dx: Psychosis NOS, MDD + Aspergers and ADHD Inattentive type w/ social anxiety.
Also: Celiac disease and chronic 'flavor of the week' insomnia.

-Scratch that, uncle Sam gave me a clean bill of health cuz I talk gud n stuff.

 

"Mankind are a herd of knaves and fools.
It is necessary to join the crowd, or get out of their way,
in order not to be trampled to death by them" William Hazlitt.


One does not simply walk into dictionary.


#13 thymeandspace

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 08:26 PM

Interesting topic. Chronic nightmare sufferer here. I stumbled on some info about lucid dreaming by accident and read that you can take some control over the dream outcome. So I kinda tucked that info into my internal "to do" list.

I've had a couple of lucid dreams since then. The first lucid dream… I was still frozen in sleep paralysis. Just couldn't break thru. But the next one I was able to interact in… just a little. It was scary… but I haven't had a nightmare since then. Weird.

That was only a couple of months ago. And while I'm not looking forward to "facing my fears"… I know now that I can. And am prepared to do so.

I think it'd be really cool to be able to have lucid dreams at will… but the good kind like you've talked about. One question I have about lucid dreaming is this…. If you're semi-concious during a lucid dream… is your body getting the right kind of restful sleep? Do you wake up tired or energized?


I had the same lucid dream once, where i was frozen in sleep paralysis but my eyes were open. that one was particularly frightening because i kept losing my grip on reality and i would start believing that i was paralyzed for the rest of my life haha...

there are a few different techniques that will help induce lucid dreaming, but it sounds like you naturally have a hold on the art. your so lucky! i have 4 alarms set every night so i can wake up right after a REM cycle and remember the dream i was just in.

the curious thing about dreams is how unknown and unstudied they are. scientists arent even sure what their function is. however, from my experience, when i achieve lucidity within a dream i wake up invigorated. the thought of me wandering around my own mental construct results in a sort of mash of realities, where one is just as real as the other.
Current Dx: Manic depressive
Rx: me, myself, and I

In the midst of my insanity
I get moments of lucidity
Where I am dazzled by the madness
In which I am entrenched

#14 thymeandspace

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 08:29 PM

Almost all of my dreams are lucid dreams. :/ I think it can sometimes take the fun out of it, because when awesome things happen I always know I'm just dreaming it. However, it also means I get to do wonderful things in my dreams, such as explore old abandoned cities and pick my way through enchanted mazes and that kind of stuff.

... If I'm even getting the definition right. Is lucid dreaming when you know you're dreaming and can control your actions? My dreams have always been like this. Now that you mention it, it is kind of cool. I thought everyone dreamed the same way.


thats so awesome. i have to work my ass of to have and remember my lucid dreams. your definition of lucid dreaming is correct, but not entirely. there are types of lucid dreams you can have while not knowing you are dreaming, such as after being sleep deprived for some time. how much control do you have in your dreams? how many do u remember a night, on average? how vivid are they?
if ya dont mind me askin :)
Current Dx: Manic depressive
Rx: me, myself, and I

In the midst of my insanity
I get moments of lucidity
Where I am dazzled by the madness
In which I am entrenched

#15 saoirse

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 01:25 PM

thats so awesome. i have to work my ass of to have and remember my lucid dreams. your definition of lucid dreaming is correct, but not entirely. there are types of lucid dreams you can have while not knowing you are dreaming, such as after being sleep deprived for some time. how much control do you have in your dreams? how many do u remember a night, on average? how vivid are they?
if ya dont mind me askin :)


My amount of control varies. Most of the time, I can only control myself, not outward events (ie: I will decide to go into a room, or explore something, or speak to someone.) Other times, I can make things happen -- and these are the BEST dreams. If I want to fly, I will grow wings. If I want to have a sexual experience with someone in my dream ( ^_^ ) they will be there. If I want to go on a magical journey, I can decide what the background will be like and what kind of people I will meet. The dreams where I can control things other than myself are amazing, blissful. Pure joy that I can't touch while awake.

I haven't had as many since my sleeping has become disrupted lately. I used to have them about 4 times a week and now it's less. They are almost always still lucid (where I know that I'm dreaming) but I have less control. It's annoying. I miss being able to make decisions and go on adventures.

My lucid dreams are always extremely vivid. I wake up swamped in bliss, mostly. They recur a lot. I still have a recurring dream where I explore an abandoned city underneath a museum that has been going on since I was 9 or 10, it comes back every few years.

My non-lucid dreams are not as vivid :( And they're nowhere near as euphoric. Since my sleep is all screwed up, I've been having more of these lately. It sucks. Or I just don't remember my dreams at all.

Bah, I wrote a novel. Anyway, thank you for this thread. It's very interesting. I've never thought about my dreams so much.

Edited by saoirse, 12 March 2012 - 01:27 PM.

dx's: Bipolar I w/ psychosis, anxiety
meds: 1500 mg trileptal, 600 mg lithium, 4 mg risperidone

"but i don't want to go among mad people," alice remarked.
"oh you can't help that," said the Cat. "we're all mad here. i'm mad. you're mad."
"how do you know i'm mad?" said alice.
"you must be," said the Cat, "or you wouldn't have come here."

#16 crtclms

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 07:49 PM

I am a lucid dreamer, and have a couple of lucid dreams a week. I can control what I do, but when I am having a nightmare, all I want to do is end the nightmare. Not so easy. I have tried prying my eyes open (at least in my dream), jumping off of cliffs or high buildings hoping that by killing myself, I will wake up (doesn't work, by the way). I can't trick myself awake.

Sometimes I walk into the living room looking for my husband to wake me up, and usually he has turned into something bizarre, like a man with a dog's head.

I also have confronted aliens (even remembering that dream makes me really uncomfortable), and found a place to hide, because I knew the building I was in (my college dorm), and it was a hiding place we used in college.

Most of them are nightmares, as you can kind of guess. But even though I can direct action, I can't wake myself up.

Dx: Bipolar 1; GAD; Migraine w/ Aura; Migraine w/o Aura; Renal Tubular Acidosis (caused by Zonegran); Status Migrainosus
Rx: Alprazolam; Botox; Buproprion; Dihydroergotomine via IV Infusion; Flexeril; Lamotrigine; Latuda; Lithium; Metoclopramide; Midrin; Migranal; Potassium Citrate; Prilosec; Promethazine; Riboflavin; Tizanidine; Verapamil; Vitamin D3
Currently Shelved: Abilify; Amerge; Anaprox; Atenolol; Buspar; Cafergot; Cymbalta; Depakote; Di-Hydro-ergotamine, injected; Gabapentin; Geodon; Imitrex Tablets; Klonopin; Maxalt; Namenda; Nortriptyline; Norvasc; Propranolol; Prozac; Risperidone; Relpax; Sansert; Sumatriptan injectables; Tegretol; Trazadone; Zoloft; Zolpidem; Zomig; Zonegran


Affectations can be dangerous. -Gertrude Stein

 

I moderate Bipolar, Panic/Anxiety, Dissociative Disorders, Migraine, Seizures, Not Otherwise Specified, Anticonvulsants, Side Effects, Family Feud, and I Still Have Issues. Remember, I am not a medical professional. PM me if you have any questions


#17 thymeandspace

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 04:54 PM

I am a lucid dreamer, and have a couple of lucid dreams a week. I can control what I do, but when I am having a nightmare, all I want to do is end the nightmare. Not so easy. I have tried prying my eyes open (at least in my dream), jumping off of cliffs or high buildings hoping that by killing myself, I will wake up (doesn't work, by the way). I can't trick myself awake.

Sometimes I walk into the living room looking for my husband to wake me up, and usually he has turned into something bizarre, like a man with a dog's head.

I also have confronted aliens (even remembering that dream makes me really uncomfortable), and found a place to hide, because I knew the building I was in (my college dorm), and it was a hiding place we used in college.

Most of them are nightmares, as you can kind of guess. But even though I can direct action, I can't wake myself up.


dreams are a trip. part of the reason you cant wake yourself up is because in the back of your head, you believe you won't be able to.
heres some advice for you:
once I realize Im in a dream, I do what I can to make sure I don't wake up out of it. To do this, I move around in my dream. I create the sensation of movement so that my body doesn;t realize it's actually just laying in bed.
so for someone (like you) trying to wake up, stand in one spot and completely stop all movement within your dream. realize that your actual body is in sleep paralysis laying on your bed. this should wake you up.
Current Dx: Manic depressive
Rx: me, myself, and I

In the midst of my insanity
I get moments of lucidity
Where I am dazzled by the madness
In which I am entrenched

#18 crtclms

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 01:17 AM

What? That makes absolutely zero sense. You yourself say you haven't ever wanted a lucid dream to end, so how do you know what will work to end them?

You say your ability to dream lucidly is a recent development. I have been having lucid dreams since I was a teenager (i.e., 30 years ago). But thanks for the tips.

I don't know where you got the "sleep paralysis theory" from.

Dx: Bipolar 1; GAD; Migraine w/ Aura; Migraine w/o Aura; Renal Tubular Acidosis (caused by Zonegran); Status Migrainosus
Rx: Alprazolam; Botox; Buproprion; Dihydroergotomine via IV Infusion; Flexeril; Lamotrigine; Latuda; Lithium; Metoclopramide; Midrin; Migranal; Potassium Citrate; Prilosec; Promethazine; Riboflavin; Tizanidine; Verapamil; Vitamin D3
Currently Shelved: Abilify; Amerge; Anaprox; Atenolol; Buspar; Cafergot; Cymbalta; Depakote; Di-Hydro-ergotamine, injected; Gabapentin; Geodon; Imitrex Tablets; Klonopin; Maxalt; Namenda; Nortriptyline; Norvasc; Propranolol; Prozac; Risperidone; Relpax; Sansert; Sumatriptan injectables; Tegretol; Trazadone; Zoloft; Zolpidem; Zomig; Zonegran


Affectations can be dangerous. -Gertrude Stein

 

I moderate Bipolar, Panic/Anxiety, Dissociative Disorders, Migraine, Seizures, Not Otherwise Specified, Anticonvulsants, Side Effects, Family Feud, and I Still Have Issues. Remember, I am not a medical professional. PM me if you have any questions


#19 Maybell

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 03:04 AM

cool topic. I've had quite a few lucid dreams in my time. When I was younger I had some where I could jump so high that I was practically flying and could change the direction I bounced in to go to different places.

I've also had a few unpleasant ones where I knew I was dreaming and I was desperately trying to wake up but couldn't. Those ones I don't like at all, but they are not frequent. Next time I have one I will try to remember your theory about 'standing still' to see if that helps!

I don't think this is lucid dreaming as such, but I sometimes wake up from a weird dream, then fall asleep again and have a dream where I'm telling someone about my first dream, then I wake up and think "that's weird!" and I fall asleep again and have a dream where I'm telling someone about having a dream that I was telling someone about a dream etc...etc...I also have very vivid yet kinda boring dreams where I'm just doing regular stuff and when I wake up, it's sometimes hard to tell if I actually did the things I dreamed in real life or not (like I'll ask someone a question in my dream, then in real life I can't tell if I actually asked them or not)

Dreams are pretty fascinating stuff :)
“Isolated, she managed somehow to feel free—albeit with a freedom that made her want to smash a hole in the very center of the universe.”

Flora Rheta Schreiber


#20 thymeandspace

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Posted 17 March 2012 - 10:55 PM

What? That makes absolutely zero sense. You yourself say you haven't ever wanted a lucid dream to end, so how do you know what will work to end them?

You say your ability to dream lucidly is a recent development. I have been having lucid dreams since I was a teenager (i.e., 30 years ago). But thanks for the tips.

I don't know where you got the "sleep paralysis theory" from.


haha well i can definitely let you know where i got it from :)
the website is http://www.dreamview...aying-lucid-26/
its pretty much a forum specialized in lucid dreaming. the content on it is read and used by at least thousands of lucid dreaming enthusiasts.
its no problem if you find that to be an unreliable source.. i found the tips really helpful in my experience however.
Current Dx: Manic depressive
Rx: me, myself, and I

In the midst of my insanity
I get moments of lucidity
Where I am dazzled by the madness
In which I am entrenched





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: lucid, dreaming, sleep


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