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Half Awake Half Asleep Can't Move


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#1 neferi

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 02:15 PM

Over the past few weeks I keep having these weird ass dreams, were I try to wake up but I can't it's like i'm half awake half asleep and try to open my eyes but can't and try to move my body and can't at all.  It's like my body is paralyzed or something.

 

Does anybody know why this happends????


DX: Boarderline Personality Disorder, Mood Disorder, Anxiety, MDD,
Meds: Wellbutrin 300mg , Topamax 800mg, Buspirone 30mg



#2 bluechick

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 02:30 PM

When you are asleep your body releases a hormone that paralyzes you.  It's so you don't hurt yourself. 


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#3 AirMarshall

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 02:55 PM

<Not hormone.  Brain states.>

 

The during sleep the brain largely disables the ability to make muscle and limb movements in order to protect us.   It also transitions from a wakeful state to a dreaming state and vice versa.   Normally this transition happens quite rapidly.

 

When the transition is not rapid, the brain mixes up the real world, dreams, and perhaps 'sleep paralysis' state.  This mixed state gets perceived as 'wakeful dreaming', where dreams and real world get mixed.  Sleep paralysis is where we awaken but are unable to move or speak.  Reports of alien abductions, alien probing, secubus etc. are also products of these wakeful/dreaming states.

 

These experiences are quite common among the normal healthy population.  They have no association nor reflection on mental illness.   Once you know what they are, this knowledge should make them less frightening.

 

There is excellent information on the web. Key words are:  Sleep Paralysis, Hypnopompic /  Hypnogogic hallucination. 

 

(note:  allthough they are called 'hallucinations they have no relation to psychotic states and psychiatrists are not concerned about them)


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#4 notfred

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 03:06 PM

For your own good.



#5 hagar

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 03:51 PM

It is quite frightening. When I get sleep paralysis, I have an impending sense of doom and often "see" large dark figures standing over me. Even knowing what's happening, it's scary. 


"But nobody ever sees how far the things we shouldn't feel can take us. I just want to walk along the shore for an hour, watch the waves rearranging whatever they can. I like the way the sea encourages me to think about the past, as if I could leave it where it is: the moon on the water, the stars that gleam and are gone."

#6 melissaw72

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Posted 20 December 2012 - 04:59 PM

I hate sleep paralysis ... like hagar said, when it happens I "see" figures (usually of huge, rabid dogs) standing right next to me ready to jump on me.  I agree it is scary.


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Current meds: Provigil, Klonopin, Xanax, Naltrexone, Wellbutrin, Abilify, Lamictal, Prozac, Lansoprazole, Linzess, QVAR inhaler, Xopenex inhaler, Methimazole, Flonase, Propranolol, Flexeril, Zofran.

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#7 AirMarshall

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 01:44 AM

Oh, I agree.  After not having an incident in ages, I had one last week where I awoke, was frightened of some dream, and was unable to move or scream.  Most disconcerting not being able to scream.


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#8 neferi

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 02:37 AM

I got that black figure but I couldn't make it out what it was,but I was fighting soo hard to scream but I couldn't or even move.  I just felt more exhusted the next day.   It's weird I never had these before and now it seems I'm getting them a few times a week.


DX: Boarderline Personality Disorder, Mood Disorder, Anxiety, MDD,
Meds: Wellbutrin 300mg , Topamax 800mg, Buspirone 30mg


#9 melissaw72

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 03:57 AM

I got that black figure but I couldn't make it out what it was,but I was fighting soo hard to scream but I couldn't or even move.  I just felt more exhusted the next day.   It's weird I never had these before and now it seems I'm getting them a few times a week.

 

You might want to talk to your pdoc about you getting them more frequently.  If they are getting worse s/he might want to do a med tweak or something (?).


Current Psychiatric Dxs ... Schizoaffective, bipolar type; Anxiety disorder, PTSD, agoraphobia

Also recovered Anorexic/Bulimic finally after 20 years.

Current meds: Provigil, Klonopin, Xanax, Naltrexone, Wellbutrin, Abilify, Lamictal, Prozac, Lansoprazole, Linzess, QVAR inhaler, Xopenex inhaler, Methimazole, Flonase, Propranolol, Flexeril, Zofran.

Any questions just ask :)

 

"I've learned so much from my mistakes, I think I'll make a few more."






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