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The dangers of going cold turkey?


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#1 Breebree93

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 02:28 PM

I've decided I'm not longer going to drink, smoke pot or smoke cigarettes. 

 

I traded a box of cigarettes for hair dye today, and I cannot get ahold of pot and I cannot buy alcohol. 

 

What are the dangers of going cold turkey? I know I shouldn't quit all of these things at once but I really don't want to do them anymore and I can't afford it anyway. 

 

I expect withdrawals and depression, but I feel like this is a necessary change. 


You are young and life is long and there is time to kill today
And then the one day you find ten years have got behind you
No one told you when to run, you missed the starting gun
And you run and you run to catch up with the sun, but it's sinking

And racing around to come up behind you again
~Pink Floyd



#2 bluechick

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 03:13 PM

The withdrawals can mild to severe.

 

First -  alcohol.  This depends on how much you drink.  If it is a regular habit then you may not medical assistance in coming off of it.  Alcohol is one of only two substances where the withdrawal could kill you.  Play it safe and talk to your doctor before you quit.

 

Weed -- has little to no physical withdrawals.  The addiction is primary psychological.  If the weed was being used to combat anxiety or depression, you may see a rebound effect as your anxiety and depression returns.

 

Cigarettes - very difficult to quit.  Side effects include nausea, vomiting, extreme irritability, and more which I just can't remember.  I know it may also have an impact on your cognition.  After 72 hours, the nicotine is out of your bloodstream.  Your body continues to recovery, however, for a long time.  Look it up on the internet.  In fact, you may want to do some research on the healing process after quitting.  Smoking affects virtually every system in your body.  Different systems heal at different rates. For instance, the risk of lung disease returns to that of a non-smoker after about 10 years. Yup, 10 years.  The hardest part it the first 9 months or so as your brain and body adapt.

 

Keep in mind that there are smoking cessation drugs that can help you such as Chantix or Wellbutrin.  I quit on Chantix and it was amazing.  Again, consult your doctor.

 

You should also consider going to support groups such as N.A. or A.A.

 

Good luck to you.  Hang in there.  You can do it.


Dx: Bipolar Disorder I, ADD, BDD
Rx: Lamictal 300mg; Wellbutrin 300mg: Celexa 40mg
FAIL: Lithium; Geodon. Abilify


#3 Breebree93

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 04:28 PM

Thank you BlueChick. I'm going to look into A.A and stuff for my grandma too (for "dealing" with me). Thank you for the information. 


Edited by Breebree93, 31 January 2013 - 04:29 PM.

You are young and life is long and there is time to kill today
And then the one day you find ten years have got behind you
No one told you when to run, you missed the starting gun
And you run and you run to catch up with the sun, but it's sinking

And racing around to come up behind you again
~Pink Floyd


#4 ZenOut

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 11:42 AM

I quit smoking cold turkey a few years ago. The first week was terrible. Huge depression, so sick coughing up my lungs, wanting nothing more to be past it. But then it was fine. Yes the cravings were still there to an extent for a long time, but they passed and pretty soon the very taste of cigarettes was abhorrent to me. 

 

So, it's maybe tricky to go off all at once, simply because it requires a lot of mental energy just to quit one thing, not to mention to weather the physical discomfort. But I would say, yeah, you can do it if you're willing to be uncomfortable for a while and feeling steady enough to get yourself through. Good luck. :) (It's worth it!)


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#5 Mirazh

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 02:37 PM

If you don't require medical assistance for the booze, prepare yourself for some detox time at home. No obligations for weeks. Lots of distractions and self care things on hand. Pamper and comfort yourself. Ginger tea, to help with nausea. Chamomile. Stuff like that.

Cigarettes were easy for me, as was booze. Obviously, YMMV.

Weed was the hardest for me. Headaches, insomnia, depression, anxiety, irrritability.I had a return of self harming, before I was put on meds at a dose that finally started to work. Once my Depakote kicked in, I was fine.

I wish you the best.

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