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Dieting Advice


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#1 Derek

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 02:04 AM

Dieting is one of the most difficult things for me, simply because I'm a food addict, I love it.  Not ashamed to admit it.  However, my weight and blood pressure have gotten high enough to where I need to diet, and let's just say it sucks....

 

I've done several in the past, and each time I get depression and anxiety symptoms.  Question is how to deal with these?  I'm sure it's quite normal to get this, but I don't know how to deal with it other than just eating again...I usually go pretty extreme on my dieting, reduce my calories for the most part, and cut carbs out.  Are there any good strategies to keep both the weight and bad emotions away?  I can't seem to find a dieting medium that will do just this....


Edited by Derek, 17 February 2013 - 02:06 AM.

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#2 melissaw72

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 02:13 AM

This isn't a diet drug, but I am on naltrexone for food addiction.  You still get hungry but it takes away (at least for me) the cravings and I eat less than I had been before on this med.

 

Have  you tried seeing a dietitian?


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#3 Derek

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 02:23 AM

This isn't a diet drug, but I am on naltrexone for food addiction.  You still get hungry but it takes away (at least for me) the cravings and I eat less than I had been before on this med.

 

Have  you tried seeing a dietitian?

No, I got enough bills.  I can handle the food cravings, it's just that after a week of dieting or so I'm usually feeling pretty depressed.  That's the part I have trouble handling.


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#4 melissaw72

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 02:44 AM

Do you see a pdoc and/or tdoc?  Sometimes they can help with that.


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#5 rosesforthedead

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 03:59 AM

Long story short:  Do not diet.  They don't work.  They do not work because they are not sustainable.  Believe me, I have been on every diet ever invented, from crazy ass crash diets to more modest "just cut out this food group" type diets.  None of them work because none of them are meant to be used long-term.  Once you get to your goal weight and start eating normally again, all the weight piles back on.  Dieting products will always be out there because they want people to keep yo-yoing and buying their products.  The only way to really lose weight and keep it off is to make better eating an entire lifestyle change.  Doesn't mean you need to be up in the gym 6 days per week or eating like a rabbit.  You can eat pretty much anything you eat now, just do it in moderation.  To say you can't have carbs, or sugar, or fat, or whatever it is, is ludicrous.  You need all of that in your diet.  So like, when you go out, instead of getting a burger and fries, get grilled chicken and a baked potato.  Diet pills and crash diets are fine for short term (like to drop a few vanity pounds prior to an event or something) but do you really want to rely on that the rest of your life?  Hell to the no. 

 

On a mental level, I think it's absolutely normal for your anxiety and depression to skyrocket when your health becomes poor due to weight issues, and struggling with the idea of not being able to have a food you love because it's high in calories or sugar or whatever.  You can skip the massive anxiety by simply not doing it.  If you're a soda junkie, switch to diet and limit yourself to a couple a day to begin with, for example.  Fitness is definitely a process, and there will always be set backs.  Slow and steady and not beating yourself up over your love for food = less anxiety and depression overall. Sure, in order to lose weight you do need to restrict calories a little bit, but nothing drastic.  2,000 calories is what your body needs to maintain it's current state.  If you'd like to shed a few pounds, decrease your intake to 1800 or something.  Don't cut it too much, even though it's tempting because you will drop weight faster, your body will metabolically adapt and therefore cause a plateau as you get used to consuming a few amount of calories.

 

All of that being said, if you'd like to discuss fitness/dieting/etc, please feel free to send me a message.  I would be more than happy to help you come up with something sustainable that will work for your lifestyle.  (If you couldn't tell, I'm waaaay into fitness lol.)


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#6 mcjimjam

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 05:25 AM

If you can't afford a dietician, maybe speak with your PCP. They should be able to help. Forget the drastic fad diets though, they do more harm than good.


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#7 lifequake

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 07:36 AM

Do you have a therapist?  I think the key is finding ways to mange the depression and anxiety that do not involve eating.  A good therapist can help you to identify your feelings and cope with them in a more effective way. 

 

Plus, anytime you give up a pretty entrenched habit or behavior, there is going to be some angst and pain that goes along with it.  I feel for you.  I am a confessed food junkie, too.


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#8 Wooster

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 01:55 PM

Seconding (or thirding) the idea that dieting, especially exceptionally restrictive diets aren't sustainable.

 

The likely reason you are getting depressed and anxious is because you are starving your body, which actually makes it harder to lose weight in the long run.

 

I've been using myfitnesspal.com to track calories for several months. I'm definitely not in a race to lose my extra weight, and I'm feeling pretty pleased with my progress thus far.

 

What I've been learning is how to retool my perception of portion sizes, how much food intake my body *actually* needs in a day (learning this from when I 'bonk' and then overcompensate by eating everything in sight in the late afternoon/early evening), and how much I desire sugar/carbs when I'm stressed.

 

I've also been getting a lot out of listening to podcasts at fat2fit radio (http://fat2fitradio.com)

 

[Disclaimer: I have no financial interest/relationship to either of these sites, they're just things I've found to be helpful].

 

ETA: You might find some good resources in the Lifestyle Alternatives threads... there's an ongoing thread where people can report in on their physical activity and some good threads about healthy recipes.


Edited by Wooster, 17 February 2013 - 01:59 PM.

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#9 olga

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 02:03 PM

I agree with Wooster---when you starve your body, your mood is going to tank.

 

Cutting out all carbs can be dangerous.  Complex carbohydrates are very healthy and have lots of good nutrients and fiber in them.  Refined carbs like sugar and white flour are empty calories and your body won't miss them.

 

Most dietitians will tell you to eat a balance of foods:  Fruits, veggies, protein, complex carbs, and in moderate amounts.  Portion control, as Woo said, is a hard thing to learn.  People in our modern times are used to eating jumbo-sized foods, and it's not what your body needs.

 

If you eliminate all the junk (cookies, candy, chips, soda,fast food, etc) and eat moderate quantities of healthy homemade foods, your body will respond positively.

 

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#10 Derek

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 04:03 PM

Long story short:  Do not diet.  They don't work.  They do not work because they are not sustainable.  Believe me, I have been on every diet ever invented, from crazy ass crash diets to more modest "just cut out this food group" type diets.  None of them work because none of them are meant to be used long-term.  Once you get to your goal weight and start eating normally again, all the weight piles back on.  Dieting products will always be out there because they want people to keep yo-yoing and buying their products.  The only way to really lose weight and keep it off is to make better eating an entire lifestyle change.  Doesn't mean you need to be up in the gym 6 days per week or eating like a rabbit.  You can eat pretty much anything you eat now, just do it in moderation.  To say you can't have carbs, or sugar, or fat, or whatever it is, is ludicrous.  You need all of that in your diet.  So like, when you go out, instead of getting a burger and fries, get grilled chicken and a baked potato.  Diet pills and crash diets are fine for short term (like to drop a few vanity pounds prior to an event or something) but do you really want to rely on that the rest of your life?  Hell to the no. 

 

On a mental level, I think it's absolutely normal for your anxiety and depression to skyrocket when your health becomes poor due to weight issues, and struggling with the idea of not being able to have a food you love because it's high in calories or sugar or whatever.  You can skip the massive anxiety by simply not doing it.  If you're a soda junkie, switch to diet and limit yourself to a couple a day to begin with, for example.  Fitness is definitely a process, and there will always be set backs.  Slow and steady and not beating yourself up over your love for food = less anxiety and depression overall. Sure, in order to lose weight you do need to restrict calories a little bit, but nothing drastic.  2,000 calories is what your body needs to maintain it's current state.  If you'd like to shed a few pounds, decrease your intake to 1800 or something.  Don't cut it too much, even though it's tempting because you will drop weight faster, your body will metabolically adapt and therefore cause a plateau as you get used to consuming a few amount of calories.

 

All of that being said, if you'd like to discuss fitness/dieting/etc, please feel free to send me a message.  I would be more than happy to help you come up with something sustainable that will work for your lifestyle.  (If you couldn't tell, I'm waaaay into fitness lol.)

Thanks for your response.  

 

How long of a "diet/lifestyle change" does it take for your body to say "ok, this is my new weight"   It's just eating nuts and lettuce doesnt seem like a viable solution in the long run. 

 

My original plan was a crash diet and then a slow increase back to 2000.  However I admit that occasionally I will binge at night as a guilty pleasure.

 

Hypothetically, will a 2-4 week crash diet, every 3 months work to maintain weight?


Edited by Derek, 17 February 2013 - 04:22 PM.

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#11 rosesforthedead

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:48 PM

Long story short:  Do not diet.  They don't work.  They do not work because they are not sustainable.  Believe me, I have been on every diet ever invented, from crazy ass crash diets to more modest "just cut out this food group" type diets.  None of them work because none of them are meant to be used long-term.  Once you get to your goal weight and start eating normally again, all the weight piles back on.  Dieting products will always be out there because they want people to keep yo-yoing and buying their products.  The only way to really lose weight and keep it off is to make better eating an entire lifestyle change.  Doesn't mean you need to be up in the gym 6 days per week or eating like a rabbit.  You can eat pretty much anything you eat now, just do it in moderation.  To say you can't have carbs, or sugar, or fat, or whatever it is, is ludicrous.  You need all of that in your diet.  So like, when you go out, instead of getting a burger and fries, get grilled chicken and a baked potato.  Diet pills and crash diets are fine for short term (like to drop a few vanity pounds prior to an event or something) but do you really want to rely on that the rest of your life?  Hell to the no. 

 

On a mental level, I think it's absolutely normal for your anxiety and depression to skyrocket when your health becomes poor due to weight issues, and struggling with the idea of not being able to have a food you love because it's high in calories or sugar or whatever.  You can skip the massive anxiety by simply not doing it.  If you're a soda junkie, switch to diet and limit yourself to a couple a day to begin with, for example.  Fitness is definitely a process, and there will always be set backs.  Slow and steady and not beating yourself up over your love for food = less anxiety and depression overall. Sure, in order to lose weight you do need to restrict calories a little bit, but nothing drastic.  2,000 calories is what your body needs to maintain it's current state.  If you'd like to shed a few pounds, decrease your intake to 1800 or something.  Don't cut it too much, even though it's tempting because you will drop weight faster, your body will metabolically adapt and therefore cause a plateau as you get used to consuming a few amount of calories.

 

All of that being said, if you'd like to discuss fitness/dieting/etc, please feel free to send me a message.  I would be more than happy to help you come up with something sustainable that will work for your lifestyle.  (If you couldn't tell, I'm waaaay into fitness lol.)

Thanks for your response.  

 

How long of a "diet/lifestyle change" does it take for your body to say "ok, this is my new weight"   It's just eating nuts and lettuce doesnt seem like a viable solution in the long run. 

 

My original plan was a crash diet and then a slow increase back to 2000.  However I admit that occasionally I will binge at night as a guilty pleasure.

 

Hypothetically, will a 2-4 week crash diet, every 3 months work to maintain weight?

 

Eating nuts and lettuce?  Ewww no way!  With the exception of fried foods (which I never cared for much anyway) I still eat everything I used to eat.  I just changed the way it was prepared.  Instead of fried chicken, I'll eat baked chicken.  I still eat ice cream and pizza and everything I've always eaten and I'm still losing weight.  As I said, the key is moderation.  It will take sometime, everyone's body is different.  The real key, I've found, to losing weight and keeping it off is not to avoid certain foods, crash diets, etc.  The key is keeping your body off balance.  If you drastically cut your caloric intake by half and eat, say, 1000 calories a day, your body will adapt and be able to function as efficiently on a lower amount of calories.  It's called metabolic adaptation, and it can happen very quickly.  How quickly really depends on your body and metabolism.  If you notice after a few days of not eating, you get less hungry by the end of 3-4 days.  That's because your body is adapting and learning to function as normal on lesser energy.  The same goes for exercise.  For example, if you started jogging, but did no other physical activity, it's super difficult at first, and gradually gets easier for a number of reasons.  1. You're getting more fit and strong, but also 2. Your body is learning to perform the task more efficiently (ie: adapting.)  This is why after, say, a month of very restricted calorie intake, or a month of the same exercise without variety, you will undoubtedly hit the dreaded plateau, where what you're doing isn't working anymore.

 

I don't know your exact situation, but something that could possibly be sustainable for you is to do what I call a "3 Day Cycle."  It does involve counting calories, which can be a pain, but it is a great way to help you lose the weight you want.  For example, on day 1, you'll track everything you eat up to 1,800 or 2,000 calories (whatever you choose to start with.)  On day 2, cut your calorie intake by 200 calories.  On day 3, cut your calorie intake by another 200 calories.  That completes the cycle. On day 4, you go back to 1,800 or 2,000, and continue on.  You can eat virtually anything you want.  The 3 day cycle works because for each day your body is having to adapt to a lower amount of calories, then suddenly has an overabundance of calories, and works harder to get rid of them.  On the day where you eat the fewest calories, your body has not fully adapted to the decreased amount of energy yet, and is still functioning as if you were eating the max amount of calories.  Keeping your body off balance in this way keeps your metabolism up so you lose more weight more efficiently without killing yourself or making yourself miserable by cutting out foods you love.  Every time I'd done this 3 Day Cycle consistently along with exercise (even just walking!) I always lose weight relatively quickly.

 

To answer your question about crash dieting for a few weeks then gradually going back to eating 2,000 calories... That will not work to sustain your body weight.  Your body adapts fairly quickly, so after 3 weeks of crash dieting, increasing your food intake is going to make your body store all the extra calories (and carbs, which your body processes as sugar) as fat.  Essentially what this will do is keep your weight going up then coming down.  Rapid weight gain and loss are both very unhealthy.

 

You mentioned that you binge eat as a guilty pleasure occasionally. Do you think you may stop, or at least decrease the occurrence of the binge eating if you're not restricting yourself so tightly?  I find that I binge a lot when I'm trying to cut something out completely, because I love food (specifically, junk food) so when I don't allow myself to have it, I go nuts and eat a TON of it.  I don't binge eat much anymore because I let myself have a slice of pizza, or an ice cream cone, or a piece of cake.  The key is moderation.  You can have everything you love, but not an entire pizza or an entire cake.

 

Remember, it took you a long time to get in this unhealthy state where you're maybe a little overweight, high cholesterol and blood pressure, etc.  There is not a quick fix (aside from surgery) to reverse this.  Anything that claims to be a quick fix is not going to work.  Anything worth doing is worth waiting for.  You may not see the changes immediately, but the day you step on the scale and the number drops by a couple pounds...or your blood pressure value decreases a few points.. will feel SO good. 

 

Side note:  I don't know what your diet is like, but a way to drop some pounds pretty quickly is to avoid fast food (with the exception of Subway 7 under 6 menu) and stop consuming "empty calories" like soda.  Cutting out 160 calories for a can of Coke means that you get to eat 160 calories of food!


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#12 rosesforthedead

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 02:53 PM

Oh.  A really good calorie tracker you can use is http://www.myfitnesspal.com.  I think they have a phone app as well if you have a smart phone.


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#13 Derek

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 06:27 PM

Thanks for your advice once again.

 

I'm not going to lie, I just want to lose the weight and go back to what I was doing lol.  Yes, I know it's the wrong mindset.  I think with each diet I go on, I become a little more aware of my food, and slow down a bit, so some progress is being made. 

 

It's just when people say "lifestyle change", all I really hear is  "lifelong diet of misery and terrible foods." 

 

I've managed to lose 10 pounds so far with small meals and a few granola bars in between.  I also eat at Subway as it's not the most terrible place to eat out.  It just seems like finding a diet without terrible food is nearly impossible.  Most people try and prop up their nasty tasting foods, but I know it's horrible already.  The alternative diets are few and far between the Taco Bells and Mcdonalds...


Edited by Derek, 18 February 2013 - 06:34 PM.

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#14 rosesforthedead

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 08:26 PM

Thanks for your advice once again.

 

I'm not going to lie, I just want to lose the weight and go back to what I was doing lol.  Yes, I know it's the wrong mindset.  I think with each diet I go on, I become a little more aware of my food, and slow down a bit, so some progress is being made. 

 

It's just when people say "lifestyle change", all I really hear is  "lifelong diet of misery and terrible foods." 

 

I've managed to lose 10 pounds so far with small meals and a few granola bars in between.  I also eat at Subway as it's not the most terrible place to eat out.  It just seems like finding a diet without terrible food is nearly impossible.  Most people try and prop up their nasty tasting foods, but I know it's horrible already.  The alternative diets are few and far between the Taco Bells and Mcdonalds...

 

Well, if you lose weight then go back to eating badly and excessively, you won't break the cycle and your weight and other health issues will be a constant battle for you.  The good thing is that you realize what is going to happen ahead of time.  That means you have more control over it, and that's a good thing!   Try not to let the phrase "lifestyle change" conjure up bad images for you of food that tastes like cardboard!  Like I said, you can absolutely eat all the foods you love.  I just got done with my dinner and I had steak, stuffing, and carrots.  Tomorrow, I'll have chicken, mashed potatoes, and corn.  It's not so much about WHAT you eat, it's HOW you eat it, and how much you eat.

 

It sounds like you're at least making progress and starting to understand what your specific body needs to lose weight.  That is so awesome, not everyone knows that kind of information, and not all diets work for everyone.  What does work for everyone?  Exactly what you're doing.  More meals throughout the day with smaller portions and healthy snacks.  You're on the right track!  I would still avoid going on a diet all together.  Eating smarter, healthier foods isn't really a "diet" it's just making better choices. :)  If you're doing that, you don't need to think of it as a restrictive, miserable diet.  You'll be eating normally and losing weight in a healthy way.  I think you're doing pretty well.


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#15 Wooster

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 09:42 PM

We just had beef nachos at our house for dinner.

 

Still on track with my goals over here.

 

I also regularly eat ice cream and am still seeing the scale moving in the desired direction to lose my slurroquel belly.


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#16 WinglessFaery

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 09:58 PM

Derek-

I totally feel you. I think eating is definitly an addiction for me. When I first start out eating healthy it feels like im losing a good friend by not eating too comfort myself.

Rosesforthedead-

Just wanted too say that three day cycle thing is genious I will def be trying that!
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#17 WinterRosie

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 01:01 PM

I take it that by "lifestyle change" you aren't seeing "eliminate a bad habit every six weeks and replace it with something good that you enjoy."

 

Also, I only skimmed this thread for fear of ED-triggering. So, hopefully that isn't happening.


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#18 WhiteFemale

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 01:20 PM

I would consult with your physician. But generally, you just wanna drink more water, eat smaller portions, eat healthier choices, and eat enough. Always consume less than you use in a day. Exercise. Don't eat at night, before you go to bed. 

I lost 30 pounds by going to the gym 3-4 times a week, and doing the above. Now I wanna get back on that


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#19 Derek

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 07:23 PM

Ya eating before bed is a big one, I have trouble with that.

 

One more question, does anyone know the safest amount of weight you can lose weekly ?  I'm at 240 now.


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#20 WinterRosie

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    Staring down the spoils of war

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 07:40 PM

1-2 lbs weekly. Puts Biggest Loser in a new light, doesn't it?

Si nous ne sommes pas pro-nous-autres, nous sommes anti-nous-autres. Oh look! I made a Thing!

 

Rx: weekly injections of Standard Knowledge as needed

 

Note: Staff are here to think with you, not for you. Keep your thinking caps on. I've never been a doctor, not even in high school drama class, so you'll need to ask your own.

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