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Can Pharmacy Call your doc?


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#1 Breeze

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Posted 12 June 2005 - 07:00 PM

OK:

I am really pissed off about my pharmacy right now and wondering if I have a legal leg to stand on. I brought in a prescription dated and signed that day by my doctor. The insurance company rejected it because it was early, but I thought my doctor had ok'd the early pick up. His nurse had told me in a conversation three days prior that upon my visit he would write me a script a few days early.

I explained this to my pharmacy and they in turn, called my doctor(without my knowledge) who realized that he had given me the meds too early. I am new to this doctor and we have started off poorly. I had just left his office where we had straightened out a bunch of these issues and I was feeling good about my visit, I really thought that he meant for me to fill the prescription, even though it was early and add it to what I had.

  Well, the pharmacy told me they would either do an over ride on the insurance or let me pay for it privately. Cool.

  I get a call from my doctor instead, and during the call he says he didn't realize how early he had given me the script. He asks how many I have left, I tell him and he goes ape shit. I have taken too many - these are pain meds. Nuff said. I should say I have been on them for years for a back condition - please no lectures. This was a new doctor who threw me right into pyshical therapy before he took x-rays. Had he done the xrays first, I would not have been in the sky rocketing pain I was in, and I would not have been over on my allotment. But this is neither here not there.

  He screams at me on the phone about my usage and how I could die. Drama abounded. In my confusion and ANXIETY I didn't realize that I had a stash of 20 some odd pills at work. This too is water under the bridge.

THE QUESTION IS:

With all this privacy crap you sign now, can the pharmacy just call the doctor without you knowing? Does anyone know anything about this? I have been going to this pharmacy for years and the little bitch that set me up has to see my face tomorrow (or not) and I want to know my rights before I talk to the owner.

ANY ADVICE????

Edited by Breeze, 12 June 2005 - 07:01 PM.

Best to speak kindly, act with care, lest your tomorrow be filled with fear


#2 ethereal

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Posted 12 June 2005 - 11:16 PM

With all this privacy crap you sign now, can the pharmacy just call the doctor without you knowing? Does anyone know anything about this? I have been going to this pharmacy for years and the little bitch that set me up has to see my face tomorrow (or not) and I want to know my rights before I talk to the owner.

ANY ADVICE????

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Yes. The pharmacy can call your doctor without your permission. I've had that happen many times.

#3 Batou

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Posted 13 June 2005 - 06:01 PM

If your Rx was a pain killer, if it was any kind of narcotic pain killer, then a pharmacist may call your doctor to confirm the Rx due to being paranoid. Why? Pain killers these days are being watched very carefully by the DEA, especially oxycotin. So many doctors and pharmacists are very careful in documenting/confirming an Rx before it is dispensed. For some of the Schedule II subtances a Rx has to be written in triplicate (carbonless copies) so that one stays with the doctor, one goes to the pharmacist, and in some states one copy is saved on file or goes to the DEA in order to keep track of doctors and pharmacists who are writing and filling Rxs. So it may not have been just about you getting an early refill, it could also be a case of the pharmacist wanting to cover his ass. 

I had to speak with a DEA agaent because one of the patients said that her GP was giving her large amounts of oxycotin. I had no choice but to bring the information to the DEA's attention, or the doc I was working for could have got in trouble. The patient's name was kept confidential but not the GPs name. The GP was later arrested but not before he nearly lost his mind having to detox himself cold turkey from oxycotin because he could no longer write illegal Rxs to feed his own habit.

So it may just be due to the policing of narcortics these days.

Erika

Edited by Erika, 13 June 2005 - 07:35 PM.

Yea, if you think you're going to get somewhere in life by cheating, I mean you may as well just paint yourself yellow, run around like a maniac, and call yourself banana man, 'cause that's what you're doing.
Master Shake, Aqua Teen Hunger Force

misc. info -- Don't EVER put a rusty Ford tractor on a track with a Lamborghini. It is not wise.


**I am not a pharmacist, a MD, or a psychologist. For professional advice, speak with a professional.*

#4 Bryan

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Posted 13 June 2005 - 07:29 PM

So the DEA is especially monitoring medications containing oxycodone (Percocet, OxyContin, Percodan) because they are Schedule II narcotics.

So what happens?  Prescriptions for hydrocodone (Vicodin) have been on the rise.  As a matter of fact, Vicodin is the most commonly prescribed pill for pain (and most commonly abused).

#5 Batou

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Posted 13 June 2005 - 07:37 PM

So the DEA is especially monitoring medications containing oxycodone (Percocet, OxyContin, Percodan) because they are Schedule II narcotics.

So what happens?  Prescriptions for hydrocodone (Vicodin) have been on the rise.  As a matter of fact, Vicodin is the most commonly prescribed pill for pain (and most commonly abused).

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Just writing what I know from personal experience and a very uncomfortable interview with a DEA agent. I don't know what is going to happen to other pain killers or their abuse factor. It was just soem FYI
Yea, if you think you're going to get somewhere in life by cheating, I mean you may as well just paint yourself yellow, run around like a maniac, and call yourself banana man, 'cause that's what you're doing.
Master Shake, Aqua Teen Hunger Force

misc. info -- Don't EVER put a rusty Ford tractor on a track with a Lamborghini. It is not wise.


**I am not a pharmacist, a MD, or a psychologist. For professional advice, speak with a professional.*

#6 Beth

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Posted 18 June 2005 - 05:30 PM

It was probably due to the insurance not accepting an early refill.  It's not illegal at all for a pharmacy to check in with the doctor when they're unsure about things relating to a prescription.  Don't worry too much about it.  Ask the pharmacy why they called your doctor, and/or ask your doctor about it.  It's usually a problem between any combination of the pharmacy, your doctor, or your insurance.  Unfortunately there are too many anal rules that they must adhere to and check up on with each other.
There is no genius free from some tincture of madness.  - Seneca.

Dx: Bipolar II
Rx: 100mg Lamictal, 75mg Seroquel

#7 doghappy

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Posted 14 July 2005 - 12:04 PM

I'm more concerned with your pdoc screaming at you. How has that worked out?
Quick Bio: BPI, ultrarapid cycler (at times). I take Lithium, Geodon, Topamax, Phenytoin, Seroquel, Provigil, Levothyroxin, Namenda, Celexa (1 mg)


"We are healed of a suffering only by experiencing it to the full." Marcel Proust

#8 miab

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Posted 18 July 2005 - 05:46 PM

Different country, but here the pharmacist certainly has the right to query any script handed to them.  Even if your case was legit, so many of these meds are open to abuse and the pharmacists can get into deep shit for their participation in filling illegitimate early scripts.  My pdoc is currently changing my meds on an almost weekly basis; fortunately it's things like trileptal that are highly unlikely (as far as I know) to be open to abuse, but my insurance co refuses to cover them if they consider it too soon, and I have to pay cash.

We've actually been grateful when the pharmacist called my husband's pdoc to query a bizarre dosage of a narcotic... in that particular situation the pdoc did his "I am God" act and cost us over 10x what we should have been able to pay (the pharmacist wasn't able to do anything about it), but we moved on to another doc who is being more realistic and reasonable.

Bottomline however... yeah, in this country, and from what I hear, this is an international thing, the pharmacist has every right to query scripts.  Frequently (in my opinion at least) they know more than the actual docs about the pharmaceuticals, and if you are using the same pharmacy, are more in touch with the amount being used.  I do agree with doghappy though about your pdoc screaming at you... not acceptable.  He clearly realised he'd screwed up and should have read your chart and history more closely.  Ugh.

Edited by Skittle, 18 July 2005 - 05:48 PM.

Call me Mia.

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Daily meds: Lithium 750mg, Seroquel XR 600mg, Seroquel IR 125mg, Lamotrigine 25mg (slowly going up), Fluanxol 1mg, Alprazolam SR 1mg
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Ex meds: Amitriptyline, Ativan, Clozapine, Effexor XR, Ritalin, Solian, Tegretol, Thorazine, Trileptal, Wellbutrin, Zoloft, Zolpidem, Zyprexa
 

I am not a healthcare professional of any kind.  Always consult your care provider.






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