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a list of photosensitive drugs

13 posts in this topic

Posted

Photoallergic Reaction

chlorothiazide

enoxacin

estrogens

fenofibrate

hydrochlorothiazide

ibuprofen

imipramine

indomethacin

itraconazole

methoxsalen

nalidixic acid

pentobarbital

phenobarbital

piroxicam

promazine

promethazine

psoralens

quinethazone

quinidine

quinine

sulfisoxazole

thioridazine

tolbutamide

trioxsalen

Photosensitivity

acetazolamide

acetohexamide

aldesleukin

allopurinol

alprazolam

amantadine

amiloride

aminosalicylate sodium

amiodarone

amitriptyline

amobarbital

amoxapine

astemizole

atenolol

atorvastatin

atropine sulfate

azathioprine

azithromycin

benazepril

bendroflumethiazide

benzthiazide

benztropine

betaxolol

bisoprolol

brompheniramine

bumetanide

butabarbital

butalbital

captopril

carbamazepine

carisoprodol

carteolol

cefazolin

ceftazidime

celecoxib

cerivastatin

cetirizine

chlorambucil

chlordiazepoxide

chlorhexidine

chloroquine

chlorothiazide

chlorotrianisene

chlorpromazine

chlorpropamide

chlorthalidone

cinoxacin

ciprofloxacin

citalopram

clemastine

clofazimine

clofibrate

clomipramine

clorazepate

clozapine

co-trimoxazole

cromolyn

cyclamate

cyclobenzaprine

cyclothiazide

cyproheptadine

dacarbazine

danazol

dantrolene

dapsone

demeclocycline

desipramine

diazoxide

diclofenac

diflunisal

diltiazem

dimenhydrinate

diphenhydramine

disopyramide

docetaxel

doxepin

doxycycline

enalapril

enoxacin

epoetin alfa

estazolam

estrogens

ethacrynic acid

ethambutol

ethionamide

etodolac

felbamate

fenofibrate

flucytosine

fluorouracil

fluoxetine

fluphenazine

flurbiprofen

flutamide

fluvastatin

fluvoxamine

fosinopril

furazolidone

furosemide

ganciclovir

gentamicin

glimepiride

glipizide

glyburide

glycopyrrolate

gold & gold compounds

grepafloxacin

griseofulvin

haloperidol

heroin

hydralazine

hydrochlorothiazide

hydroflumethiazide

hydroxychloroquine

hydroxyurea

hydroxyzine

ibuprofen

imipramine

indapamide

interferons, alfa

isocarboxazid

isoniazid

isotretinoin

kanamycin

ketoconazole

ketoprofen

lamotrigine

leuprolide

levofloxacin

lincomycin

lisinopril

lomefloxacin

loratadine

losartan

loxapine

maprotiline

meclizine

meclofenamate

medroxyprogesterone

mefenamic acid

meprobamate

mercaptopurine

mesalamine

mesoridazine

metformin

methazolamide

methenamine

methotrexate

methoxsalen

methyclothiazide

methyldopa

methylphenidate

metolazone

minocycline

mirtazapine

mitomycin

moexipril

molindone

nabumetone

nalidixic acid

naproxen

naratriptan

nefazodone

nifedipine

nisoldipine

nitrofurantoin

norfloxacin

nortriptyline

ofloxacin

olanzapine

oral contraceptives

oxytetracycline

paroxetine

pentobarbital

pentosan

pentostatin

perphenazine

phenelzine

phenindamine

phenobarbital

pimozide

piroxicam

polythiazide

pravastatin

procarbazine

prochlorperazine

procyclidine

promazine

promethazine

propranolol

protriptyline

psoralens

pyridoxine

pyrilamine

pyrimethamine

quetiapine

quinacrine

quinapril

quinestrol

quinethazone

quinidine

quinine

ramipril

ranitidine

ribavirin

riluzole

risperidone

ritonavir

rofecoxib

ropinirole

saccharin

saquinavir

scopolamine

selegiline

sertraline

sildenafil

simvastatin

sodium cromoglycate

sparfloxacin

spironolactone

streptomycin

sulfadiazine

sulfadoxine

sulfamethoxazole

sulfasalazine

sulfisoxazole

sulindac

sumatriptan

tacrolimus

terbinafine

terfenadine

tetracycline

thioguanine

thioridazine

thiothixene

tiagabine

timolol

tiopronin

tolazamide

tolbutamide

topiramate

torsemide

tranylcypromine

trazodone

triamterene

triazolam

trichlormethiazide

trifluoperazine

trihexyphenidyl

trimeprazine

trimethadione

trimethoprim

trimetrexate

trimipramine

trioxsalen

tripelennamine

triprolidine

trovafloxacin

valproic acid

valsartan

venlafaxine

verapamil

vinblastine

vitamin a

zalcitabine

zaleplon

zolmitriptan

zolpidem

Phototoxic Reaction

acitretin

alprazolam

bendroflumethiazide

captopril

cetirizine

chlorpromazine

ciprofloxacin

demeclocycline

doxycycline

enoxacin

fenofibrate

fluorouracil

fluoxetine

furosemide

grepafloxacin

hydrochlorothiazide

itraconazole

lomefloxacin

methoxsalen

nabumetone

naproxen

norfloxacin

nortriptyline

ofloxacin

oxaprozin

prochlorperazine

promazine

propranolol

protriptyline

psoralens

sparfloxacin

sulfisoxazole

sulindac

terazosin

tetracycline

thioridazine

trioxsalen

vinblastine

* courtesy of

Jerome Z. Litt, M.D.   

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Posted (edited)

I took some version of methylphenidate for years, and my Mom has her gold shots. The both of us are so Britishly pale (except for our hair) that I guess we never noticed that.

Edited to add: And I was on imipramine in the second grade, Prozac in the eighth, Luvox for a few days towards the end of ninth grade, Serzone for a few days during the eighth grade, I still take Zyrtec--

Holy crap.

Edited by StrungOutOnLife

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Posted

yeah it's sickening almost. And benadryl should be on that list too. The exact thing they give you to counteract an allergy actually causes one. Hmmmm

Erika

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Posted

So that's why I got the sunburn of my life even though I had 45 spf sunblock on...

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Posted (edited)

What's the difference between all these reactions?  ....I suppose I could just google it, but maybe others would like to know as well.  I'm particularly interested in what a phototoxic reaction is... ;)

Edit: This from http://allergies.about.com/cs/photosensiti...a/aa072301a.htm : The symptoms of these two types of reactions vary some. Phototoxic reactions resemble a very bad sunburn on areas of the skin that were directly exposed to the sunlight. They occur anywhere from 30 minutes to several hours after exposure. The reaction might also include erythema, pain, and possibly blisters.

Photoallergic reactions manifest as scaly, itchy rashes which can appear anywhere from one to fourteen days after exposure on exposed areas of the skin, as well as any other parts of the body.

------

So hey, I answered my own question.  Go me.

Edited by elfmoogle

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Posted

no wonder every monday I come down with a rash.

And i thought I was allergic to work. No- its my phenobarbitol/acetometaphin/caffeine pills.

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Posted

Benadryl _is_ on the list. It's listed under its generic name, dipenhydramine. As are all of the drugs, as far as I can tell.

Two of my three or so are on there. Sheesh! There goes the summer . . .

K

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Posted

Thanks for the list its really interesting and useful.

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Posted

......and for the middle-aged crowd, our blood-pressure meds are on the list.  Oh well, I'm too fat to get into a bathing suit anyway.

sigh.

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Posted

keep all of this in mind, guys... it is sooo important!  I have gotten skin reactions from meds and the sun.  it wasnt an outright reaction, but the combo of my meds (especially one time when I was on a hardcore antibiotic) with a major amount of sun exposure made my skin very hypersensitive... so bad that the eyedrops I use everyday for my contacts all of a sudden caused rash-like marks on my face (where the drops had dripped down my face.  it was horrible and still happens every now and then.  so dont risk it!

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Posted

Erika:

My PCD is always telling me to check the sources of my information.  Who is Jerome Litt and where did you find the list?  Just curious!!

Thanks-

olga

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Posted

Thanks for sharing I have printed it out

x

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Posted

Erika:

My PCD is always telling me to check the sources of my information.

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