Raquin

What books are you currently reading?

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I just started THE END OF THE STORY by Lydia Davis. I've only read two or three pages so I can't really give you my opinion, but so far it's been pretty easy to get into. I just hope it doesn't turn into a sappy love story.

I've also been reading a biography of my favorite author Marguerite Duras (she's my avatar/icon) called MARGUERITE DURAS: A LIFE by Laure Adler. It's good but I haven't read that much of it yet.

I'm reading fiction books alphabetically by the author's last name, and non-fiction books by the subjects last name or the first letter of the subject if it's not a person. Does anyone else do this?

So what are you guys reading????

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Doris Kearns Goodwins "A Team of Rivals" about Abe Lincoln and the men on his cabinet. It won the Lincoln Prize last year when it was published.

Ok, I'll 'fess up. I have been 'reading' it for 15 months. It's on my nightstand, and at this rate it will take me about 4 more years. heh.

She is such a good writer, combining a good mix of the mens personal lives, quoting letters with their wives, and their professional and political careers.

I'm getting a much different perspective on how deeply the division on slavery was decades before the civil war. A coming war and partition of the country was being talked about 20-30 years earlier.

Its a good read if you like more detailed history.

cheers, a.m.

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I read really slowly. I asked my pdoc if he could recommend any books on psychosis and he suggested reading autobiographies by people with sz. I was reading "The Center Cannot Hold" by Elyn Saks. She's a lawyer and professor with sz and she went to oxford and yale. It's inspiring how much she could accomplish even when psychotic. I'm going to a seminar in May and she's the keynote speaker. I'm looking forward to it. It was a library book and I had to return it, but I'll check it out again and finish it.

Now I'm going to start reading "The Quiet Room" by Lori Schiller

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I'm reading fiction books alphabetically by the author's last name, and non-fiction books by the subjects last name or the first letter of the subject if it's not a person. Does anyone else do this?

Interesting...I actually read them in the order that I received them - I get a little bit edgy if I don't. It's like the world will end if I read the book I just got over the one that's been sitting on my nightstand for a month. Weird, huh? I guess it's bad bc it's been paralyzing me into reading crappy magazines...and buying sudoku books.

Ok, I've been reading a lot of cookbook's right now (but I put that in a different category from "reading" - don't ask me why). I've been reading a lot of online articles. I've been reading a lot of whacky shit on CB (and that's all I have to say about that).

And I have "Twist of the Wrist II" all queued up and next to my bed so I can ride that Ducati like there's no tomorrow...I also have

"Networking for Job Search and Career Success" queued up too, although, I'm not overly excited about that one...lol.

I have Anais Nin's biography next to my bed and am stuck on the second time she sleeps with her father. I have been keeping "A Natural Guide to Weight Loss that Lasts" next to my bed as a reference guide (I always need to remind myself of the healing foods and the order of the qigong movements).

I also keep a few favorites by the bed: "The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali" and "The Bhagadavita". Good for meditations before sleep...or when you can't sleep.

Good topic - thanks Tinneas ;)

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I "read" with my ears mostly these days. Audio books are so helpful.

So I'm 'reading' Ireland by Frank Delaney. It's a story about a boy's search for a storyteller, which is cool because you get the story, but then you also get the story and history of Ireland.

I'm also "rereading" The Places that Scare You: A Guide to Fearlessness in Difficult Times by buddhist nun/lama Pema Chodron. Lots of good mindfulness practices in there. Several of my friends recommend another book by her called "When THings Fall Apart".

Arthur Conan Doyle, Charles Dickens and PG Wodehouse and Tolstoy and Vanity Fair by Thackery and several others are availble as free downloads from librivox.com because they're old enough to be in the public domain now.

My tdoc and I have discovered that reading can also be therapeutic for me because it gives me words for experiences (I'm a pretty strong visual thinker and have difficulty putting words to experience). For example, the book Lucky by Alice Sebold (story of the rape she survived and subsequent fallout) gave me words for some of the things I've experienced that have lead to the ptsd symptoms I have. Having tdoc read the book and ask me to compare and contrast experiences of Alice and my own has been really helpful in getting the words out of my head and shared with another person. Not sure if that makes sense or not.

Peace,

Wooster

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I am an avid reader. I read fiction (mysteries, thrillers, etc) usually before bed or naps. I can't fall asleep without reading.

I have a system of searching Amazon.com, making my list, and requesting from the library. The last time I moved, I realized how many books I owned (which was a lot) and donated them to the library. Since then I only get fiction from the library. I have many favorite authors: Robert Crais, Harlen Coben, Michael Connelly, Lee Child, Karin Slaughter, Tess Gerritsen, Janet Evanovich, Nelson DeMille, Jeffrey Deaver, Lincoln Child, Douglas Preston, and so on. I read for relaxation, not to be intellectually challenged.

I also read non-fiction (spiritual, health, self-help, bipolar, etc). I do buy non-fiction. Sometimes I read them before bed when I'm in a lull with fiction, but other times I read them in front of the TV.

Currently, I am reading Lost Souls by Lisa Jackson. It's a mystery about a serial killer. It's good/not great.

My non-fiction is The Mindful Way Through Depression. Haven't gotten very far yet, but I like it.

Oreo ;)

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I very rarely read these days. I use to be an avid reader, but it's too hard for me to focus now. It feels almost as if someone is reaching in my skull and ripping my brain apart when I try. ;)

That being said I am reading two currently. The first is "Brokeback Mountain" by Annie Proulx. That's for a book club I participate in when I can. Because it's a novellete, or actually a short story, I'm able to read it. It's an easy read and a marvelous story.

The other one is "Awakening The Buddha Within" by Lama Surya Das. I'm a Unitarian Universalist but I have Buddhist leanings. Lama Das is a marvelous teacher and consider him my spiritual guide in many ways.

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O.K.'s fiction list sounds a lot like what I picked up from my SIL - except the Preston/Child that I got to on my own - plus a whole lot of others.

Just finished John Upcike's 'Terrorist', Paulo Coelho's 'Witch of Portobello, Haruki Murakami's 'Kafka on the Shore' (Good. Want to read more.) and finally got around to reading some more of Sheri Tepper's SF stuff. This time 'The Awakeners'. I read 'Grass' a few years ago and liked it. I like her style.

Also recently read 'Pattern Recognition' by William Gibson (great), 'Oryx and Crake' by Margaret Atwood (first I'd read - or heard of her. Surprised me. Good.), 'Anil's Ghost' by Michael Ondaatje - also very good and makes me want to read the one he's famous for - French Louis Chickie? (movie didn't sound good, so I haven't seen it.

Non fiction - trying to finish (start?) John Bowlby's 3 volume set on Attachment and Loss and am almost finished with "Holding and Interpretation - Fragment of an Analysis" by DW Winnicott. I'm finding that one somehow very ? 'effective' ? not sure how to describe it. Gives me a lot to think about - and to maybe pass on to my therapist.

Have read or am trying to, several books associated with Attachment Theory and Object Relations theory. Maybe eventually it will begin to sink in!!

Oh, am almost ready to begin'The System of the World', vol. 3 of Neal Stephenson's (homeboy!) Baroque Cycle. An amazing writer if you like intricacy.

Sorry for long post.

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My favorite author is Christine Feehan. Total smut trash, but i love it! I've read all her books at least 3or4 times. Also read all of Preston/Childs books, many more than once. Dean Koontz, Stephen King. just finished the "Dark Tower Seriers". After reading 7 1000 page books, the ending really irked me. Lisa Jackson, I just started to get into. Yes, light reading. I read a book per day or two because Im not working and kids at school. I read in my sanctiory, my bed, or my fav. reading chair. No interest in intellectual reading lately. Don't think my medicated brain is up to it. But I love to read. It is my favorite thing to do.

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I'm reading Scar Tissue by Anthony Keidis.

Almost half way into it.

It's another rock n roll biography with sex and drugs basically, and then coming clean. I seem to be drawn to these books hmmm

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Madness on the Couch: Blaming the Victim in the Heyday of Psychoanalysis Dolnick

A broad, but decent and sensible overview of the world where puns diagnosed illness.

The Journal of a Disappointed Man "WNP Barbellion"

Despite a lack of sex or great intrigue, this diary of an early 20th-century naturalist's struggle with depression and other maladies ranks among the most interesting and observant self-studies out there.

Also reading cookbooks, listening to recordings of Nabokov and skimming through other volumes, some of which I'll post on the side of my blog.

Edited by Spuffy

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I'm reading *a lot* of books for college, but I won't list those (too long of a list), so I'll list the one's I'm reading for fun.

I just finished the manga series Chrono Crusades books 1-7 - it was a great series! I didn't like how it ended though.

I'm finishing up The Power of Babel by John McWhorter - It's a book about language, and not one of his better ones. It's taken me a long time to get through this one, I liked his Doing Our Own Thing and Word on the Street better.

I'm also trudging through How Language Works by David Crystal - another book about (can you guess?) language. It's pretty interesting but somewhat dry. I liked his The Fight for English - How language pundits ate, shot, and left, which I finished a short time back.

When I'm not reading about language, I'm reading a book called With Charity Toward None: A Fond Look At Misanthropy by Florence King. It's pretty interesting.

I'm also nearly finished with a book called They Also Serve by Peter Kyne which was published in 1927 (if I'm reading the Roman Numbers right MCMXXVII). It's also interesting, but a little slow.

I just finished The Fuzzy Papers by H. Beam Piper again. That was fast reading because I've read them before. I love old sci-fi. Very neat to read how they used to think the future would turn out.

Guess I should stop all of this reading and study a bit huh? I actually only read a snatch here and a snatch there, and about a half an hour before I sleep. It helps settle the brain.

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My non-fiction is The Mindful Way Through Depression. Haven't gotten very far yet, but I like it.

I'm finishing up an 8-meeting over 16-week class based on this book taught by a local Buddhist lama (teacher). It's been an interesting journey. I like that the book comes with a meditation CD.

(OK, if your book didn't come with a CD, maybe I can help you get a copy.)

I've also just picked up A Piece of Normal from the library (our libraries are open again! HURRAY!) and Dressing for the Carnival... don't remember the authors right off hand. Both fiction.

Peace,

Wooster

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I'm reading "Secret Ingredients," a book of essays (and some fiction) about food, orginally published in the New Yorker magazine.

My bed side reading is Jane Austen. I'm reading "Northanger Abbey." I've read them all before, but familiar reading makes me sleepy. I can't take an exciting book upstairs or I would never sleep.

I'm also reading a fiction book called "Prague." I can't remember the author and I'm too lazy to get up and go look.

My local library system (it covers 5 counties) has a website where you can order materials, renew stuff, etc. They now have a list of your "reading history" so you can keep track of what you have taken out of the library. That's so cool for some of us who can't remember if we've read a book or not.

olga

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I am reading: The Collected Short Stories of William Trevor (which Tinneas may appreciate, because he's of Irish origin) . He may well be the greatest short story writer who is still living. I normally go in for non-fiction, mostly. But he's just so good at writing, I had to get his collection.

He's older, and he's been published since the 1950-60's, but he doesn't get a lot of publicity (although he's won numerous literary awards), so many probably haven't heard of him - unless they are a real literary connoissuer (which I'm not, I just read one of his stories in another collection, and now I am hooked on his stories). He's written tons of stories, and a few novels.

I really appreciate his short stories. His attitude is so mature, and non-defensive. Not judgmental, although he "Let's the chips fall where they may" re: What happens to his characters. His writing gives readers an "up close and personal view" of the characters in his stories, but he refrains (thankfully) from judgmentalism, letting the reader come to their own conclusions.

His decriptions of people are superb. So detailed in just the right places (to me), but not at all boring. His writing is like listening someone talk to you, in a normal conversation, IMO. There's always a "message" - but it's not "In your face", so to speak.

His stories are usually expanded character studies of people, that just describe their daily lives, and then, suddenly (or gradually) an unseemly event takes place (usually). Sometimes, though, they are just about the effect events have on people, even years after they happen.

I think he's great. I could read him all day long, if I had time. He used to get published in The New Yorker magazine a lot, but not so much lately.

- Susan

Edited by pleasemakeitstop

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I am reading: The Collected Short Stories of William Trevor
An anthology I own includes his "Kathleen's Field." Do you recommend that one?

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I haven't read that one, yet. But I will get it, on your recommendation. I really love Trevor.

I just finished the story titled: "A Complicated Nature" - which was excelllent. I also read: "An Afternoon" about a young girl neglected by her constantly brawling parents, who almost gives in to the attempted abduction of her, by a Pedophile, out of her sheer loneliness. Also excellent.

I also got his recent anthology titled: "Cheating at Canasta".

Nice to meet a fellow William Trevor reader!

- Susan

Edited by pleasemakeitstop

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My non-fiction is The Mindful Way Through Depression. Haven't gotten very far yet, but I like it.

I'm finishing up an 8-meeting over 16-week class based on this book taught by a local Buddhist lama (teacher). It's been an interesting journey. I like that the book comes with a meditation CD.

My book came with the CD also. Does sound like an interesting class.

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Madness by Marya Hornbacher, which I really like so far, though I am not bipolar, I always wanted to understand it better.

Anorexia Workbook by Michelle Heffner , this is good, and very helpful.

Regaining your self by Ira m. Sacker, I love it, pretty much shows how to use pirt to conquer your eating disorder

enchantment of the faerie realm by ted andrews.

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I read a lot and tend to have more then one book on the go:

Mental Health related

- Crazy by Pete Earley, basically the holes in the mental health system in the US especially when it comes to jails and prisons

- Girl Interrupted by Susana Kaysen, which reads a lot like a blog and one of the better personal mental health accounts I have read

Others

- Power of One by Bryce Courtenay, which I have read a few dozen times as it is an amazing book

- Blue Rage, Black Redemption by Stanley Williams, the co founder of the crips telling his life story, an interesting read

- Pale Horse Coming by Stephen Hunter, an entertaining book

take care

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[link=http://www.amazon.com/River-Doubt-Theodore-Roosevelts-Darkest/dp/0767913736/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1208581833&sr=8-1" target="_blank]River of Doubt

[/link]Especially entertaining after re-reading [link=http://www.amazon.com/Exuberance-Passion-Kay-Redfield-Jamison/dp/0375701486/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1208581877&sr=1-1" target="_blank]Exuberance [/link]recently - somewhere between inspiring and cautionary.

interesting. i finished jamison's an unquiet mind a few days ago. my reaction is similar to yours ... inspiring and cautionary. and something else ... longing. i hate to admit it, but when she describes the seductive allure of a manic tear, it's a little unnerving because i long for those "high flying adored" moments. i conveniently forget (or remember less distinctly) how easily that can self-destruct.

speaking of jamison ... anyone else irritated by her flagrant overuse of the word "mercurial"??? why couldn't her editor take a stand on that??? good word to use sparingly for maximum effectiveness.

i actually just finished reading the bell jar again. i still don't understand why everyone says it's such a depressing book. i simply don't see it.

i'm also in the midst of reading the joke by milan kundera. pre-exile kundera, i might add. his in-exile works lack that certain something that his writing had when he was in the belly of the beast. it's interesting to start comparing the works of kundera in the mid-late seventies to those of his contemporaries: klima, vaculik, hrabal (more or less contemporay? can i stretch it that far?? :) ) havel to name a few.

example: (imho)a cup of coffee with my interrogator by ludvik vaculik. one of my all time favorite collections of essays out of czechoslovakia in the bad old iron curtain days. the brutally critical (and certainly critical of his own hypocrisy) lens he examined his world with is almost a little too bleak and absurd. then again, i can't imagine that being an artist during the communist period was easy, no matter what sunshiny view you try to take of the world. i think of this collection as something of his attempt to purge his conscience when he was living in the thick of madness. how could you hold that all with a nod and a smile and another 5 year plan and slogan passed down by the politburo.

i'm just plain babbling now. i could easily live without certain conveniences as long as nobody tried to fuck with my books.

"Optimism is the opium of the people! A healthy atmosphere stinks of stupidity! Long live Trotsky!" ;)

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I'm currently reading THE ASSIGNMENT by Friedrich Durrenmatt. It's very short and I'm almost done with it. I don't recommend it though. I find it pretentious and silly. The only reason why I'm finishing it is because it's short, it's a mystery novel, and I have to finish a book by a 'D' author. Next on my list is ESPIRIT DE CORPS by Lawrence Durrell, then maybe finally I can move on to 'E' books. I feel bad though because I finished more 'A' and 'C' books than 'B' and 'D' books and was considering going back to 'B' to make it even, but then I would have to do that with 'D' and I would also have to read one more 'A' book and then... well I'd never make it to 'E', heh. For some odd reason I feel really guilty about it! My boyfriend told me at first he found this thing of mine cute and quirky. Now, not so much, heh. I think he might even be a bit worried. Oh well, I don't care ;P

I've put down so many 'D' books, it's quite ridiculous. THE END OF THE STORY by Lydia Davis (my last attempt at 'D' fiction) was too saccharine, too serious and too pretentious for words, so I really couldn't get past the first couple of chapters. If a book is going to take itself SO SERIOUSLY, it has to be AMAZING, otherwise I just think the author is a narcicisstic crock-pot.

For my 'E' books, I hope to start with IN THE NAME OF THE ROSE by Umberto Eco and NOTHING TO PAY by Caradoc Evans. Any recommendations for non-fiction 'E' books (the subject has to begin with an E, or if it's a biography/autobiography the person it's written about's last name. I know, I know.) and any for fiction and non-fiction 'F' books? I'm thinking finding a good non-fiction 'E' book is going to be hard.

Sorry this was so long!!!

Edited by Tinneas

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For my 'E' books, I hope to start with IN THE NAME OF THE ROSE by Umberto Eco

Sorry this was so long!!!

it's just "the name of the rose" or Il nome della rosa. it's a pretty interesting read. i found that it got a bit slow in the middle, but overall, decent. eco is a different breed. i kinda like him.

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Not hard at all!

"Einstein" by Walter Isaacson.

So, with fiction it's the first letter of the author's last name - but with non-fiction it's the subject? How does that work with say e.g. "wild animals"? Is that a "W" for wild or "A" for animals? And with biographies is it always last name or just the most 'used' name - like "Cher" (purely used as example!!! ;) )

And why, if you want to cover more than 4 letters of the alphabet, don't you have a limit on the number of each letter?

Wouldn't it be better (whatever "better" means) to read one or 2 "As", then one or 2 "Bs" etc.?

Your system is not quite clear to me.

(No wonder your BF is questioning the "cute and quirky"! :) )

I think you'll like Eco.

Not to be critical, but with all the known good authors how were you selecting some of the works you mentioned? (Though I think you may also like Durrell. - I haven't read "Esprit de Corps", though. What I read was a long time ago and I don't remember what it was. Just has a positive association in my mind.)

Edited by [email protected]

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