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There are a lot of really excellent articles at http://www.goodtherapy.org/explore-therapy.html

on what ethical and good therapy looks like, and how to tell if you have a "good" therapist. 

 

I encourage a gander over there.

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Hi. Still think you should pin this one so that it doesn't get lost in the stream of posts. There was a time when info there would have saved me from some bad therapy.

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This is a really helpful site ... Thanks!

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Thank you. This is really helpful to me at the moment.

Edit. Let me rephrase that. This is really helpful to me with some questions I have at the moment. I suspect its usefulness will live on when the current situation has been resolved one way or another.

Edited by Mim

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Oh yes.  Lots of very different things can shelter under one set of initials... There's a need to be able to spot the difference between the good and bad stuff.

 

In Chronic Fatigue Syndrome there is "CBT":  to help people check if they have mentally adapted to their new health condition with no *unnecessary* stress, pain or difficulty.  A check for modes of thinking that are not helping, and ideas for ones that might be more useful, or give access to better coping strategies,

 

And then there's "CBT": to persuade people that they only think they are ill, and that its their negative thoughts that are trapping and limiting them, and that a cure requires and will follow a more positive attitude and more physical avtivity

(and just to lay it on, any lack of improvement is obviously due to failure to maintain a sufficiently positive and can-do pattern of thoughts and behaviour.)

 

One label, two drastically distinct entities.

 

I've seen the very much the same with approaches to "social skills  classes" in autism.

 

Chris.

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And then there's "CBT": to persuade people that they only think they are ill, and that its their negative thoughts that are trapping and limiting them, and that a cure requires and will follow a more positive attitude and more physical avtivity

(and just to lay it on, any lack of improvement is obviously due to failure to maintain a sufficiently positive and can-do pattern of thoughts and behaviour.)

 

This type of logic with therapy is the absolute bane of my existence. My last encounter with group therapy has just about soured me on it altogether.

And it feels like a "trend" right now is discounting how important medication can be to someone's treatment. Maybe it does have to do with overprescribing for situations that probably should be dealt with therapy and not drugs, but it creates this logic upon the masses that if you need the drugs, you're somehow "lazy" and not willing to "do the work" that comes along with therapy.

I felt very pressured to come up with and react to a series of platitudes and revelations around me that were new and exciting to me when I was six, if ever. 

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That sounds like awful, awful CBT. A CBT counsellor should be flexible, right? Thinking positive isn't for everyone, you wouldn't tell Seneca to think positive! and that doctrine, that all emotions are caused by thoughts, is just that, doctrine, and any decent counsellor will see that as a metaphor, not an actual practical reality! Surely! I wouldn't throw out a whole methodology because some people treat it like a dogma, I've found it so helpful for certain stuff.

There are loads of studies showing that the medication + therapy combo has the best outcome for the most people. It's so mad that anyone would just dismiss medication.. I mean isn't part of CBT the idea that "there is no good or bad but thinking makes it so" and then they turn around and tell you "no, you are thinking wrong, and that's bad"... ha ha!

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Just like it takes a while to find the right pdoc and like it takes a while to find the right med cocktail, it takes a while to find the right therapist. If yours EVER discounts medication and makes you feel lazy, you need to get a new one. 

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