iwishididnthaveanhedonia

losing weight- any ideas?

62 posts in this topic

so right now im about 180lbs at 5'8. that puts me in the obese category although I honestly don't feel obese.

anyway, my clothes are no longer fitting me and i dont have the money to revamp my entire wardrobe so i am now desperate to lose weight.

any suggestions?

i went on very short jogs twice in these last three days so i guess thats a good start, but does anyone have any other ideas?

im currently on metformin and am trying to stick to my twice a day (500mg each) regimen. also, just so you know, im not a very fit person - and huff and puff after like 2 minutes of jogging :(

so yeah, suggestions please?

edit: im not looking for a magic pill, just any regimen that may have worked for you or anyone you know

Edited by iwishididnthaveanhedonia

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My main advice is to get rid of the sugar in what you eat (easier said than done).  Sugar from fruit is ok because the fiber and nutrients keep it from spiking your sugar levels.  Getting rid of grains is another thing, but that is really hard to do, IMO.  I've read so much abotu this.

If you go to mercola.com, and search for "sugar and weight" or anything similar and articles will come up that you can read.  Mercola.com has a lot of information about sugar and weight.

Or google 'diet and sugar' or anything like that and articles that have to do with sugar and weight loss.

 

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31 minutes ago, melissaw72 said:

My main advice is to get rid of the sugar in what you eat (easier said than done).  Sugar from fruit is ok because the fiber and nutrients keep it from spiking your sugar levels.  Getting rid of grains is another thing, but that is really hard to do, IMO.  I've read so much abotu this.

If you go to mercola.com, and search for "sugar and weight" or anything similar and articles will come up that you can read.  Mercola.com has a lot of information about sugar and weight.

Or google 'diet and sugar' or anything like that and articles that have to do with sugar and weight loss.

 

ill look into it! thanks melissa

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I agree that getting rid of excess sugar is a good starting point. However, fats are much more calorie dense (9 cal./gr) than carbohydrates (including sugar). If you want to lose weight, watch the fat content of what you eat. I lost a lot of weight actually by eating carbohydrates (pasta) and cutting fat down to the barest minimum.

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I've been losing weight using a combination of 16:8 fasting* and a diet of no grains, no sugar, and no alcohol. I also avoid vegetable oils. I eat potatoes fairly frequently, as well as fair amount of fruit every day. I do not worry if a condiment or sauce has a little sugar in it. I don't count calories, carbs, or fat, or worry about how much I eat. I've lost over 60 pounds so far. I started by cutting back on alcohol. Then I ditched alcohol altogether and added 16:8 fasting. But after a while I got stuck, and so I added the no grains/no sugar part. 

Recently I got off track, eating some ice cream every day. It was supposed to be just a weekly treat. Oops. That stalled my weight loss, but I'm not gaining either, and I've eaten quite a bit of ice cream. I need to get back to business. Before the lapse, I was losing about 0.2 pounds per day, on average.

I tried juicing, briefly. I lost about 3/4 pound per day on that, but it is a challenging diet to maintain. I also worried about my body catabolizing muscle tissue for protein. But I might turn to it again to drop the last few pounds, if they prove to be stubborn. I'll probably try a very low carb diet before going there again, however.

*This is where you only eat during an 8-hour window each day. Some people do six hours, or even fewer. I simply skip breakfast, which is not hard for me because I do not usually get hungry in the morning. Some people do better by skipping dinner.

Edited by Flash

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4 hours ago, jt07 said:

I agree that getting rid of excess sugar is a good starting point. However, fats are much more calorie dense (9 cal./gr) than carbohydrates (including sugar). If you want to lose weight, watch the fat content of what you eat. I lost a lot of weight actually by eating carbohydrates (pasta) and cutting fat down to the barest minimum.

but dont you end up eating more if your diet just consists of carbs and no fat? carbs are used immediately for energy while for the fat you'll have to wait a little longer for it to kick in energy wise. i think i learned in health class that fat can help you feel fuller for longer because of that

2 hours ago, Flash said:

I've been losing weight using a combination of 16:8 fasting* and a diet of no grains, no sugar, and no alcohol. I also avoid vegetable oils. I eat potatoes fairly frequently, as well as fair amount of fruit every day. I do not worry if a condiment or sauce has a little sugar in it. I don't count calories, carbs, or fat, or worry about how much I eat. I've lost over 60 pounds so far. I started by cutting back on alcohol. Then I ditched alcohol altogether and added 16:8 fasting. But after a while I got stuck, and so I added the no grains/no sugar part. 

Recently I got off track, eating some ice cream every day. It was supposed to be just a weekly treat. Oops. That stalled my weight loss, but I'm not gaining either, and I've eaten quite a bit of ice cream. I need to get back to business. Before the lapse, I was losing about 0.2 pounds per day, on average.

I tried juicing, briefly. I lost about 3/4 pound per day on that, but it is a challenging diet to maintain. I also worried about my body catabolizing muscle tissue for protein. But I might turn to it again to drop the last few pounds, if they prove to be stubborn. I'll probably try a very low carb diet before going there again, however.

*This is where you only eat during an 8-hour window each day. Some people do six hours, or even fewer. I simply skip breakfast, which is not hard for me because I do not usually get hungry in the morning. Some people do better by skipping dinner.

this is interesting! ive also heard of that 8-hour rule recently as well. dont know if i have the discipline to just eat within that time window (aka i find it hard to ignore my appetite)

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Well,  I controlled my calories. As I mentioned above, fats are 9 calories/gr. whereas carbohydrates are (I think) 5 calories/gr. So I could afford to eat more if I avoided fats. That way I never felt deprived. I ate lots of pasta, but then I love Italian food so it all worked well. No, I did not eat a lot more fruits and vegetables.

I will admit that I followed a fairly strict diet using the above facts together with what I know from basic physics. I had one day a week which was a free day, that is, I could eat whatever I wanted and did not control calories on that day.

I lost 100 lbs. on this diet.

I'm not in anyway saying that it is for everyone because it was very strict, and you really need to consult a doctor or nutritionist before starting any diet to be safe.

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13 minutes ago, jt07 said:

Well,  I controlled my calories. As I mentioned above, fats are 9 calories/gr. whereas carbohydrates are (I think) 5 calories/gr. So I could afford to eat more if I avoided fats. That way I never felt deprived. I ate lots of pasta, but then I love Italian food so it all worked well. No, I did not eat a lot more fruits and vegetables.

I will admit that I followed a fairly strict diet using the above facts together with what I know from basic physics. I had one day a week which was a free day, that is, I could eat whatever I wanted and did not control calories on that day.

I lost 100 lbs. on this diet.

I'm not in anyway saying that it is for everyone because it was very strict, and you really need to consult a doctor or nutritionist before starting any diet to be safe.

hm, interesting. can i ask what about physics helped you with this diet?

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Simple physics. Conservation of Energy. Treat the body as a black box. Then

calories expended (eg exercise) + calories used to maintain the body (i.e. just to be alive) - caloric intake = calorie deficit

You want the calorie deficit to be positive. Negative calorie deficit means adding weight.

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Moving to "weight gain" in the Side Effects forum.

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5 hours ago, jt07 said:

I agree that getting rid of excess sugar is a good starting point. However, fats are much more calorie dense (9 cal./gr) than carbohydrates (including sugar). If you want to lose weight, watch the fat content of what you eat. I lost a lot of weight actually by eating carbohydrates (pasta) and cutting fat down to the barest minimum.

It depends on the kinds of fats a person eats.  The fat from processed foods is the bad fat, but the healthy fats from avocado, nuts. seeds, coconut oil, eggs, etc might actually help weight loss.  Here are some links about it:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/557726-eat-fat-to-burn-fat/

(^^although I don't agree with looking at caloric intake)

http://drhyman.com/blog/2016/01/08/why-fat-doesnt-make-you-fat/

http://drhyman.com/blog/2015/12/27/separating-fat-from-fiction-10-fat-facts-you-need-to-know/

If you google, "why eating fat doesn't make you fat" there are lots more links explaining it.

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Me endo gave me a diet that works for women called the "Yes Diet"   The idea is that its the easiest doable diet.  It goes something like this (Duckduckgo.com it)

5 servings of fruits and or vegtables   *Check serving size its not 5 plates full its actually not a huge amount.

8??  "Glasses" of water.  Again its not a giant Bugs Bunny sippy cup size its more like a cup.

30 grams?? of fiber.  This can be done a variety of different ways.   Put some fiber jazz in something you blend like if you do smoothies or whatever.  Fiber Cookies are actually pretty good but not every day.

*All of these amounts are probably wrong but - look it up and check it out because if you do the three things then you eat regular stuff.  In other words "Can I eat _______?" Yes...   I asked her if my SO could eat birthcake three times a day and the doc said do the three things and eat whatever.  

Now, she put me on a diet for men that worked that was about as easy and I lost almost 100lbs.

Within an hour of waking eat proteans *Selxed? such as egg, meat, cheese etc.  Eat a big breakfast.  Do whatever you do for lunch and then avoid eating after 6 PM and if you have any will power at all back off on the evening chow fest. 

It sounds weird but the man diet is all engo metobolism magic not all the counting calories etc that men won't ever do for more then a couple weeks.   She told me don't tell women about the man diet it totally won't work for them.

My personal advice is to not obsess on the scale.  Check out whats going on monthly.   The goal is not to crash diet thus screwing yourself up but to gradually dial down.   Its also more likely you will stay at a good BMI not yo yo up and down which is bad for you.

I hope that is of some help

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Sorry, melissa, I don't believe that. Some fats are better for you than others for sure, but when it comes to losing weight, a fat is a fat.

There is a lot of psuedoscience when it comes to dieting mechanisms that I could write a whole book on it. It really is as simple as basic physics (conservation of energy).

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3 minutes ago, jt07 said:

Sorry, melissa, I don't believe that. Some fats are better for you than others for sure, but when it comes to losing weight, a fat is a fat.

There is a lot of psuedoscience when it comes to dieting mechanisms that I could write a whole book on it. It really is as simple as basic physics (conservation of energy).

I guess we'll have to agree to disagree on this.

---------

I agree with Hal to get rid of the scale.

Edited by melissaw72

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On April 18, 2016 at 9:45 PM, jt07 said:

Simple physics. Conservation of Energy. Treat the body as a black box. Then

calories expended (eg exercise) + calories used to maintain the body (i.e. just to be alive) - caloric intake = calorie deficit

You want the calorie deficit to be positive. Negative calorie deficit means adding weight.

Not many obesity researchers believe in the calories-in, calories-out model nowadays. The body is a complex system and fat accumulation is regulated by leptin, insulin, grehlin, glucagon, CCK, peptide yy, GLP-1 and a variety of other factors in a system whose chief defining feature is homeostasis. The simplistic calorie balance model does not account for any of this. Moreover, if the calorie balance model held, trivially small caloric imbalances would aggregate to considerable weight loss or weight gain over time. People simply aren't capable of estimating their calories with the kind of precision that would be necessary to prevent them from wasting away or becoming obese if that model held.

Furthermore, certain surgical modifications can induce weight gain or weigh loss, independent of calories consumed. There are also certain medical conditions that will do the same. If it was all about calories, such would not be the case. Interestingly, studies with low-fat and low-carb diets typically show one diet outperforming the other, even under isocaloric conditions. Usually it is the low-carb diet taking top honors, although one notable study that was very carefully controlled showed the opposite. Either way, the results defy the calories-in, calories-out model.

Then there's the thermic effect of food. Different macronutrients are metabolized differently, with protein taking considerably more energy to metabolize than either carbohydrate or fat (with fat taking the least amount of energy). Burning food in a calorimeter to ascertain its energy content does not account for this difference. The first law of thermodynamics explains the calorimeter reading, but the second law—conveniently ignored by the calorie balance model—explains the thermic effect of food. Another thing worth noting while we're on the subject of thermodynamics is that the body is not a closed system and not all food is metabolized. This can be seen in diabetic patients who excrete sugar in their urine (diabetes mellitus actually means 'sweet urine'). That's energy that has simply passed through the system. Yet the calorie balance model does not account for this, assuming instead that those sugar calories were converted to energy or deposited in adipose tissue. Likewise, alcoholics consuming massive amounts of alcohol (7 calories/gram) can pass thousands of calories a day without converting it to fat. I discovered this for myself. According to the calorie calculus, I should have weighed over a ton, yet I came nowhere remotely near that. 

This is not to say that calories don't matter, as you can reliably induce short-term weight loss or weight gain by altering the the calories consumed by a sufficient amount. But the body will generally attempt to return to its homeostatic set point after the intervention ceases. And beyond a certain point, the body will resist continued weight loss despite further caloric restriction. This was demonstrated during the Minnesota Starvation Experiment during WWII. The reverse has also been shown. The trick is to change the set point. Exactly how to do this is done is the subject of debate. What we do know is that simple caloric restriction has a very poor track record for long-term weight loss, with typical results being the regaining of all the weight, sometimes with a little extra to boot. Diets in general have generally performed poorly in studies of long-term weight loss, however.

 

Edited by Flash

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I'm 5'9 and weigh 196 pounds (THANK YOU, REMERON!).  Last week I lost 8.8 pounds and although I'm sure much of it was water weight, this is what I'm doing.

1.  Drink two protein shakes a day that are around 200 calories or less.

 

2.  Eat two meals that equal 250 calories and have at least 10 grams of protein

 

3.  Have 5 servings of fruits and veggies (2 fruits and 3 veggies, ideally)

 

4.  Drink 8 glasses of water

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9 hours ago, melissaw72 said:

It depends on the kinds of fats a person eats.  The fat from processed foods is the bad fat, but the healthy fats from avocado, nuts. seeds, coconut oil, eggs, etc might actually help weight loss.  Here are some links about it:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/557726-eat-fat-to-burn-fat/

(^^although I don't agree with looking at caloric intake)

http://drhyman.com/blog/2016/01/08/why-fat-doesnt-make-you-fat/

http://drhyman.com/blog/2015/12/27/separating-fat-from-fiction-10-fat-facts-you-need-to-know/

If you google, "why eating fat doesn't make you fat" there are lots more links explaining it.

Actually there is similar evidence to this in studies done recently on full fat dairy products. I saw Dr. OZ discussing how he recommends full fat dairy now and he explained the studies. I did a quick Google and found and article discussing this. Dr. Oz was just on the Today a week or so ago giving his recommendation. Of course talk with your doctor.

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2014/02/12/275376259/the-full-fat-paradox-whole-milk-may-keep-us-lean

Edited by snarkygirl

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Throwing my two cents in. Want to say first, I am NOT advocating it, but I lost 45 pounds following Atkins, to the point where friends were becoming concerned about my being so thin. However, like any specific, hardcore diet that banishes some food groups and encouraging others, it's difficult to follow. I was obsessive about it at first, then slowly starting adding back foods, which quite frankly set off cravings, and well, falling off that wagon was not good. Gained it all back.

What I would really recommend is simply portion and common sense control. I try to eat healthy when I can, though not stringent about it. Brown rice instead of white, Dreamfield pasta instead of regular (it's low carb), don't be stupid with cream-based sauces, etc etc. I tend to eat more veggies this time of year, the fruit selection isn't that good. There's a saying of "eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper". Even after cooking for an hour or more at night, I usually only eat a few bites. Leftovers for breakfast are awesome. 

Dont get me wrong, the pounds aren't exactly melting off this way, but I've lost ten pounds without trying over the past three months, and that's with seroquel on board. 

I just think that restrictive diets are great for short term, but not much more.

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this is a lot of interesting information, thanks everyone. ill try to look at the links as soon as i get the chance and reply to all of your responses

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15 hours ago, Rachel48 said:

I'm 5'9 and weigh 196 pounds (THANK YOU, REMERON!).  Last week I lost 8.8 pounds and although I'm sure much of it was water weight, this is what I'm doing.

1.  Drink two protein shakes a day that are around 200 calories or less.

 

2.  Eat two meals that equal 250 calories and have at least 10 grams of protein

 

3.  Have 5 servings of fruits and veggies (2 fruits and 3 veggies, ideally)

 

4.  Drink 8 glasses of water

Just add the fiber and you have the yes diet.   I'm told for men the protein within one hour of waking is some kind of metabilic thing.  Edoc told me if I don't cram some protein within an hour of waking the body goes into "Store all fat" mode. 

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I'm losing weight on Risperidone by doing very low carb, basically putting myself into ketosis. I'm losing about a half pound per day (but I am also technically obese so weight loss goes faster than normal I think). 

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In December I was 172 lbs and I'm 5'7", and was categorized as "Obese". I was surprised to be labeled Obese, but it's based on how high your body fat percentage is compared to your total weight. In reality, the terms "obese" and "morbidly obese" are pretty stigmatized and not what people think it is, and my body fat was well over it should have been.

Since December I lost 13 lbs, which doesn't seem like much, but lost 7% of body fat (which is good). I honestly didn't do any neat diets or fads, I just stuck to the basics.

I cut out refined sugar/simple carbs, all sodas and carbonated drinks, as well as processed foods. I now stick to proteins, fresh veggies, good proteins, and LOTS of water. I cut out all red meat for now, and eat mostly fish, chicken, ground turkey, and some pork. I eat a lot of protein because it keeps me full and using better energy than sugars or simple carbs. I agree that pastas and other complex carbs are beneficial, especially after you use a lot of energy (like during exercise) because it gives you energy and feeds your muscles. Also eating 5 smaller meals a day (or 3 small to medium meals and 2 snacks) has helped me stay full and energized throughout the day.

My exercise started simple, you don't have to go out and jog to see results. I HATE running or jogging, you definitely aren't alone! I recommend stretched every morning (to help blood flow) whether you exercise or not (of course stretch before exercise always). I walked 1 to 2 miles 3 times a week, and did simple exercises like crunches, 20 minutes on the elliptical, squats. Starting out "small" helped me get into more intense workouts and gave me the ability to do more and last longer during those workouts.

TBH Pinterest has been my friend. Pinning easy and healthy means, exercises to try, and even motivational quotes has made eating and living healthy a bit easier. I'm still trying to lose body fat and tone my muscles, but my main concern was always doing something that I could keep to for the rest of my life; not just lose weight and gain it back. So far I've seen a lot of positive change in my energy levels, mood, that constant feeling of crappiness, and how I feel about myself as a whole (despite the slow changing numbers on the scale).

ETA
I also wanted to say that my mentality has been pretty simple (and ironically I just said something about it). My goal every day is to eat less CRAP (C) carbonated drinks (R) refined sugar (A) artificial swetener and colors (P) processed foods and eat more FOOD (F) fruits and vegetables (O) organic lean proteins (O) omega 3 fatty acids (D) drink water.

Keeping it day to day makes it an easier fight. Also making exercise schedules and meal plans for the week is SUPER helpful and kept me on goal pretty well.

Edited by Sloane
Added CRAP.

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My diet is restricted due to allergies anyway, but my gp actually recommends the ketogenic diet. I find that when I'm on it the weight melts off and I feel amazing, my skin is clear and I have a tonne of energy. This is a big read, but it's the complete breakdown of the science: http://josepharcita.blogspot.com.au/2011/03/guide-to-ketosis.html?m=1#33MM

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