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Can Pharmacy Call your doc?

10 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

OK:

I am really pissed off about my pharmacy right now and wondering if I have a legal leg to stand on. I brought in a prescription dated and signed that day by my doctor. The insurance company rejected it because it was early, but I thought my doctor had ok'd the early pick up. His nurse had told me in a conversation three days prior that upon my visit he would write me a script a few days early.

I explained this to my pharmacy and they in turn, called my doctor(without my knowledge) who realized that he had given me the meds too early. I am new to this doctor and we have started off poorly. I had just left his office where we had straightened out a bunch of these issues and I was feeling good about my visit, I really thought that he meant for me to fill the prescription, even though it was early and add it to what I had.

Edited by Breeze

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Posted

With all this privacy crap you sign now, can the pharmacy just call the doctor without you knowing? Does anyone know anything about this? I have been going to this pharmacy for years and the little bitch that set me up has to see my face tomorrow (or not) and I want to know my rights before I talk to the owner.

ANY ADVICE????

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Yes. The pharmacy can call your doctor without your permission. I've had that happen many times.

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Posted (edited)

If your Rx was a pain killer, if it was any kind of narcotic pain killer, then a pharmacist may call your doctor to confirm the Rx due to being paranoid. Why? Pain killers these days are being watched very carefully by the DEA, especially oxycotin. So many doctors and pharmacists are very careful in documenting/confirming an Rx before it is dispensed. For some of the Schedule II subtances a Rx has to be written in triplicate (carbonless copies) so that one stays with the doctor, one goes to the pharmacist, and in some states one copy is saved on file or goes to the DEA in order to keep track of doctors and pharmacists who are writing and filling Rxs. So it may not have been just about you getting an early refill, it could also be a case of the pharmacist wanting to cover his ass. 

I had to speak with a DEA agaent because one of the patients said that her GP was giving her large amounts of oxycotin. I had no choice but to bring the information to the DEA's attention, or the doc I was working for could have got in trouble. The patient's name was kept confidential but not the GPs name. The GP was later arrested but not before he nearly lost his mind having to detox himself cold turkey from oxycotin because he could no longer write illegal Rxs to feed his own habit.

So it may just be due to the policing of narcortics these days.

Erika

Edited by Erika

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Posted

So the DEA is especially monitoring medications containing oxycodone (Percocet, OxyContin, Percodan) because they are Schedule II narcotics.

So what happens?  Prescriptions for hydrocodone (Vicodin) have been on the rise.  As a matter of fact, Vicodin is the most commonly prescribed pill for pain (and most commonly abused).

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Posted

So the DEA is especially monitoring medications containing oxycodone (Percocet, OxyContin, Percodan) because they are Schedule II narcotics.

So what happens?  Prescriptions for hydrocodone (Vicodin) have been on the rise.  As a matter of fact, Vicodin is the most commonly prescribed pill for pain (and most commonly abused).

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Just writing what I know from personal experience and a very uncomfortable interview with a DEA agent. I don't know what is going to happen to other pain killers or their abuse factor. It was just soem FYI

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Posted

It was probably due to the insurance not accepting an early refill.  It's not illegal at all for a pharmacy to check in with the doctor when they're unsure about things relating to a prescription.  Don't worry too much about it.  Ask the pharmacy why they called your doctor, and/or ask your doctor about it.  It's usually a problem between any combination of the pharmacy, your doctor, or your insurance.  Unfortunately there are too many anal rules that they must adhere to and check up on with each other.

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Posted

I'm more concerned with your pdoc screaming at you. How has that worked out?

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Posted (edited)

.

Edited by MiaB

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Posted

Our HIPPA rights are non existent; they read essentially, we pharmacists can't violate your rights unless we feel like it.  Honestly, pharmacists are more of a problem than the police force; my dying father (lung cancer) was red flagged as a doctor shopper bc the Pharmacists (note: NOT a DR with oncology training) decided the doctor had written too high a script.  There are tons of good pharmacists out there but if you think you have the right to violate HIPPA (which you have made into toilet paper-some pharmacists) because you are so smart, why didn't you learn some medicine to actually help people.  Seems like an incredible inferiority complex, like you are always trying to second guess the doc.

 

I especially love the argument of yeah I violated your rights but its ok bc it involves narcotics.  Frankly, I do not know that I would be upset if we abolished HIPPA; it's already worthless.  You have no rights if you are on PM.  Sorry to ramble but it is so arrogant for a pharmacist to think that they know more than the doctors that trained longer!  There is no "upper ceiling" to opiate tolerance.  Anyone in the business to take away these illusionary rights we have should not be a pharmacist.  A Pharma has few jobs; dispense meds, work with insurance, and double check that lethal doses may not have accidentally been written by doc.  That's all!!!  Sorry Guys 

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Posted (edited)

Our HIPPA rights are non existent; they read essentially, we pharmacists can't violate your rights unless we feel like it.  Honestly, pharmacists are more of a problem than the police force; my dying father (lung cancer) was red flagged as a doctor shopper bc the Pharmacists (note: NOT a DR with oncology training) decided the doctor had written too high a script.  There are tons of good pharmacists out there but if you think you have the right to violate HIPPA (which you have made into toilet paper-some pharmacists) because you are so smart, why didn't you learn some medicine to actually help people.  Seems like an incredible inferiority complex, like you are always trying to second guess the doc.

 

I especially love the argument of yeah I violated your rights but its ok bc it involves narcotics.  Frankly, I do not know that I would be upset if we abolished HIPPA; it's already worthless.  You have no rights if you are on PM.  Sorry to ramble but it is so arrogant for a pharmacist to think that they know more than the doctors that trained longer!  There is no "upper ceiling" to opiate tolerance.  Anyone in the business to take away these illusionary rights we have should not be a pharmacist.  A Pharma has few jobs; dispense meds, work with insurance, and double check that lethal doses may not have accidentally been written by doc.  That's all!!!  Sorry Guys

Pharmacists are actually trained better in how medications work and interact with each other. When I have a complex question about my medications and how they interact, I call my pharmacist first.

 

I have great trust in my doctors because they are more familiar with what medications will be better suited to treat my conditions.

 

I have great trust in my pharmacist because they are more familiar with how medications interact, what contraindications to be aware of and what to be aware of when starting a new medication.

 

My mother has her master's in gerontological nursing and my uncle is a pharmacist, they both always have recommended this strategy and it has never failed me- my doctors often feel this way as well.  When I talk to my pharmacist [the actual pharmacist, not one of their assistants] he pretty much never has to look at a PDR.  When I have talked to my psychiatrist about complex interactions or similar, they often have to look at a PDR or similar reference.

 

A pharmacist does much more than you think, and you should be really thankful if you find a good one.

 

 

EDITED: This is a necro thread. Fucking shit, still leaving the other stuff because it's worthwhile info anyway.

Edited by LunaRufina

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