unknown diagnosis

The good doctor

17 posts in this topic

Personally im not autistic but I do have OCD, and I find that by being mentally ill I can relate to the main character in the show (I can go into detail about this if you guys want). It is a great show and I definitely recommend watching it if your either mentally ill/ into doctor shows. Has anyone watched this? Do you think the show will go beyond focusing on his disability and focus more on his genius level skills?

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Being autistic isn't a disability, and in general the whole stereotype that we are all geniuses is incorrect. We are like everyone else, some of us can be a genius, some of us cannot. 

I'm sick of hearing about it, seeing it and so forth. So typical that the media puts out extreme possibilities of something, but why would they make a TV show about an every day average autistic person? That doesn't make any money. 

Personally, I have seen multiple things in the media about autistic people, and all of them were about geniuses, savants, or only showed the stereotypical "classical autism". I think it is bad for our community to only portray these. 

But that is just my opinion. 

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First off I would like to apologize to you hopeless, I thought all chronic illnesses were disabilities to some degrees. Also I can see how a show like that would be offensive to someone with autism, since it does show that autism makes you a "suffering genius", which, isn't the case for everyone, and I completely forgot to acknowledge that in my post.

Now the reason I think its interesting is because first of all when I was younger I used to watch House with my dad, good times, and a great show. Ever since then I fell in love with doctor shows, and now that there is another show about someone who also has a diagnosis and is a genius at the same time is really exciting to me, because I come from a family that used to stigmatize mental illness (not so much autism as I was friendly with a low functioning autistic child when I was a kid). Now when I see the show I see a huge contrast from what im used to seeing and believing about diagnoses that can have a certain negative effect on people lives. When my brain melted about three years ago and I developed anxiety depression and OCD, whenever I saw someone similar to me I only got to see them in mental institutes, not doing well at all. But when I see this show, I see someone who is high functioning and has had his fair share of hardships because of his illness, and is now doing very well and is extremely intelligent.

Anyways, that's why I like the show. If I offended anyone with my previous post I am really sorry, but I hope I've cleared up the reason why I like the show.

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It isn't a chronic illness either. I'm not even going to bother wasting my energy on explaining. 

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Keep in mind that this show is fiction. Everything is sensationalized and glamorized. A couple of years ago there was a show called "The Black Box" about a doctor who had bipolar disorder. That show was ridiculously unreal.

However, as HB said, autism is not a chronic mental illness. It's not an illness at all. And it's not a pathway to genius nor is it necessarily a pathway to being handicapped. People with autism run the spectrum.

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Autism is neurological. The most consistent trait is difficulties with social interactions. It’s hard for us to people.

This is pretty decent information:

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/autism-spectrum-disorders-asd/index.shtml

Never look to Autism Speaks, or I will find a way to bite you through my screen.

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Posted (edited)

Ok i tried to be civil but what the fuck? Autism isnt chronic? Im not even going to fight you on this, ill just cite my source:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autism

"There is no known cure.[4][11] Children recover occasionally, so that they lose their diagnosis of ASD;[13] this occurs sometimes after intensive treatment and sometimes not. It is not known how often recovery happens;" 

It says children recover occasionally, but that dosent mean its not all of a sudden magically not a chronic illness

Also @Hopelessly Broken how is it not a disability? Yes i can understand in alot of cases its not a disability, but what about the people who cant communicate with their words? Isnt that a disability? Now i may be wrong that autism is a disability, and if i am please feel free to tell me why rather than saying something like:

1 hour ago, Hopelessly Broken said:

It isn't a chronic illness either. I'm not even going to bother wasting my energy on explaining. 

Maybe try and educate me? 

Also by the way sorry to say but if your autism has lasted more than three months it is infact chronic:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chronic_condition

"The term chronic is often applied when the course of the disease lasts for more than three months"

If you feel otherwise feel free to explain to me why im wrong. Im always open to learning something new ^_^

Edited by unknown diagnosis
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Posted (edited)

Are you serious? Are you trying to use this fictional glamorization and sensationalization of autism by this show to somehow bask in it to make your mental illness seem somehow sexy? I'm not sure what your motive here is to belabor this point when you don't in fact have autism.

Also, Wikipedia is not scientific literature. It is a poor reference because the articles may not even be written by experts and are not peer reviewed. 

Edited by jt07

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Posted (edited)

It isn't a chronic illness or a disability because it is a neurotype. Meaning that our brain is simply a different type than the one that a neurotypical person has. The autistic traits that we have are in fact normal for our neurotype. 

Next, functionality for us in a clinical sense doesn't equal entire functionality. A high functioning autistic doesn't have less traits than someone with a lower functioning level. They just present differently. 

This is because the assessments used to make a diagnosis don't include many aspects of our lives. The assessments are based off of social skills, communication, intellect, sensory issues, repetitive or routine behaviours and motor function. 

For example, I, an Aspie, don't have less traits because I am an Aspie. I have the same ones that someone with lower functioning autism does, they just express themselves differently. Overall the basis of my traits are the same, I have less social skills and less interest in socialisation, I have issues with communication, communication isn't just speaking, I have both extremes of sensory processing and perception differences and I have fine and gross motor skill deficits.

I refuse to subject myself to people who try to shove some nonsense that my brain is a disease. It isn't. Yes, undeniably, sometimes the traits can cause problems, and impair on every day tasks. However I find that the worst part of being autistic is dealing with stigma and anti vaxxers, pressure to conform and be like people who are simply not like me at all at a cellular level. 

 

Edited by Hopelessly Broken

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16 minutes ago, jt07 said:

Are you serious? Are you trying to use this fictional glamorization and sensationalization of autism by this show to somehow bask in it to make your mental illness seem somehow sexy? I'm not sure what your motive here is to belabor this point when you don't in fact have autism.

Also, Wikipedia is not scientific literature. It is a poor reference because the articles may not even be written by experts and are not peer reviewed. 

Im literally just saying i like a show because it portrays someone whos different than others in a good light, and, as i said before its a doctor show. I dont see the problem with that. And whats wrong with trying to see positives in a mental illness? Especially since all ive seen so far is suffering. I dont see what i said that was so wrong?

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Posted (edited)

Because autism isn't an illness. As has been said.  

 

Edited by Hopelessly Broken

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Like Hopelessly Broken stated above-  autism is not a mental illness. Please stop categorising it as such. It is a difference in neurology. Meaning my brain is hardwired differently as an autistic person than the brain of a non-autistic person. 

 

 

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In my country autism is recognized as a disability. For me it's an euphemism to say it isn't one. If I need to talk about it at work I wouldn't call it a disability in other places I would...

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Autism is also or can be recognised as a disability here in the UK. By law a disorder is recognised individually as a disability if it impedes the person's quality of life in some manner, such as making it harder to complete every day tasks or people generally struggle to understand you. 

As someone who is autistic I can get fed up at the autistic community as well as the ones on the outside trying to understand the condition - or think they understand it. The reason I get fed up at the autistic community is because it seems to very easy to offend someone. You know, some people find the puzzle piece upsetting, some have problems with how you refer to an autistic person (is it 'person with autism' or 'autistic person'), blah. BLAH. But make no mistake I tire when people mistake it for an illness or that recovery is somehow possible especially when they think natural "alternatives" are useful. Fuck off with that shite.

I also get it that people want to normalise it as a different way of being, and in some cases it is. However, it does in a lot of cases impede a person's ability to live with other people so I think generally speaking it should be looked upon as a disability because if it doesn't then the seriousness of the condition isn't being recognised; there are a lot of people who need supported living who are still classed as "high functioning", if they decided to view it no longer as a disability then a lot of people could find themselves without the proper support because their needs will not be recognised any more.

As regards with the programme, I haven't watched it. If it does get a viewing over on this side of the pond - and not paying bloody Netflix's just inflated prices for it then I may well do it. I'd probably take it with a grain of salt in terms of how the character is portrayed, as one minority within the autistic minority. Whatever. To a degree it's good that autistic is getting normalised. What would be better if they consulted some autistic people for an accurate representation. But of course, I haven't seen the programme so what do I know? 

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3 hours ago, Southern Discomfort said:

Autism is also or can be recognised as a disability here in the UK. By law a disorder is recognised individually as a disability if it impedes the person's quality of life in some manner, such as making it harder to complete every day tasks or people generally struggle to understand you. 

As someone who is autistic I can get fed up at the autistic community as well as the ones on the outside trying to understand the condition - or think they understand it. The reason I get fed up at the autistic community is because it seems to very easy to offend someone. You know, some people find the puzzle piece upsetting, some have problems with how you refer to an autistic person (is it 'person with autism' or 'autistic person'), blah. BLAH. But make no mistake I tire when people mistake it for an illness or that recovery is somehow possible especially when they think natural "alternatives" are useful. Fuck off with that shite.

I also get it that people want to normalise it as a different way of being, and in some cases it is. However, it does in a lot of cases impede a person's ability to live with other people so I think generally speaking it should be looked upon as a disability because if it doesn't then the seriousness of the condition isn't being recognised; there are a lot of people who need supported living who are still classed as "high functioning", if they decided to view it no longer as a disability then a lot of people could find themselves without the proper support because their needs will not be recognised any more.

As regards with the programme, I haven't watched it. If it does get a viewing over on this side of the pond - and not paying bloody Netflix's just inflated prices for it then I may well do it. I'd probably take it with a grain of salt in terms of how the character is portrayed, as one minority within the autistic minority. Whatever. To a degree it's good that autistic is getting normalised. What would be better if they consulted some autistic people for an accurate representation. But of course, I haven't seen the programme so what do I know? 

This is exactly why i thought autism was a disability, because it does impede a persons quality of life to some degree, and in canada most conditions that impede a persons daily life are considered disabilities. But i can understand that for alot of cases it isnt a disability at all, just a different level of being.

@Hopelessly Broken

12 hours ago, Hopelessly Broken said:

Because autism isn't an illness. As has been said.  

 

I have already cleared up that i made a mistake in calling autism an illness. All im saying is that autism is a case of differences from the norm (which in most cases is considered an illness if we were talking about literally any other condition).

 

12 hours ago, chem said:

Like Hopelessly Broken stated above-  autism is not a mental illness. Please stop categorising it as such. It is a difference in neurology. Meaning my brain is hardwired differently as an autistic person than the brain of a non-autistic person. 

 

 

Ok but can you see why i believe autism can be a problem for alot of people? Most mental illnesses are just that- a difference in hardwiring (childhood onset schizophrenia being one of them). Still, i am by no means calling autism a mental illness, just a difference so significant that it was given its own diagnosis.

Anyways my point here is that if you like doctor shows, the good doctor is a really nice show with a genius main character, not only because hes autistic, but because hes a different person than others. Much like house was in his show.

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Posted (edited)

7 hours ago, Southern Discomfort said:

Autism is also or can be recognised as a disability here in the UK. By law a disorder is recognised individually as a disability if it impedes the person's quality of life in some manner, such as making it harder to complete every day tasks or people generally struggle to understand you. 

As someone who is autistic I can get fed up at the autistic community as well as the ones on the outside trying to understand the condition - or think they understand it. The reason I get fed up at the autistic community is because it seems to very easy to offend someone. You know, some people find the puzzle piece upsetting, some have problems with how you refer to an autistic person (is it 'person with autism' or 'autistic person'), blah. BLAH.

But make no mistake I tire when people mistake it for an illness or that recovery is somehow possible especially when they think natural "alternatives" are useful. Fuck off with that shite.

I also get it that people want to normalise it as a different way of being, and in some cases it is. However, it does in a lot of cases impede a person's ability to live with other people so I think generally speaking it should be looked upon as a disability because if it doesn't then the seriousness of the condition isn't being recognised; there are a lot of people who need supported living who are still classed as "high functioning", if they decided to view it no longer as a disability then a lot of people could find themselves without the proper support because their needs will not be recognised any more.

As regards with the programme, I haven't watched it. If it does get a viewing over on this side of the pond - and not paying bloody Netflix's just inflated prices for it then I may well do it. I'd probably take it with a grain of salt in terms of how the character is portrayed, as one minority within the autistic minority. Whatever. To a degree it's good that autistic is getting normalised. What would be better if they consulted some autistic people for an accurate representation. But of course, I haven't seen the programme so what do I know? 

To be fair, it is in most countries. Also to be fair, it was a neurotypical who created the diagnosis, and it is neurotypical people who decide that it is disabling. It was also neurotypical people who moronically decided that Asperger's is invalid, which lead to how many of us no longer being able to be eligible for support services? Autism being classed as a disability did that, nothing else. 

Then there are many, many adults who suffered at the hands of ABA, myself included. This isn't some kind of bullshit patient bias either. I cannot describe the psychological damage that was done because of it, and it took me years to learn to treat myself as a human being and not be ashamed of my own identity. 

And ABA isn't the only intervention that creates problems. There are problems within the education system, the laws, and of course society as a whole. 

Parents of autistic children are gullible and easily fall for the bullshit that many doctors preach about autism and how it needs to be addressed. Until the child is old enough and able enough to contribute to decisions about their support services, parents should receive more informed information that goes over all options, and the least restrictive practices should be used. ABA is far from that, and so is forced antipsychotic meds, among other interventions that add segregation and stigma. 

Besides that my point is that it is part of our identity, therefore it should be up to us to define for our own self what is impeding on our lives, not laws or a neurotypical person. If we cannot make such decisions on our own, an advocate that has our best interests at heart should, always involving us in the process where fitted. 

Not being able to live with people? When the fuck is that disabling? When is people not understanding you a disability caused directly by autism? Ignorance is bliss until you are the victim of it. 

There are alternatives to supported accommodation. That shouldn't be the end all option unless the person chooses it to be. Being told I'm disabled because I don't have the same social requirements is yet another shitty aspect of being autistic. 

If it is a problem for the person, so be it. That doesn't mean it is for all of us.  

Before you ask, no, I'm not offended. Offended has nothing to do with it. Its merely a matter of it belongs to us, no one else should have the right to define it or what it does. Then it is about the portrayal of what being autistic is overall. Messages that portray us to be some kind of freakish problem are false. 

But my contribution is done. No use wasting words on ignorant people. 

 

Edited by Hopelessly Broken
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For those of you with no idea what ABA is:

https://www.verywell.com/aba-applied-behavioral-analysis-therapy-autism-259913

As more and more adults are diagnosed with autism as adults, the discussion about the appropriateness of childhood interventions is going to get hotter and hotter, because we can raise our voices much more effectively than children can. In my opinion, ABA is mainstreaming. Mainstreaming is a process that seeks to make an Autistic child indistinguishable from a neurotypical child. It makes the child “act normal.” Act. It teaches a child to lie, to impersonate, every single day of his or her life, to make him- or herself more appealing to the neurotypicals. It doesn’t change the way a child feels inside. All it does is alienate the kid from the actions that are true representations of a healthy self.

I’m not saying that teaching Autistic kids how to stand in line and use forks is a bad thing. I’m saying that teaching them that the only acceptable way to be in this world is just like everyone else is abuse. They have every right to their own gifts and weaknesses, just like anyone else. 

In America, Autism is a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act, because it is considered to have a significant impact on one’s daily functioning. I consider this correct. It’s neurological; so is epilepsy. It impacts my daily life, there’s no doubt about that. 

What we need is greater understanding and acceptance, not pseudo-“cures.”

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