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It’s legal here where I live but not everywhere. I’m not in klonopin anymore so I deal with anxiety all day everyday. 

 

Right now all it it does is take the anxiety away. I don’t believe it’s wrong but if it was illegal where I live then I would consider it bad for you. 

 

I don’t want anyone to follow in my footsteps. I just do what I have to to survive.

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It's legal where I live, but I've never tried it. I consider it an emergency med, for when when things are particularly bad.

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It’s a great relief for me. I weaned off klonopin and I’m almost two months off and I don’t feel any withdrawals. 

 

Just my normal morning anxiety. 

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Yes but when I’m off of it I just feel normal anxiety. I know I’m thru the benzo withdrawals. 

 

My suggestion to ppl who want to recover from benzo withdrawals is don’t engage about your symptoms. 

 

I fled the benzobuddie forum because it was just making me worse. 

 

Since i I banned myself I haven’t dealt with any symptoms.

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I would implore you to be very careful with kratom.

Here's a little bit of info on kratom.

From Wikipedia (I know, not the best source...)

Kratom (Mitragyna speciosa) is a tropical evergreen tree in the coffee family native to Southeast Asia. It has opioid properties and some stimulant-like effects.

As of 2018, little is known of kratom's worth or safety as a therapeutic agent, since research into its use has been of poor quality. In Feb. 2018, the FDA stated that there is no evidence kratom is safe or effective for treating any condition. Some people take it for managing chronic pain, for treating opioid withdrawal symptoms, or -- more recently -- for recreational purposes. Onset of effects typically begins within 5-10 minutes and lasts 2-5 hours.

Common minor side effects may include nausea, vomiting, and constipation. More severe side effects may include respiratory depression, seizure, addiction, and psychosis. Other side effects may include high heart rate and blood pressure, trouble sleeping, and, rarely, liver toxicity. When use is stopped, withdrawal symptoms may occur. Deaths have occurred with kratom both by itself and mixed with other substances. Between 2011 and 2017, 44 kratom-related deaths occurred, with one involving kratom alone. Nine kratom-related deaths occurred in Sweden in 2011 and 2012, all involving a mixture of kratom with other opioids.

As of 2018, there is growing international concern about a possible threat to public health from kratom use. In some jurisdictions, its sale and importation have been restricted, and several public health authorities have raised alerts. Kratam is a controlled substance in 16 countries, and in 2014, the FDA banned imports and manufacturing of kratom as a dietary supplement. Sometimes, the finished product is mixed into cocktails with other psychoactive drugs, such as caffeine and codeine.

Pharmacology

As of 2017, much of the pharmacology of kratom was not well understood, having stimulant effects at low doses, an opioid-like effect at higher doses, as well as sedative and sensory-seppressive effects.

Both mitragynine and 7-HMG are selective full agonists of the μ-opioid receptor; 7-HMG appears to have higher affinity. The stimulant effects appear to be mediated via prevention of activation of serotonin 5-HT2A receptors and postsynaptic α2A-adrenergic receptors. Rhynchophylline is a non-competitive NMDA antagonist found in kratom.

Mitragynine is metabolized in humans via phase I and phase II mechanisms with the resulting metabolites excreted in urine. In in vitro experiments, kratom extracts inhibited CYP3A4, CYP2D6, and CYP1A2 enzymes, which results in significant potential for drug interaction.

http://www.emcdda.europa.eu/publications/drug-profiles/kratom#pharmacology

Pharmacology

In general, the effects of kratom in humans are dose-dependent: small doses produce 'cocaine-like' stimulation while larger dosages cause 'morphine-like' sedative-narcotic effects.

After taking a few grams of dried leaves, the invigorating effects and euphoria are felt within 10 minutes and last for one to one and a half hours. Kratom users report increased work capacity, alertness, sociability, and sometimes heightened sexual desire. The pupils are usually normal or very slightly contracted; blushing may be noted. In one of the few human clinical experiments, a 50 mg oral dose of mitragynine produced motor excitement, followed by giddiness, loss of motor coordination (positive Romberg's test), and tremors of the extremities and face. For regular kratom users, loss of weight, tiredness, constipation, and hyperpigmentation of the cheek may be notable side effects. The pharmacological mechanisms responsible for stimulant activity is unclear.

[...]

Mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine, the two alkaloids mainly responsible for the effects of kratom, are selective and full agonists of the μ-subtype opoid receptor (MOR). The receptor agonist effect of kratom alkaloids is antagonised by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. In addition, 5-HT2A and postsynaptic α2-aderenergic receptors, as well as neuronal Ca(2+) channels are also involved in the unique pharmacological and behavioural activity of mitragynine.

In animal studies, the antinociceptive and cough-suppressant effects of mitragynine were comparable to those of codeine. In mice, 7-hydroxymitragynine was several times more potent analgesic than morphine even upon oral administration.

Kratom is slightly toxic to animals. Mice chronically treated with 7-hydroxymitragynine developed tolerance, cross-tolerance to morphine and withdrawal signs that could be precipitated by naloxone adminitration.

Regular kratom use may produce dependence. The withdrawal symptoms in humans are relatively mild and typically diminish within a week. Craving, weakness and lethargy, anxiety, restlessness, rhinorrhea, myalgia, nausea, sweating, muscle pain, jerky movements of the limbs, tremor as well as sleep disturbances and hallucinations may occur. Treatment, if needed, may include dihydrocodeine-lofexidine combination, non-steroidal antiinflammatory agents, antidepressants and/or anxiolytics.

[...]

The consumption of kratom concomitantly with other drugs can provoke serious side effects. In fact, adverse drug interactions involving kratom tea taken with carisoprodol, modafinil, propylhexedrine or Datura stramonium have been reported. A fatal case in the United States involved a blend of kratom, fentanyl, diphenhydramine, caffeine and morphine sold as a herbal drug.

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Kratom will bring you nothing but hell. I was addicted to oxycodone, heroin, and fentanyl for years. A friend of mine suggested to look into kratom to get off the opiates, but little did I know kratom is its own little unique opioid. I was addicted to kratom for the past year and a half. It certainly kept me away from street opiates, but I traded an illegal habit for a (temporarily) legal one. Kratom acts on mu-opioid receptors, plus some SNRI activity. I have recently been clean from kratom for a month, and the withdrawals were H E L L. Very similar to tramadol withdrawal. While you can, I suggest you stop taking kratom. It will make your anxiety much, much worse in the long run and you will end up with an expensive habit. Please hear me out, KRATOM IS AN OPIOID. So many people overhype its "medicinal" properties. It works for pain, anxiety, and depression because it floods your opioid receptors. You are trading using benzos (which are vastly demonized) for an opioid. Escape while you can.

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7 hours ago, icygrave said:

Kratom will bring you nothing but hell. I was addicted to oxycodone, heroin, and fentanyl for years. A friend of mine suggested to look into kratom to get off the opiates, but little did I know kratom is its own little unique opioid. I was addicted to kratom for the past year and a half. It certainly kept me away from street opiates, but I traded an illegal habit for a (temporarily) legal one. Kratom acts on mu-opioid receptors, plus some SNRI activity. I have recently been clean from kratom for a month, and the withdrawals were H E L L. Very similar to tramadol withdrawal. While you can, I suggest you stop taking kratom. It will make your anxiety much, much worse in the long run and you will end up with an expensive habit. Please hear me out, KRATOM IS AN OPIOID. So many people overhype its "medicinal" properties. It works for pain, anxiety, and depression because it floods your opioid receptors. You are trading using benzos (which are vastly demonized) for an opioid. Escape while you can.

^ This.

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