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    • stage 3 lockdown for my state https://www.broadsheet.com.au/melbourne/city-file/article/victoria-going-lockdown-midnight-tonight-heres-what-you-need-know?fbclid=IwAR31YHPnz5xw_E5fNFYB3aucukj9wTXEEP7VAe3E5o7tJ6QcJoybyeMn-Oc   $1600 fines for social closeness
    • This was pretty interesting too. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/29/opinion/covid-plague-samuel-pepys.html
    • Thank you, Saint. It’s good to remember that people have been through this before. Not really so long ago. Three of my grandparents were born in 1904, and one in 1905. They all lived through the First World War, the Great Depression, the Second World War, the upheavals of the 60’s and, in my maternal grandfather’s case, 9/11. Humans are amazing. We rebuild from rubble. We find new ways. We go on.
    • Some people just can’t tolerate a combo of 2 antidepressants, so it’s an alternative approach. I don’t think it should be a “last resort” necessarily, because some are FDA approved for the purpose... it’s not necessarily a “worse” side effect profile, but more like a different one that works better for some 
    • Today was day 14 of my self-imposed quarantine, in which I left the house exactly once for a commando raid to the grocery store, and three times to the mailbox. The remaining time I have been inside my house, alone with the cat. It has not been any more difficult than usual, because this is largely my life anyway. I have no one to be social with in this godforsaken backward cultural wasteland, and I don't human very well no matter where I go. Obviously, I don't have Covid-19. Sooooo, what does one do when one has finished one's quarantine virus-free? Apparently, start another one to stay that way. It really does kind of feel like the Zombie Apocalypse, because the very air outside feels full of menace, like something vile is lurking around the corner of the house and any minute is going to step out and gnaw on my elbow. Q: What do zombies eat on the Fourth of July? A: Braaiinnzzz... The thing is, even though I'm no more alone than I ever am, the fact that everyone has to be and is talking about how had it is sort of magnifies the pain of it for those of us who endure it 24/7/365. At least, it does for me. My 77-year-old mother called me today to see if I was doing all right. She called me from the car outside McDonald's where she and my 77-year-old dad had just gone to get something to eat.   I said, "I'm doing fine, I haven't left the house in a week. GO HOME." It just occurred to me that they could have called this disease gregariitis, because it disproportionately attacks the gregarious, those who can't stay away from each other. Imagine - if the projections of 100,000 American dead are correct, along with the toll across the world, that means the planet stands to lose a disproportionate number of its gregarious extroverts, in such numbers that it could possibly affect the genetic makeup of the species in the long term.   Someday, we'll look back on all this and laugh, and laugh, and laugh. Actually, no, we won't, will we?

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  2. stage 3 lockdown for my state https://www.broadsheet.com.au/melbourne/city-file/article/victoria-going-lockdown-midnight-tonight-heres-what-you-need-know?fbclid=IwAR31YHPnz5xw_E5fNFYB3aucukj9wTXEEP7VAe3E5o7tJ6QcJoybyeMn-Oc $1600 fines for social closeness
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  4. This was pretty interesting too. https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/29/opinion/covid-plague-samuel-pepys.html
  5. Thank you, Saint. It’s good to remember that people have been through this before. Not really so long ago. Three of my grandparents were born in 1904, and one in 1905. They all lived through the First World War, the Great Depression, the Second World War, the upheavals of the 60’s and, in my maternal grandfather’s case, 9/11. Humans are amazing. We rebuild from rubble. We find new ways. We go on.
  6. Some people just can’t tolerate a combo of 2 antidepressants, so it’s an alternative approach. I don’t think it should be a “last resort” necessarily, because some are FDA approved for the purpose... it’s not necessarily a “worse” side effect profile, but more like a different one that works better for some
  7. Today was day 14 of my self-imposed quarantine, in which I left the house exactly once for a commando raid to the grocery store, and three times to the mailbox. The remaining time I have been inside my house, alone with the cat. It has not been any more difficult than usual, because this is largely my life anyway. I have no one to be social with in this godforsaken backward cultural wasteland, and I don't human very well no matter where I go. Obviously, I don't have Covid-19. Sooooo, what does one do when one has finished one's quarantine virus-free? Apparently, start another one to stay that way. It really does kind of feel like the Zombie Apocalypse, because the very air outside feels full of menace, like something vile is lurking around the corner of the house and any minute is going to step out and gnaw on my elbow. Q: What do zombies eat on the Fourth of July? A: Braaiinnzzz... The thing is, even though I'm no more alone than I ever am, the fact that everyone has to be and is talking about how had it is sort of magnifies the pain of it for those of us who endure it 24/7/365. At least, it does for me. My 77-year-old mother called me today to see if I was doing all right. She called me from the car outside McDonald's where she and my 77-year-old dad had just gone to get something to eat. I said, "I'm doing fine, I haven't left the house in a week. GO HOME." It just occurred to me that they could have called this disease gregariitis, because it disproportionately attacks the gregarious, those who can't stay away from each other. Imagine - if the projections of 100,000 American dead are correct, along with the toll across the world, that means the planet stands to lose a disproportionate number of its gregarious extroverts, in such numbers that it could possibly affect the genetic makeup of the species in the long term. Someday, we'll look back on all this and laugh, and laugh, and laugh. Actually, no, we won't, will we?
  8. i'm by no means a doctor, so please excuse my layman's way of explaining this as i understand it. atypical antipsychotics are often used in low doses (usually well below the standard doses for treating psychosis) because they can amplify the effect of the antidepressant and make it more effective. or, when an antidepressant is partially helpful but there are still symptoms present, adding another medication to target the remaining symptoms can be faster than titrating off the AD, titrating on to a new one, and then waiting 6-8 weeks to judge if it's more effective than the last one. it's also worth mentioning that AAPs are considered to be safer and cause less serious side effects than the older typical antipsychotics. at the doses used for anxiety, depression, OCD, etc, most people do not encounter serious side effects. lots of pdocs seem to prefer to try augmenting an AD with an AAP before even trying older antidepressants, like tricyclics and MAOIs. though these older ADs can be very effective, they are troublesome in some ways that SSRIs and AAPs are generally not. tricyclics can be more dangerous to overdose on, and generally come with a more severe side effect profile. MAOIs require dietary adjustments. my experience when i was first prescribed an AAP was that i was seeing benefit from my AD (sertraline) but still had racing thoughts and intrusive thoughts. adding risperidone at a very low dose helped that. i eventually switched to venlafaxine as my AD, which was more calming for me than sertraline. in combination with the risperidone, my anxiety and intrusive thoughts were well controlled. later, when i came off risperidone, i found that the venlafaxine alone did not cover my symptoms effectively. i'm now trying a tricyclic antidepressant alone. i hope this helps some. like i said, this is my understanding of it based on reading here and my own experiences.
  9. Your anxiety, which seroquel was treating, came back when you took away its' treatment.
  10. Once prolactin drops things will return to normal size. If you are taking an AAP that raises prolactin, a small dose of Abilify will lower it. Abilify lowers prolactin.
  11. Antipsychotics tend to have antidepressant capability. Some hit serotonin receptors quite significantly, as in Abilify.
  12. If you're taking it PRN it is unlikely you will get tolerant to it. Tolerance is not a big issue with antipsychotics, you can't compare to benzos. However I have been on Klonopin for decades without hitting tolerance.
  13. See on this speaker, the light flashes on and off on its own! I didn't touch it! It just turns on and starts recording me!
  14. I have zyprexa zydis as a PRN and it's been really helping me during this time. I am worried that my body will just keep getting used to the (PRN) dose or any dose though, sort of like how some people can become accustomed to and stop feeling any helpful effects from a benzo med? Is there truth to this? What's the right thing to do here? I didn't take any PRN zyprexa today and I feel rotten with more voices and evil messages from the universe and agitation from that and anxiety too. To make matters worse I'm being recorded by the cameras in our kitchen Bluetooth speaker right now. Freaking weirds me out!!!!! I can't deal right now
  15. Yesterday
  16. "This short documentary tells the story the once-thriving town of Okak, an Inuit settlement on the northern Labrador coast. Moravian missionaries evangelized the coast and encouraged the growth of Inuit settlements, but it was also a Moravian ship that brought the deadly Spanish influenza during the world epidemic of 1919. The Inuit of the area were decimated, and Okak was abandoned. Through diaries, old photos and interviews with survivors, this film relates the story of the epidemic and examines the relations between natives and missionaries." -source This film is chilling. Native people were especially hard hit by the virus. The story of Okak is a pandemic at its most devastating.
  17. There is a growing trend for antidepressant + antipsychotic combos. One does regularly read that patients get prescribed an SSRI and in addition they get some atypical antipsychotic. What is the goal of prescribing an antipsychotic to a person with Depression, Panic, Anxiety or OCD? Shouldn't it be last resort?
  18. I kept a medical history blog for many years and I am going to start posting selections from it that have to do with epidemics and pandemics. I will also post these same posts in my blog. Here is today's selection: Doctor’s Letter from Camp Devens discussing Spanish Influenza in 1918 “These men start with what appears to be an attack of la grippe or influenza, and when brought to the hospital they very rapidly develop the most viscous type of pneumonia that has ever been seen. Two hours after admission they have the mahogany spots over the cheek bones, and a few hours later you can begin to see the cyanosis extending from their ears and spreading all over the face. It is only a matter of a few hours then until death comes, and it is simply a struggle for air until they suffocate. It is horrible. (…) It takes special trains to carry away the dead. For several days there were no coffins and the bodies piled up something fierce, we used to go down to the morgue (which is just back of my ward) and look at the boys laid out in long rows. It beats any sight they ever had in France after a battle. An extra long barracks has been vacated for the use of the morgue, and it would make any man sit up and take notice to walk down the long lines of dead soldiers all dressed up and laid out in double rows.” Full Letter below... —— Camp Devens, Mass. Surgical Ward No. 16 29 September 1918 My Dear Burt, It is more than likely that you would be interested in the news of this place, for there is a possibility that you will be assigned here for duty, so having a minute between rounds I will try to tell you a little about the situation here as I have seen it in the last week. As you know, I have not seen much pneumonia in the last few years in Detroit, so when I came here I was somewhat behind in the niceties of the Army way of intricate diagnosis. Also to make it good, I have had for the last week an exacerbation of my old “Ear Rot” as Artie Ogle calls it, and could not use a stethoscope at all, but had to get by on my ability to “spot” ‘em thru my general knowledge of pneumonias… Camp Devens is near Boston, and has about 50,000 men, or did have before this epidemic broke loose. It also has the base hospital for the Division of the Northeast. This epidemic started about four weeks ago, and has developed so rapidly that the camp is demoralized and all ordinary work is held up till it has passed. All assemblages of soldiers taboo. These men start with what appears to be an attack of la grippe or influenza, and when brought to the hospital they very rapidly develop the most viscous type of pneumonia that has ever been seen. Two hours after admission they have the mahogany spots over the cheek bones, and a few hours later you can begin to see the cyanosis extending from their ears and spreading all over the face. It is only a matter of a few hours then until death comes, and it is simply a struggle for air until they suffocate. It is horrible. One can stand it to see one, two or twenty men die, but to see these poor devils dropping like flies sort of gets on your nerves. We have been averaging about 100 deaths per day, and still keeping it up. There is no doubt in my mind that there is a new mixed infection here, but what I don’t know. My total time is taken up hunting rales, rales dry or moist, sibilant or crepitant or any other of the hundred things that one may find in the chest, they all mean but one thing here — pneumonia — and that means in about all cases death. The normal number of doctors here is about 25 and that has been increased to over 250, all of whom (of course excepting me) have temporary orders — “Return to your proper station on completion of work” — Mine says, “Permanent Duty,” but I have been in the Army just long enough to learn that it doesn’t always mean what it says. So I don’t know what will happen to me at the end of this. We have lost an outrageous number of nurses and doctors, and the little town of Ayer is a sight. It takes special trains to carry away the dead. For several days there were no coffins and the bodies piled up something fierce, we used to go down to the morgue (which is just back of my ward) and look at the boys laid out in long rows. It beats any sight they ever had in France after a battle. An extra long barracks has been vacated for the use of the morgue, and it would make any man sit up and take notice to walk down the long lines of dead soldiers all dressed up and laid out in double rows. We have no relief here; you get up in the morning at 5:30 and work steady till about 9:30 p.m., sleep, then go at it again. Some of the men of course have been here all the time, and they are tired. If this letter seems somewhat disconnected overlook it, for I have been called away from it a dozen times, the last time just now by the Officer of the Day, who came in to tell me that they have not as yet found at any of the autopsies any case beyond the red hepatitis stage. It kills them before it gets that far. I don’t wish you any hard luck Old Man, but do wish you were here for a while at least. It’s more comfortable when one has a friend about. The men here are all good fellows, but I get so damned sick o’ pneumonia that when I eat I want to find some fellow who will not “talk shop” but there ain’t none, no how. We eat it, sleep it, and dream it, to say nothing of breathing it 16 hours a day. I would be very grateful indeed it you would drop me a line or two once in a while, and I will promise you that if you ever get into a fix like this, I will do the same for you. Each man here gets a ward with about 150 beds (mine has 168), and has an Asst. Chief to boss him, and you can imagine what the paper work alone is — fierce — and the Government demands all paper work be kept up in good shape. I have only four day nurses and five night nurses (female) a ward-master, and four orderlies. So you can see that we are busy. I write this in piecemeal fashion. It may be a long time before I can get another letter to you, but will try. Good-by old Pal, ‘God be with you till we meet again’ Keep the Bouells open, Roy —– Content source: An episode of the PBS documentary series, American Experience, called “Influenza 1918″. Unfortunately the webpage that had additional content, including this letter, is currently down. I was lucky to have saved an archive of it. Image source: Boston Red Cross volunteers assemble masks at Camp Devens, MA.
  19. When I have time, I turn to YouTube. I discovered Pluto Living (a talking dog), and have watched a few very entertaining videos on what to do when you run out of TP—spray bottles, reusable rags, etc—plus other equally topics that appear to interest many. Of course, I’m still working, and still avoiding cleaning and cooking. Guess I’m good at doing mindless things.
  20. No offense taken, he's a bloody buffoon at best. As for the question, I am going to say probably never. Even when the virus is gone, I doubt it will be something that won't leave an ever lasting impact on the way we live and function socioeconomically. That probably sounds grim but that's my thought. And that's socioeconomically and both socially and economically separately. Even just basic human survival and functioning, for some I think the impact of prolonged isolation will change them forever, I know I have spent my whole life forcibly excluded from the rest of society and it definitely molded aspects of my social behaviour and ability to understand how it impacts people, even though I myself am not negatively impacted on a personal level.
  21. I'm homeschooling my kid, so I actually have less time! But I started coloring again the other day. I'm trying to keep up with knitting and crochet but honestly I'm so exhausted that when I do get some free time I just stare at my iPad.
  22. some tips from my friends who are working from home 1) set up your workspace in a room that you don't sleep or eat in such as a spare bedroom, if that's possible 1A) if you can't do step 1, make a space in your room dedicated to only work- your work tools only on a desk with some pens/ pencils/ etc 2) wear clothes that you would normally wear when you're at your normal office 3) use productivity things like the Do Not Disturb function on your phone. my particular phone even has a "Focus Mode" that limits access to apps like facebook and your web browser 4) expect the first week or 2 of working from home to be chaotic and possibly less productive. 5) hang in there. yall are doing your best in a very difficult situation!
  23. a lot of the USSD martial arts schools are running virtual karate lessons for all ages and levels (INCLUDING people who have never tried martial arts before). I unfortunately had to suspend my membership because of some other life stuff, but if taking up martial arts is something you've wanted to try, you might be able to trial a few classes from the comfort of your living room. NOTE: I'm pretty sure there are other karate schools that are offering online classes, but I'm not affiliated with them and can only really speak to the quality of instruction I've received from USSD. NOT sponsored, not paid to promote this. just thought it might be something cool for folx to try if they were looking for a way to exercise
  24. it's very weird to me. I hate most physical contact, and now I'm kind of craving it. I'm classed as "essential personnel with manufacturing responsibilities" at my work (I work for a biomedical company that manufactures diagnostic laboratory reagents for clinical chemistry applications, including COVID-19 testing kits), which means I'm required to be at work as much as possible during a typical operations week. we're coping as best we can with the restrictions. physical distancing is pretty easy, unless you're packaging kits or trying to learn things from other people. 90% of communication is now done via text, phone call, or email vs face to face contact. we can submit documents via scanning and attachments to emails. meetings are held via WebEx, Zoom, and Skype for business. there's been a lot of frustration this week as we're switching manufacturing gears away from our usual assays (HCY, hsCRP, d-Dimer, electrolyte assays, and more) to COVID-19 test kits my mom is on mandatory work from home orders due to her health conditions. somewhere between 80 and 95% of her division is on WFH orders. she said the first few days were really chaotic and super stressful, but as more and more people are getting used to being WFH, it's much less chaotic. In personal life, it's been both a relief to be physically distancing and a curse. curse cos I can't hang out with my datefriend at all, since they don't live within at 20 minute drive. curse cos I can't attend karate classes, so I'm having to make do with training in my room and garage (it's not going as well as planned... I poked a hole in my wall with a pair of sais!) curse cos I can't carpool with friends to play Pokemon. blessing cos all the people I hang out with are finding creative ways to hang out while not being around each other. group chats, going on walks while maintaining 6' of distance between each other, and phone calls. my commute takes less time now cos fewer people are out and about.
  25. Didn't a guy die from taking chloroquine after Trump said it's completely safe and the FDA had approved it for coronavirus? (the FDA had not.) I think the guy may have been healthy. This is something my hubby told me after reading about it online so I can't say for sure.
  26. I've been doing a few things: Try to make the space I work in as functional and pleasant as possible Try to create a new structure/routine for working from home to replace the one I had with going to the office Pay attention to continuing the strategies that help at the office. For me these include background music, talking through ideas with coworkers, breaking tasks into small chunks, etc Allow myself to be a bit less productive. These are stressful times
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