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Wow, thank you Woo! You rock! I'm going to try it (though maybe not 100 servings.  :P )

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My google-fu appears strong this morning. :)

 

Don't forget to use your number 16 scoop! 

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Kung pao chicken

1 pound boneless chicken breast or thighs, cut into 1/2-inch cubes

2 Tbsp Cornstarch

1/4 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp sugar

2 Tbsp water

1 Tbsp black (dark) soy sauce

1 Tbsp Shaoxing rice wine, dry sherry, or sake

1 egg white (I often omit)

Mix above and set aside to marinate for two hours or more.

Oil for deep frying

1/2 cup raw peanuts

Put 2" oil in a wok.* Heat to 350°. Deep fry peanuts until golden brown. Remove and drain on paper towels. Lower heat to 275°-300°. Add the chicken pieces and stir to separate. Blanch in the oil until they turn white. remove and drain on paper towels. Work in batches if necessary. I usually line a sieve with paper towels and let drain over a bowl.

Remove all but 2 Tbsp oil from the wok

4 dried chili peppers, torn into small pieces. Do not discard seeds

4-8 Extra whole chili peppers

3 Tbsp finely minced ginger

3 Tbsp finely minced garlic

4 scallions, cut into pea-sized pieces, including some green part

1 can whole water chestnuts, quartered

2-3 ribs celery, chopped into pieces the size of the quarters water chestnuts

Additional veggies if desired, chopped. Zucchini, red bell pepper, carrot, and onion are good choices.

Slightly brown all the chili peppers in the oil. Add the ginger, garlic, and scallions. Stir-Fry until garlic is golden. Add the veggies and stir-fry until mostly done.

Sauce:

1/4 tsp salt

4 tsp sugar

1 tsp cornstarch

3 Tbsp black (dark) soy sauce

4 Tbsp shaoxing rice wine, dry sherry, or sake

2 Tbsp Chinese red vinegar or cider vinegar

1 Tbsp sesame oil

2 Tbsp Hoisin sauce

2 Tbsp low-sodium chicken stock

1 tsp oyster sauce

Mix the sauce ingredients and pour into wok. Stir-fry until sauce is thickened. Add in the chicken and stir-fry briefly until done. Add peanuts. Mix well and put on a serving platter.

*If you don't want to do the oil blanching, first mix chicken pieces in 2 tsp baking soda and let set for 10-30 minutes. Rinse chicken pieces in water and dry. Add chicken pieces to marinade mixture and set aside. Add 2 tablespoons of oil to the wok and add the peanuts along with the chili peppers. Add the chicken after the ginger, garlic, and scallions, then add the veggies. When almost done, add the sauce mixture and stir-fry until thickened.

Adapted from The New Classic Chinese Cookbook by Mai Leungpost-35938-0-51065200-1432415293_thumb.j

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This makes a nice alternative to potatoes.

Honey-glazed turnips

1-1/2 pounds baby turnips

4 Tbsp unsalted butter

2 heaping Tbsp honey

2 Tbsp toasted sliced almonds

Salt and pepper

1-1/2 Tbsp chopped cilantro

Cooked the turnips in boiling salted water for 10 minutes, or until tender but still firm to the bite. Drain.

Melt the butter with the honey in a frying pan. Add the turnips and cook, stirring for 3-5 minutes or until glossy.

Stir in the almonds, then pile the turnips onto a warmed serving dish. Season with salt and pepper. Pour over the pan juices and sprinkle with the cilantro.

From The Moroccan Collection by Hilare Walden

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I found a very cool Cambodian cooking website A while back.  It has tons of interesting recipes.  I made this one for lunch today, and it was very satisfying. I used two serrano peppers and one jalapeño pepper, because that's what I had. It was enough heat to be satisfying, I think, but I will prolly go hotter next time.  Flash likes his spicy!  You can see my pics at the bottom.

--------------------------------------

Pakon kho matek (Caramelized shrimp with chili pepper)

chilishrimp.jpg

This delicious hot and spicy caramelized shrimp is authentic Khmer Krom country food.

Ingredients :

1 Tablespoon water

1 Tablespoon sugar

½ Cup water

2 Tablespoons fish sauce

1 Tablespoon sugar

¼ Teaspoon salt

2 Tablespoons vegetable oil

4 Cloves garlic, minced

1 lb Shrimp. Peeled and de-veins.

6 Chopped fresh chili pepper or to your taste(option)

3 Stalk green onion, chopped ½ inch in length

¼ Teaspoon black pepper

Procedures :

First make caramelized sauce by put 1 tablespoon of water and 1 tablespoon of sugar in a small sauce pan. Cook and stir frequently till sugar turns dark brown color, immediately pour ½ cup water over caramelized sauce, stirs well.

Add fish sauce, sugar and salt, stirs well, removed from heat and set a side.

Heat up a skillet or wok with high temperature.

When skillet is hot, add oil, garlic and shrimp, stirs well.

Seasoning with prepared caramelized sauce and chili pepper, stirs till shrimp turns darker pink color.

Add green onion and black pepper, stirs well.

Serve hot with rice.

http://www.khmerkromrecipes.com

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cambodianshrimp1_zps4149749c.jpg

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This was Flash's breakfast today: Shrimp, etc. stuffed into a bell pepper. It was yummy.  I'm a little weird and I'll eat dinner stuff for breakfast. Anyway, it hit the spot and was a nice Amount of food.  I overcooked the bell pepper a bit. Oops. I did maybe 25% onion/celery, 25% fresh chopped bread crumbs, and 50% chopped shrimp to start.  Ended up with a little more Shrimp and I tossed an extra handful of bread crumbs in, too.  So whatever that comes out to. Was pretty good proportion.  Maybe tad too much bread.

Green bell pepper, cut in half and seeded (make sure each half stands up)

Chopped Onions and celery softened in butter, with a few pinches of herbes de Provence and salt and pepper

Chopped cooked tiny Shrimp (1/4 pound)

Chopped Italian parsley

Sea salt

Black pepper

Herbs de Provence

Chopped up garlic bread (because I accidentally bought that Instead of regular French bread)

Panko, browned in butter with herbed de Provence, salt, pepper, and parsley to top

(Just stick it In the same saucepan you used to soften celery and onions and spoon on top toward end)

Bake in oven at 350 for 30-60 minutes.  I put it in a Pyrex dish with 1/2 cup water and lid for the first thirty minutes.  Then I took off lid and added the Panko topping to finish.  I Should have stopped at 40-45 minutes, prolly, but went to 55, hence the overlooked bell pepper.  Oops. Double Oops: I totally forgot to put the oyster mushrooms in. Now I don't know what I'll do with them. Note that my oven runs cool, so it probably won't take as long if yours is accurate.

image_zpsacc00e37.jpg

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Flash, thank you! You inspired me to make an Asian salad thingy tonight.

Also, the recipe for the turnips I will try. I love turnips.

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I did finally find a recipe for a southwestern veggie dip that's similar to the one I used to be able to get at the grocery store. It's a clone of a taco bell sauce, of all things, that was Tweaked to make it better. It uses mayo and sour cream as the base, but I'm thinking of trying greek yogurt next time.

http://www.kayotic.nl/blog/tag/taco-bell-baja-sauce

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Bought the turnips (about 0.350 gr). But I always buy too much food...

So I'm not trying your recipe for now Flash.

 

I really need to get rid of the koriander, some potatoes, apples and oranges (for juice) and a lemon. Anyone an idea?

 

I think about frying the turnips with some oil and then add some apple slices...? Is that good?

Or turnip soup with potato, onions, garlic and koriander?

 

I only had turnips twice before and then I made soup... something new would be nice.

Edited by Sawi

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Holy moly, how did I miss this thread before? 

 

Flash, you're a rockstar. 

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Thanks so much Flash! I already made soup with it (olive oil, turnips, potato, onions, stock, garlic). But I love turnips and whenever I see them I buy them.

I love the recipes with apple! I still got like 8 apples so I will try one of these soon!

 

Especially the turnip/potato/apple mash sounds amazing. Would be nice with some baked salmon...

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Sounds nice, Sawi! Let us know how the apple dish goes.

Below is a recipe for an Indian mung bean soup. There are many variations, but I chose the simplest one to share here because it doesn't have a bunch of spices that you may not have on hand. This is a more delicate soup, quite unlike the spicy sambar. Serve it with bread or rice and a vegetable. To complete the meal serve yogurt or a green salad. The cookbook is worth having if you like Indian food, and there is a paperback "best of" version, too.

Simple Mung Dal Soup

2/3 cup split mung dal, without skins (split mung beans)

6-1/2 cups water

1 tsp turmeric

2 tsp ground coriander

1-1/2 tsp scraped, finely shredded, or minced ginger root

1 tsp minced, seeded hot green chili (or as desired)

1-1/4 tsp salt

2 Tbsp ghee or vegetable oil

1 tsp cumin seeds

2 Tbsp coarsely chopped fresh coriander or minced fresh parsley

Sort, wash, and drain the split mung beans.

Combine the mung beans, water, turmeric, coriander, ginger root, and green chili in a 3-quart saucepan. Stirring occasionally, bring to a full boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to moderately low, cover with a tight-fitting lid, and boil gently for 1 hour or until the dal is soft and fully cooked.

Off the heat, uncover, add the salt, and beat with a wire whisk or rotary beater until the dal soup is creamy smooth.

Heat the ghee or oil in a small saucepan over moderate to moderately-high heat. When it is hot, toss in the cumin seeds. Fry until the seeds turn brown. Pour into the dal soup, immediately cover, and allow the seasonings to soak into the hot dal for 1-2 minutes. Add the minced herb, stir, and serve.

From Lord Krishna's Cuisine — The Art of Indian Vegetarian Cooking

By Yamuna Devi

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These are yummy enchiladas. Sometimes I'm lazy and make enchilada "lasagna" by just layering tortillas flat in the baking dish. Put sauce on the bottom, then a layer of tortillas, then the chicken filling, then another layer of the tortillas, then the sauce and finally the cheese. Or you can make it in a smaller baking dish and add an extra layer of tortillas and filling. You skip the quick-fry in oil step, and it's faster and less messy. There is a version of this that uses roasted Anaheim peppers for the green sauce that is equally yummy. I think this is it: http://www.food.com/recipe/el-charro-cafe-green-enchilada-sauce-55478

Chicken-filled enchiladas with tangy tomatillo sauce

(Enchiladas Verdes)

About 2-3/4 cups (1 recipe) quick-cooked tomatillo sauce (see below)

2-3 whole chicken breasts (2 pounds), cooked, skinned, boned, and shredded

1/4 cup crema or sour cream

1 Tbsp finely chopped white onion

Salt, about 1/4 tsp

12 corn tortillas, preferably store-bought

1/4 cup vegetable oil, plus a little more if needed

1/3 cup (about 1-1/2 oz.) Mexican queso añejo or other cheese

2 slices white onion, broken into rings, for garnish

Several radish slices or radish roses, for garnish

Heat the tomatillo sauce in a small, covered pan over low heat. Warm up the chicken in a separate pan over low heat (sprinkled with a little water so it won't dry out), then stir in the crema or sour cream, onion, and salt. Set aside off the fire, covered.

If the tortillas are moist, let them dry out out for a few minutes in a single layer. Heat the oil in a small skillet over medium-high. When sizzlingly hot, quick-fry the tortillas to soften them, one at a time, for 2 to 3 seconds on each side. Drain on paper towels.

Preheat the oven to 350. Pour a cup of the warm sauce onto a plate. Lay a tortilla in the sauce, flip it over, lay a scant 2 Tbsp of the filling across the center and roll it up. Transfer to a baking dish, then continue filling and rolling the rest of the tortillas. Pour the remaining sauce over the enchiladas, being careful to cover the ends.

Immediately cover the dish with foil and bake just long enough to heat through, about 10 minutes. Sprinkle the enchiladas with the crumbled cheese, decorate with onion rings and radishes, and serve right away.

Quick-cooked tomatillo sauce

(Salsa Verde)

1 pound (11 medium) fresh tomatillos, husked and washed

OR

Two 13-ounce cans tomatillos, drained

Fresh hot green chilis, roughly 3 serranos or 2 jalapeños

5-6 sprigs fresh cilantro, roughly chopped

1 small white onion, chopped

1 large Clove garlic, peeled and roughly chopped

1 Tbsp lard or vegetable oil

2 cups chicken broth

Salt, about 1/2 tsp (depending on saltiness of the broth)

Boil the fresh tomatillos and chilis in salted water to cover until tender, 10-15 minutes; drain. Simply drain canned tomatillos.

Place the tomatillos and chilis (raw chilis if using canned tomatillos) in a blender or food processor, along with the cilantro, onion, and garlic; if using a blender, stir well. Process until smooth, but still retaining a little texture.

Heat the lard or oil in a medium-large skillet over medium-high heat. When hot enough to make a drop of the purée sizzle sharply, pour the purée in all at once and stir constantly for 4-5 minutes, until darker and thicker. Add the broth, let return to a boil, reduce the heat to medium and simmer until thick enough to thick enough to coat a spoon, about 10 minutes. Season with salt

From Authentic Mexican — Regional Cooking from the Heart of Mexico

By Rick Bayless and Deann Groen Bayless

Edited by Flash

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Oh flash, you've done it again. I grew up in south Texas, I think my first solid food was salsa. If I can ever get sleep and energy, I'll make these, it sounds really good.

I use the Texas red enchilada sauce on the food.com website, it's simple and tastes like what I used to eat. (sorry, I'd post the link but my iPad keeps crashing)

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I think you'd also like this one, Rabbit. You can use chicken instead of pork, if you like. I usually make tacos the first day or two then make enchiladas with the leftover filling. I often like to fry corn tortillas in oil, because I like the crunch, but you could just warm them, of course. I serve with avocado, jalapeño, onion, tomatoes, cilantro or pico de gallo, lettuce, cotija cheese, and hot sauce.

Pork tinga filling for tacos or enchiladas

1-1/2 pounds lean, boneless pork shoulder, trimmed, and cut into 1-1/2" cubes

1/2 tsp mixed dried herbs (such as marjoram and thyme)

3 bay leaves

1-1/2 pounds ripe tomatoes, roasted or boiled, peeled, and cored

OR

One 28-ounce can tomatoes, drained

2 Tbsp vegetable oil

1 medium onion, chopped

1 red bell pepper, seeded and chopped (optional)

1 garlic clove, peeled and minced

1/2 tsp dried oregano.

2 canned chipotle chilis in adobo, seeded and thinly sliced

4 tsp of the adobo sauce from the can of chilis

Salt, about 1/2 tsp

Sugar, about 1/2 tsp

Bring about one quart of salted water to a boil in a medium sized saucepan, add the pork, skim the grayish foam that rises to the top during the first few minutes of simmering, then add the herbs and bay leaves. Partially cover and simmer over medium heat until the meat is tender, about an hour. If there is time, let the meat cool in the broth. Remove the meat, then drain the broth and spoon off all the fat that rises to the top; reserve 1 cup of the broth. When the meat is cool enough to handle, dry it on paper towels and shred.

Seed the tomatoes, if you wish, then chop into 1/2" pieces.

Heat the oil in a heavy skillet over medium heat. Add the meat, the onion, and the bell pepper, if using. Fry, stirring frequently, until browned, about 10 minutes. Stir in the garlic and cook 2 minutes. Add the chopped tomatoes and oregano, mix well, and simmer 5 minutes. Stir in the reserved cup of broth, chipotle peppers, and adobo sauce. Simmer gently for 10 minutes, then season with the salt and sugar.

From Authentic Mexican — Regional Cooking from the Heart of Mexico

By Rick Bayless and Deann Groen Bayless

Edited by Flash

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Thank you, flash, I'll try it! Sounds very good, and oh yeah, chipotles!

When I was in San Antonio in February, I stocked up on dried chipotles. And I recently found some very good corn tortillas, not in the typical mexican section (like chi chi's or Monterrey) but in the Goya section. Very soft, and they puff up beautifully when fried.

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I'll have to see if I can find some tortillas like that tortillas here.

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