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New hints for swallowing sticky horse pills


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I've developed a rather good method for gulping those oversized pills that tend to stick to the tongue and emit terrible bitterness.  For me, these include Lamictal and trazodone.

So, the method:

1.  Place pill on tongue.

2.  Quickly, grab your glass of beverage (a sweet, uncarbonated beverage is ideal, but water is fine, too).

3.  Take a mouthful of beverage (do not swallow it yet!).

4.  Swish it around vigorously in your mouth (like you would with mouthwash) to unseat the pill from your tongue and suspend it away from any of your mouth structures.

5.  Once it's suspended, swallow hard.

Please do not misinterpret step 5. ;-)

I'm going to go outside and get my mind out of the gutter... BRB

Okay, back.

Note that this technique has worked for me every time!

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My Lamictal pills aren't oversized so I don't really know.

But I've found, what works for me is, first take a big sip of water, then put the pill into your mouth. That way you don't even have to put it on your toungue so no disgusting chemical taste.

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I do that, I try to keep it away from my tounge, but I can NEVER swallow it fast enough to keep that nasty taste away.

Soda is the easiest way for me, I guess because I can chug that stuff down pretty quickly ;)

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  • 3 weeks later...

Anything with fat in it works for me.  2% milk, yogurt, chocolate pudding.  Swish the fat containing substance in the mouth first, then put the pill between the front teeth, then wash the pill down with milk or water.  In my case, putting it on the tongue first is a sure way to get the bitterness all down the back of my mouth.

I've tried with juice and sweet drinks but it doesn't seem to work as well for me, though it's much, much better than water alone.

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Here's something interesting.  I was just complaining to the pdoc that I tend to eat late, so ambien (which is absorbed & metabolized more slowly when you take it with food) can leave me feeling dopey in the morning.  He reminded me that it's possible to let it dissolve under the tongue.  "Ewww!" I said, and told him I'd tried it and that it was so bitter it was impossible to keep it in my mouth.  He looked astonished, and I told him at least it's not as bitter as lamictal.  Then he looked at me like I was really crazy.

Turns out that many, if not most, people can't taste either lamictal or ambien.  He reminded me of genetic studies that show variations between individuals in how things taste and whether things taste like anything at all, and he theorizes this is one of those situations.  I seem to remember that a lot of taste is inherited (and we're not talking about anyone's plaid pants).  Apparently lots of his patients can just let lamictal tablets dissolve in their mouths.  <<shudder>>

This would explain why 1) not many people are jumping on this thread, despite how passionate herrfous and I are in our complaints; 2) why lamictal tablets are uncoated; and 3) maybe why herrfous can block the nasty taste of his Vitamin L with juice when I need milk to take mine.

Thought I would share and contribute what I can to the pursuit of knowledge.

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Someone on another thread (can't remember where) said they let the tablet dissolve in their mouth and don't taste anything bad.  If I ever find the studies about genetic relationship to taste reception I'll post it.  But I'm trying not to spend hours on the 'puter at night, so I'm not sure I'll ever get to it.

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For me Lamictal is bitter as can be. Ambien I've never tasted because it is coated and goes down easy.  I'm going to try the under-tongue technique, it would be nice to have it act more rapidly.

It is well known that taste among humans is variable. I haven't seen anything on heritability, though I haven't looked.

Bitter is the taste that has been most noted.  That is why some people love certain green vegetables like broccoli, brussel sprouts, etc. and others gag on them.  It is also common for bitter taste to change from childhood to adulthood. Perhaps you may have experienced hating peas or lima beans as a child and then discovering them tasty as an adolescent or adult.

A survival advantage has been posited for varied human taste preferences.  That is that it allowed us to find different food sources to meet changing climatic conditions which changed available vegetation, and also as we roamed and expanded our geographic range.

Bon apettite

a.m.

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