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Please help --- This is a serious question


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I just broke the bank to buy an Xbox Series S console and a DELL 2721DGF gaming monitor.

Basically I played some time yesterday now I want to stop doing everything else and focus on just this thing. Of course I cannot as I have a very demanding job.

I have also put out an ad to sell this.

But I am in two minds. Should I keep it or sell it. I saw a webmd article saying gaming is good for people with mental illness https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/mental-health-benefits-of-video-games#:~:text=Video games can also help,good for virtual social interaction.

But I don't know for sure.

It is far too absorbing. Like I feel disconnected from everything else if I play.

Should I keep it or should I get rid of it.

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9 hours ago, the maze runner said:

Should I keep it or should I get rid of it.

This is just my opinion, but if the gaming absorbs you to the point of not wanting to do anything else, I would suggest you sell it.

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It strikes me that it may be too early to make this decision. It's not unusual, especially if your mind has been starved for some kind of alternative stimulation (or any stimulation), escape from current stressors, or some means of breaking out of relentless thought patterns, to latch firmly onto something that offers novelty. It's no different than being very hungry and finding the next thing you get to eat so good that you don't want to stop eating it.

But eventually the novelty becomes normal, and the urge to pursue it becomes less. Ultimately, if frequently encountered, the new becomes mundane, even boring, and we may turn away from it altogether.

A personal example: Just last week I decided to give the online game Star Trek Fleet Command a try. I already play Star Trek Online on a regular basis, but it's losing its excitement for me, so I thought I'd try something new. For two days I did little else but play Fleet Command, which, to be fair, is extremely easy to do because the game is designed as a total time-sponge. It's the sort of thing that a person could lose serious time in. Yet after only a couple of days I realized that the game wasn't going to challenge me in the way that I needed, wasn't going to give me a sense of social connection in the way that I wanted (too much toxic player-vs-player) and that it wasn't something I needed in my life. I deleted it from my machine and went back to my usual game.

Remember an important rule that applies across most areas of life: Moderation In All Things.

It's okay to indulge yourself in your Xbox, especially if it helps you to cope with things that are otherwise difficult for you to cope with. Indeed, the fact that you feel strongly drawn to it may be a clue for you that something else in your life is out of balance and needs to be brought back into balance. A certain amount of escape into your Xbox may be healthy. You don't say what it is you're playing; I also have (I'm seriously dating myself here) a Wii (yes, a Wii) that I use for basically nothing but the swordplay/fencing simulation games on the Wii Sports Resort. It's essentially the only way I get any exercise because trying to find anyone to actually fence with in central Kentucky is like trying to find a wild giraffe in the Arctic. But I digress.

The key is being able to set reliable controls over yourself to limit excess use. If you set a timer when you start to play, would you be able to stop when it goes off? Or is the compulsion severe enough that you call in sick to work in order to play? Or have you not had it long enough to know, and are just concerned because you realize how consuming it could be?

It sounds like you have some factors to consider before you take the extreme measure of disposing of something that actually gives you a measure of happiness. You are entitled to that, you know.

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Cerberus said:

It strikes me that it may be too early to make this decision. It's not unusual, especially if your mind has been starved for some kind of alternative stimulation (or any stimulation), escape from current stressors, or some means of breaking out of relentless thought patterns, to latch firmly onto something that offers novelty. It's no different than being very hungry and finding the next thing you get to eat so good that you don't want to stop eating it.

But eventually the novelty becomes normal, and the urge to pursue it becomes less. Ultimately, if frequently encountered, the new becomes mundane, even boring, and we may turn away from it altogether.

A personal example: Just last week I decided to give the online game Star Trek Fleet Command a try. I already play Star Trek Online on a regular basis, but it's losing its excitement for me, so I thought I'd try something new. For two days I did little else but play Fleet Command, which, to be fair, is extremely easy to do because the game is designed as a total time-sponge. It's the sort of thing that a person could lose serious time in. Yet after only a couple of days I realized that the game wasn't going to challenge me in the way that I needed, wasn't going to give me a sense of social connection in the way that I wanted (too much toxic player-vs-player) and that it wasn't something I needed in my life. I deleted it from my machine and went back to my usual game.

Remember an important rule that applies across most areas of life: Moderation In All Things.

It's okay to indulge yourself in your Xbox, especially if it helps you to cope with things that are otherwise difficult for you to cope with. Indeed, the fact that you feel strongly drawn to it may be a clue for you that something else in your life is out of balance and needs to be brought back into balance. A certain amount of escape into your Xbox may be healthy. You don't say what it is you're playing; I also have (I'm seriously dating myself here) a Wii (yes, a Wii) that I use for basically nothing but the swordplay/fencing simulation games on the Wii Sports Resort. It's essentially the only way I get any exercise because trying to find anyone to actually fence with in central Kentucky is like trying to find a wild giraffe in the Arctic. But I digress.

The key is being able to set reliable controls over yourself to limit excess use. If you set a timer when you start to play, would you be able to stop when it goes off? Or is the compulsion sever enough that you call in sick to work in order to play? Or have you not had it long enough to know, and are just concerned because you realize how consuming it could be?

It sounds like you have some factors to consider before you take the extreme measure of disposing of something that actually gives you a measure of happiness. You are entitled to that, you know.

Ok yes. I also think that the novelty will fade away. Right now only playing Doom Eternal. Also trying to establish limits on usage of the Xbox. Cannot afford to let it become a time warp and eat into time which would be better spent doing other more healthy things. Long time ago I used to play Doom and Quake on PC I still have memories of that. The other thing is that I have a mind which is already very stimulated so anythng that stimulates it further quickly becomes too much to handle. I think I will keep the Xbox. Perhaps keep it and not play it in the same way that certain cigarette smokers buy their last pack and keep it in their desk and consciously don't go for it. Yes I think if you let it then the Xbox can become your life and that's certainly something that I wouldn't want.

Edited by the maze runner
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Another thought: Doom Eternal is pretty high-octane. As a test, you might try finding a game that's a little more low-key and seeing if playing it leaves you with the same concern about being able to stop. Playing a game that drives your adrenaline definitely has a tendency to self-promote, but if you're wanting to use the Xbox as a means to casually recreate, you might investigate something that doesn't amp it up quite so much and see if you feel a little more mellow about it. Maybe steer away from the first-person shooter genre and try something that includes some puzzle solving, if that fits your taste. That can stimulate your mind in a whole other way.

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