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what nutrition if any does anyone try?


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Bach Flower Remedies seem to be helping me...along with therapy and meds.....

Bach flowers have been good, have used kinesiology - very powerful, best if used gently, noni juice reacted with clozaril, goji juice currently is good - very gentle but stabilizing, qi gong is very grounding & helps get me back into my body after a relapse.

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I've got a lot of help from various nutritional stuff, also tai-chi & qi gong - any other suggestions for support other than meds?

Getting the right amount of sleep, aerobic exercise, and a diet that meets your needs covers a whole lot

of ground and can mean the difference between your meds kind of working vs. being stable. So it's good

that you've been looking at nutrition and exercise already.

Periodically taking a day to just NOT handle the demands placed on you or to tend to ONLY your OWN

priorities is way underrated.

Therapy is highly recommended - to help you deal with the fallout from the psych problems and/or coach

you in interacting usefully once the brain cooties have been calmed down a bit. (i.e., I don't think that

yakking about momma at $200/hr is going to do squat for bipolar disorder. Popping a pill isn't going to

cut it for healing psychological trauma or for remediating poor social skills.)

As far as other stuff - it depends on what ails you and what you take for it. Orange juice is great stuff.

It's just not the right thing to wash Adderall down with. St. John's Wort can be a useful antidepressant -

in a way that makes it a bad idea for folks with bipolar and some atypical depressives, and really bad

news for someone on an MAOI.

Personally, I'm becoming convinced that the flourescent lighting in my office is NOT helping matters.

I'm dragging in a desk lamp to see if more/broader spectrum light does help. So maybe doing some

"life organizing" (Jemini might call it "mindfulness") to identify and remove the crap that ain't helping

matters is in order.

* I've said this before - as olfactory cues are known to be closely tied to memories and current moods,

I think there is a place for aromatherapy as an adjunct. As long as you aren't allergic, spending too

much money, or ditching your meds, they can't hurt. For things like SI and PTSD where there may be

specific memory/behavior triggers they might tbe very useful.

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I've got a lot of help from various nutritional stuff, also tai-chi & qi gong - any other suggestions for support other than meds?

Getting the right amount of sleep, aerobic exercise, and a diet that meets your needs covers a whole lot

of ground and can mean the difference between your meds kind of working vs. being stable. So it's good

that you've been looking at nutrition and exercise already.

Periodically taking a day to just NOT handle the demands placed on you or to tend to ONLY your OWN

priorities is way underrated.

Therapy is highly recommended - to help you deal with the fallout from the psych problems and/or coach

you in interacting usefully once the brain cooties have been calmed down a bit. (i.e., I don't think that

yakking about momma at $200/hr is going to do squat for bipolar disorder. Popping a pill isn't going to

cut it for healing psychological trauma or for remediating poor social skills.)

As far as other stuff - it depends on what ails you and what you take for it. Orange juice is great stuff.

It's just not the right thing to wash Adderall down with. St. John's Wort can be a useful antidepressant -

in a way that makes it a bad idea for folks with bipolar and some atypical depressives, and really bad

news for someone on an MAOI.

Personally, I'm becoming convinced that the flourescent lighting in my office is NOT helping matters.

I'm dragging in a desk lamp to see if more/broader spectrum light does help. So maybe doing some

"life organizing" (Jemini might call it "mindfulness") to identify and remove the crap that ain't helping

matters is in order.

* I've said this before - as olfactory cues are known to be closely tied to memories and current moods,

I think there is a place for aromatherapy as an adjunct. As long as you aren't allergic, spending too

much money, or ditching your meds, they can't hurt. For things like SI and PTSD where there may be

specific memory/behavior triggers they might tbe very useful.

Agree with comments re St John's Wort - not good with clozaril, probably also not good with solian. I was really light sensitive in my last episode, hated fluoros too. I have found with therapists that they tend to have a superior attitude, they seem to forget that places could easily have been reversed - I'm not stupid.

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I've got a lot of help from various nutritional stuff, also tai-chi & qi gong - any other suggestions for support other than meds?

Getting the right amount of sleep, aerobic exercise, and a diet that meets your needs covers a whole lot

of ground and can mean the difference between your meds kind of working vs. being stable. So it's good

that you've been looking at nutrition and exercise already.

Periodically taking a day to just NOT handle the demands placed on you or to tend to ONLY your OWN

priorities is way underrated.

Therapy is highly recommended - to help you deal with the fallout from the psych problems and/or coach

you in interacting usefully once the brain cooties have been calmed down a bit. (i.e., I don't think that

yakking about momma at $200/hr is going to do squat for bipolar disorder. Popping a pill isn't going to

cut it for healing psychological trauma or for remediating poor social skills.)

As far as other stuff - it depends on what ails you and what you take for it. Orange juice is great stuff.

It's just not the right thing to wash Adderall down with. St. John's Wort can be a useful antidepressant -

in a way that makes it a bad idea for folks with bipolar and some atypical depressives, and really bad

news for someone on an MAOI.

Personally, I'm becoming convinced that the flourescent lighting in my office is NOT helping matters.

I'm dragging in a desk lamp to see if more/broader spectrum light does help. So maybe doing some

"life organizing" (Jemini might call it "mindfulness") to identify and remove the crap that ain't helping

matters is in order.

* I've said this before - as olfactory cues are known to be closely tied to memories and current moods,

I think there is a place for aromatherapy as an adjunct. As long as you aren't allergic, spending too

much money, or ditching your meds, they can't hurt. For things like SI and PTSD where there may be

specific memory/behavior triggers they might tbe very useful.

PS noni & goji juice r considered super-foods with lots of goodies in them, homeopathics also work for some people, despite mainstream views. I also like energetic healing methods - zenith, magnified healing, chironic healing etc. Crystal healing can b good also, but a bit strong sometimes

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Quote from article in Bottom Line Daily Health News (free eletter) May 11 2006,

'YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT

We've heard it before. You are what you eat. And, in particular, Simontacchi is concerned that not enough attention is being paid to the connection between our diets and our brains. The implications are enormous, influencing everything from behavior disturbances in childhood to memory loss and cognitive decline in old age. "The food industry has altered our consumption of basic nutrients so our brains are deprived of the essential building blocks required for them to function optimally," she explained. "Our food is literally making us crazy."

RESEARCH FOR THE CRAZY MAKERS

As part of the research for her book, The Crazy Makers, Simontacchi conducted a study on the influence of diet on cognition and mood. She gave a test group of typical high school students -- who had been either skipping breakfast or grabbing a donut or some other carbohydrate-filled nutritionally devoid food -- a breakfast shake of protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and omega-3 fatty acids. She did a before-and-after comparison of their results on a standardized mood test (Profile of Mood States, or POMS), which measures, among other things, tension, anger, depression, hostility, fatigue and confusion. "The results were so good, we had to rerun the statistics to verify the findings," Simontacchi told me. "The drink made a significant difference in how these teenagers felt emotionally." Since low levels of certain amino acids and essential fats have been frequently shown in both animal and human studies to be associated with aggression, hostility and other behavior problems, the results were not surprising to her.'

Further to the above,

'The worst offenders in most American diets today, according to Simontacchi, are...

1. Breakfast cereals (they have a high sugar content).

2. "Lunchables" (they contain 40 to 60 g of sugar and more than 750 mg of sodium).

3. Soft drinks (high sugar and chemicals).

4. Snack foods such as potato chips (high sodium).

5. Ice cream.

6. Juice drinks.

IS DEPRESSION FOOD RELATED?

"When an adolescent's nutritionally challenged diet has deprived his brain of the molecules needed to make calming, soothing neurotransmitters, and he feels overwhelmed with negative feelings, he lashes out in anger. He drinks more soft drinks and eats more junk food and this temporarily makes him feel better but escalates the bad mood. Junk food (high-carb, high-sugar, high-fat, high-salt products) may be a form of self-medication. Some of the self-destructive behavior we see in teenagers may well be the result of depression they have no resources to resolve." Simontacchi explained that it would not be correct to say that depression is completely caused by diet, but poor nutrition can trigger it in susceptible people who start out at a biochemical or nutritional deficit. "It is then a double whammy when the body is harmed by the sugar and salt and simultaneously deprived of quality nutrition it needs to function at its best."

Adults pay the price for a diet heavy in processed foods as well. The cognitive decline often seen in aging -- from "senior moments" to vascular dementia -- is often accompanied by serious nutrient deficiencies. "Cognitive decline actually mimics deficiencies of folic acid and vitamin B-12," she told me, "and B-12 is a particularly difficult nutrient for older people to absorb well."

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http://www.wholehealthmd.com/ME2/dirmod.as...Remedies&tier=1

This is a list of food remedies from wholehealthmd.com, listed by disorder. Click on "depression" or whatever ails you, and it will tell you what you should eat, and why.

I'm eating off the depression and PMS lists, and it has made a difference in how I feel.

Of course, I used to just go forever without eating, so probably just keeping my blood sugar up helps.

Try the lists, though.

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Quote from article in Bottom Line Daily Health News (free eletter) May 11 2006,

Adults pay the price for a diet heavy in processed foods as well. The cognitive decline often seen in aging -- from "senior moments" to vascular dementia -- is often accompanied by serious nutrient deficiencies. "Cognitive decline actually mimics deficiencies of folic acid and vitamin B-12," she told me, "and B-12 is a particularly difficult nutrient for older people to absorb well."

Beware of deliberately misleading statements like the above.

What is stated:

1. A looks like B to the writer.

2. If true, random statement C should make B look more plausible.

The conclusion the reader is expected to make:

3. Therefore A is B.

Because neither the researcher nor the book reviewer actually says that A is B, they're off the

hook legally.

Instead of looking for the obvious - studies that at least show that folic acid abd B-12 deficiencies correlate

to or even accompany "cognitive decline in aging" - most people will go out and buy B supplements.

OK, preferably they'd buy the book and then the supplements.

Then again, for all YOU know I may own stock in Krispy Kreme , or Geni-Soy . ;)

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