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Prevalence of the BP diagnosis


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It seems to be clear that those CB members with a BP dx form the largest group on the boards (either that or we're just more talkative than others - it helps that we go through high energy manic periods). I've been thinking about this and the fact that the # of stories in the news about people who throw out the claim - "oh I'm bipolar" - seems to be increasing. Do you think that doctors are becoming more likely to assign this dx than others? Particularly now that it's recognised that there's a BP spectrum that covers more than types 1 and 2?

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i don't know...but according to the NIMH, 2.6% of the US is bipolar (probably means just I & II since that's what they cover in their bipolar section). Compare this with 9.5% for depression.

i noticed the same disparity on these boards and assumed it was cuz bipolars are more chatty/energetic. but how much energy does it take to sit in a chair in front of a computer and type anyway? i don't see why the other disorders couldn't talk as much.

...but then again, major depressive disorder affects 6.7% of the population (i'm not counting the dysthymics and other depressives because these boards tends to attract more severe cases), more than double the % of bipolars...so, the depression board should be more than twice as big...but it's not. so, i think that says something about the nature of bipolar.

i think probably more people are getting the dx for 2 reasons. first, the spectrum, expanded criteria. second, more people are turning out to be bipolar than previously believed. i think it's normal to push the envelope, test the boundaries of a theory--in this case, letting more people be bipolar. ultimately, the rubber band will start to bounce back when people realize that the medication & therapy for bipolar is making them sicker. (positive- sick from wrong meds / negative- not getting the right meds or therapy about source of problems) that is the trade they make for sporting the romance or convenience of a bipolar dx.

on the other hand, it might be hard for some of these people and their pdocs to see how bad the bp dx is working out. some bp's seem to accept life as a zombie. i've been to bipolar support groups where most of the people were so slow and leaden. and they talk about how good their meds have been at squashing their so-called hypomanias. (god it irks me when people throw that word around)

ultimately, bipolar treatment (which is what the dx is all about) sucks. side effects, killjoy, and is forever. Is that what these bipolar wannabes and trendy pdocs really want? let them have this cake, i say. they're going to have a hard time eating it.

7

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how much energy does it take to sit in a chair in front of a computer and type anyway? i don't see why the other disorders couldn't talk as much
Good point. I was thinking about that comment later on today and realised that it did sound a bit silly.

ultimately, the rubber band will start to bounce back when people realize that the medication & therapy for bipolar is making them sicker. (positive- sick from wrong meds / negative- not getting the right meds or therapy about source of problems) that is the trade they make for sporting the romance or convenience of a bipolar dx.

You're right - there does seem to be a certain "romance" attached to the dx. I've been wondering why and concluding that it's just popular culture that's made it that way. A screenplay or novel containing some reference to mental illness is far more likely to use references to BP rather than major depression. Perhaps they think it sounds sexier to say "I have bipolar disorder" rather than "I'm depressed". Those of us who know the truth are the ones are going to suffer, in the sense that public opinion seems to be shifting towards not taking it as seriously as it should.

It reminds me of how many kids are being diagnosed with ADD/ADHD these days. Far more than 10 or 15 years ago. You could argue that in the past there simply weren't the tools to identify it, but on the other hand I think it's more likely that people are becoming inclined to use it as a scapegoat - a child who misbehaves is not just normal, but hyperactive. (Not saying that there can't be genuine cause for the dx, just that I think it's being overused.) Similarly someone who has a few moodswings is not just a normal person, but a bipolar person.

And yes, bipolar sucks. And the treatment is hard work and it's an illness that pervades every aspect of our lives. It irks me that those of us who are genuinely ill might be lumped in with those "wannabes" so that the illness isn't given the gravity it deserves.

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I work in public education (K-12) and in the past 10 years we've seen a marked increase in MI, especially BP, diagnosis. There is some contention that BP is the "buzz diagnosis" replacing ADD and ADHD which had been a very prevalent diagnosis. Doctors are very concerned, particularly with children, to attach a MI diagnosis to school records but there isn't always an alternate option. My take on this is that we are only beginning to touch the issue of genetic markers. Once we have the technology and knowledge to better evaluate the genetic factor in MI, we are going to find it is very widespread genetically. What I mean by that, is that a marker for depression may be relative common while a marker for psychosis may be less common but the combination of the two, in reproduction, will result in some of the disorders we see today. In subsequent generations the degree if illness, due to the constant, random cell mutations during cell division will likely increase.

What's really scary, and I just read some literature on the topic, is that we are not educating society proficiently. Teachers, as an example, really don't understand what these diagnoses entail but, rather, consider them to be an "excuse" for behavior or grades. The same exists with employers who, frankly, are inundated (whether they know it or not) with people who experience some form and degree of MI.

IMO, those percentages that are posted are negligable. You need to walk into a public school and determine your own percentages and you'll see they are much higher.

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What I mean by that, is that a marker for depression may be relative common while a marker for psychosis may be less common but the combination of the two, in reproduction, will result in some of the disorders we see today.In subsequent generations the degree if illness, due to the constant, random cell mutations during cell division will likely increase.
(my emphasis)

I'm not sure that that follows. You seem to be saying (please correct me if I'm wrong!) that increased diagnoses of the disease today will necessarily lead to increased diagnoses in the future due to random mutations occurring in cell division. If it is a fact (and it may not be) that there are more incorrect diagnoses of BP occurring now than was the case in the past, then it doesn't follow that there will be increases in the future. Unless pdocs continue on this route. I do agree though that it will probably be found that there are more genetic markers for mental illness than was previously thought.

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There is some contention that BP is the "buzz diagnosis" replacing ADD and ADHD which had been a very prevalent diagnosis.

IMO, those percentages that are posted are negligable. You need to walk into a public school and determine your own percentages and you'll see they are much higher.

According to NIMH, "An estimated 26.2 % of Americans ages 18 and older suffer from a diagnosable mental disorder in a given year."

DMF, you probably think that estimate is too low. I think it's way too high. I think some pdocs and instant-MIs are overestimating and overmedicating. My tdoc told me, if you walk into a pdoc's office, you're probably going to get a shiny new diagnosis. Yes, it's that easy.

I've walked into public schools. Even went to one. I think almost all of them act like

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Why on earth are people thinking that its "trendy" to have a BP diagnosis? I'm learning to accept myself, but come on. This is not a disease you want to have. I wouldn't rather have heart disease or diabetes or multiple sclerosis, but I would rather not having to worry about missing my meds and running yelling down the street hallucinating either. Or getting fired, because I have BP. Or ruining relationships and finances for having BP. Who gets fired for having diabetes? Or asthma?

I really don't feel super special for having this. And I don't feel cool saying, "Oh, yeah. I'm bipolar." *hairswing, huge excited smile*

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Bipolar Disorder as a diagnosis to desire? As romantic? Oy. Bipolar Disorder took my grandfather's life. It nearly took my dad's life on two occasions. It nearly ruined my family's life as I moved out with my kids, delusional, manic, on two occasions. Sure, the insane credit card bills are funny, the car I bought through fraud, very funny, my parents' bankruptcy because of my dad's all-night online gambling because he could NOT sleep and could NOT imagine NOT losing. The horrifying depressions that follow all this. Ah, the romance.

Romance, my ass. Mania, real mania, is not funny. One of my good friends, a real bipolar I, just came down from a real mania that we all begged him to see, and he was psychotic, convinced he was invincible, he had just finished law school, just passed the bar exam, and he had come up with a foolproof marketing idea to get clients...take DRUGS with them, make them trust him! Stay up all night, driving up and down the state, appearing in courts up and down the coast of CA, drugging and rocking and rolling baby. Oh, and threatening his wife and abandoning his kids and running out of money. And now he's got charges pressed against him, he's going to lose his licence to practice law (the license he just earned), his wife is divorcing him, he can't see his kids without supervision, and he's HOMELESS. That's mania.

These are the reasons why I take my meds. And why I read the posts here and try to figure out this damned bizzare disease. And I pray people that really need help, get help and people that don't have bipolar get out of the way so they don't make things harder for those of us that really need help. Becuase this thing really sucks.

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I can't speak for other people, but this is my opinion of the dx-ing of the BP dx and other MI:

Sometimes, we all go through tough shit. There is a difference between tough shit and MI. It is up to a pdoc to figure out why you feel like hell- is this a pattern? Is it genetic in your family? Do you have multiple symptoms that impact your life in noticiable ways? If so, then there is something to DX.

My cousin and boyfriend both have clear cases of OCD and admit it. However, have not been treated or seen by a pdoc.

On the other hand, there are people who run to any doctor over any hangnail, whether it be physical or psychological, and whine about it. We just live in a time and culture where pain is unacceptable.

As far as being a romantic or desireable illness to have, I hope that gets quashed the moment they have to live on the meds we take and face the stigma that goes with MI. I've never been treated "cool" due to my BP- in fact, far from it!!! And the side effects of my meds, my quality of life, everything suffers due to my disorder. Wannabe BPers would just get crushed under the side effects and stigma I think. You'd only put up with these side effects if the benefit outweighed the problem.

My dad killed himself 2 years ago- BP1. My sister was in the nut bin for 8 months. I have an aunt who is in an institution and will never get out. I've been to the hospital as an inpatient 5 times. This has ruined my marriage, caused and ruined 3 pregnancies, and the number of jobs- I can't begin to count.

I think any "fad" will go away if people are treated for it and realize it isn't fun stuff.

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Sorry, here's where my post was supposed to be going:

1. In public schools, I am surprised by the very large number of students with MI diagnosis, particularly BP. This was the case not quite a generation ago with the over-diagnosis of ADD and ADHD. It's as though the doctors had to come up with "something" and this was it. That doesn't mean every child whose record states s/he is bipolar or whatever truly is, what is does mean is that it's scary as hell to think the plethora of diagnoses being made in this age group could, in fact, be true. Statistics show that approximately 1% of the population age 18 and over suffer from bipolar - you will find that percentage much higher when looking at diagnoses for older adolescents and teens.

2. Assuming that the above is true (we are seeing more diagnoses with this generation), it implies that the genetic theory could be very relavant. We are only starting to see advances in finding genetic markings and truly understanding them. Assuming that all MI is inheritable (and who knows if it is), if 3 generations ago parent A had a marker for depression and parent B had no MI harder, the offspring had an x percentage of getting that marker during cell division. In the next generation, let's say that offspring inherited the depression marker and then mated with a person with a different MI marker, the subsequent offspring has the potential to get two different genetic markers that might or might not create symptoms, but the markers are still there. In the third generation, the second generation offspring now has two different markers and lets say s/he mates with someone with a schizophrenic marker - what potential could happen to their offspring?

I'm not a scientist, but the consideration is there that with each subsequent generation we are finding more diagnoses of MI - partly because it's not "closeted" any longer, partly because we have effective treatments and people are willing to step forward to get help, but perhaps partly because of genetics. Now that is what's really scary.

In our schools, I'd like to think the diagnoses are exaggerated but you should see the list of medications these kids are on. I honestly don't know what to think except that one of two things are happening - we have a whole lot of bipolar (and other things) out there or we have a lot of doctors misdiagnosing and mistreating. It ticks me off to think that this is "popular" but I also see a lot of parents (too many) quick to want to diagnose a medical problem vs. seeing that some of this stuff kids go through is just about being a kid, environmental, parental (iykwim), etc.

Hopes that clarifies it a little. I didn't mean to upset anyone.

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I totally understand what you're talking about. I just hate to see anyone ding'd with the BP diagnosis, either from thinking hey, I've got mood swings, sounds like me, OR hey, my kid's got mood swings, sounds like him/her and then on come the meds or doctor visits or whatever....and then they get thrown into the statistical mix and probably fall away when lo and behold, they don't really need those meds or those doctor visits after all.

I know what you're getting at all too well from a different angle actually because my son has autism and the diagnosis of autism has swung into a spectrum diagnosis recently and now the dx comes much more freely and the statistics are now through the roof! It's freaking everyone out, including teachers, and doctors are scrambling for answers as to why so many kids are getting pinned with the label of autism and what does it really mean anymore? Is it because the stigma is lifting and now we can really dx properly? Is it because of the genetic markers like you were talking about? Is it because of the opening up of the spectrum and the looseness of the diagnosing? Or is it that people are more educated about the illness and so diagnosis can happen earlier and more effectively? All the same questions with autism as with things like BP...

I just get frustrated easily because there's a lot of hurt in my family. I don't want to see BP become some kind of "illness du jour" and suddenly people are scoffing at it as some sort of mood swing thing when it really is much more than that. Painfully more than that, as we here can attest, sadly.

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I'm with you, ChesireCat. I'd give anything for none of this to be affecting my daughter, your son, or any other human being. It is insulting to think that people are "playing" with these diagnoses just like it's incredibly painful to not have a single doctor finger exactly what is wrong with your child thus "experimenting" with medications, medication adjustments, etc. all at their personal expense. You made some excellent points about how we have advanced in medicine and perhaps we are just more capable of making these diagnoses as opposed to 10 - 15 years ago. I've read some posts on these boards of people who suffered terribly without diagnosis or treatment - I can't even imagine what they went through. What I don't want to happen, though, if for a diagnosis of BP or whatever to become so common place that it takes away from the true suffering and effort it takes to get through every single day. This brings to mind one child at the high school I used to work at who liked to throw around the word "bipolar" as an excuse for what might have been poor choices on her part. At the time, my daughter didn't have any problems and I knew very little about the disorder but I knew enough to realize that I wasn't going to be able to "tell" if she was truly bipolar or not (my job, at the time, did not give me the resources to see medical records). On the other hand, it sure seemed that she brought it up at convenient times (when work wasn't turned in, when she acted out, when she decided to skip class). I don't know if she was bipolar or not but I sure would like to sit her down today and gently tell her that if she's not, and is just "using" the term, to thank God for little blessings because being bipolar isn't an excuse, it's not an easy out, and it's not exactly a joyful way to live. =(

I hope your son is doing well, Chesire.

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It reminds me of how many kids are being diagnosed with ADD/ADHD these days. Far more than 10 or 15 years ago. You could argue that in the past there simply weren't the tools to identify it, but on the other hand I think it's more likely that people are becoming inclined to use it as a scapegoat - a child who misbehaves is not just normal, but hyperactive. (Not saying that there can't be genuine cause for the dx, just that I think it's being overused.) Similarly someone who has a few moodswings is not just a normal person, but a bipolar person.

Ah yes, the ol' ADD/ADHD explosion. Here's a dacet I bet y'all never thought of...(complicated, convoluted explanation ahead)

Blame the ADA and overachieving parents. Really! See, under ADA rules, kids with such disorders as ADD get extra time on tests. This includes the SATs etc. and extra time for such tests as LSATs and GREs is being pushed--how successfully, I'm not quite sure.

So. What does the parent who wants their kid to succeed do? Well, they can go find a doc that can be pushed around, push for an ADD dx, and go on there merry way down the road, where their kid gets all sorts of extra time on tests and other accomodations.

And in a sense, bp can be kinda like that, but in a different setting. Which is why you see people accused of crimes claiming bp. Because everybody knows we're crazy and do nutty, stupid, and too often (well, for me, heh) illegal things. Whether the perp comes up with it himself or the lawyer suggests it, well, there it is. I'm sure some would rather go for a schz dx because, well, that's something that's seen as even worse than bp, right? Except it's harder to fake.

And oh yeah--just read last night that the guy who won Surivor season 9 (God, there's that many???) recently got busted for lying to get a month off work, half of which he spent hopping around Europe promoting Survivor. His excuse for getting a month off? Stress and depression.

It boils down to one thing: people go for easy to fake dx's in order to gain advantage, or to weasel their way out of trouble. That's my take, and I'm stickin' to it.

seven--

I think almost all of them act like
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What I mean by that, is that a marker for depression may be relative common while a marker for psychosis may be less common but the combination of the two, in reproduction, will result in some of the disorders we see today. In subsequent generations the degree if illness, due to the constant, random cell mutations during cell division will likely increase.
(my emphasis)

I'm not sure that that follows. You seem to be saying (please correct me if I'm wrong!) that increased diagnoses of the disease today will necessarily lead to increased diagnoses in the future due to random mutations occurring in cell division....

I think the problem is that psychologists and psychiatrists tend to mate! ;)

S Sorry to be flip (I realize the inference has been corrected) but I couldn't resist.

As far as the ca 25% estimate on MI dxes in a given year, check out this Harvard study on lifetime incidence!

http://www.crazyboards.org/forums/index.php?showtopic=11115

As the dxes are used more liberally (and yes, to a degree, modishly), there seems to be a backlash. You'd think the stigma would decrease, but in fact, I sense a greater distancing of the average "normal" shmo from the MI, with an increase of an US 'n Them mentality (here the "Them" is US!). At least, publicly.

First, these stats are for estimated , UNDIAGNOSED incidence - not #s of people who get the dxes in the context of treatment, which is a huge difference.

And the more studies like these two hit the news, the more the meaning of the disability is trivialized in our "ownership" society (you know, as in you own your problems completely. Can someone who owns his cancer stop the cells from proliferating?).

See how the insanity defense is less and less effective? As you probably know the Law increasingly even has the gall and lack of compassion/understanding to convict a person who commits a crime while off his nut, and then evaluate (and prosecute) him once he's been medicated back to normalcy (relatively).

rt.

EDIT: Finally, I DO see a definite trendiness to diagnoses. It's not only BP that's more acceptable (hence more used), but so is Aspergers. As for ADD, it's used to describe somewhere between 14-25% of school boys! More of them now? Sure. THAT many more, though?

Can't help suspecting that one big driver for this increase in diagnoses IS Big Pharma. Related to desinstitutionalization too. Socially, it's cheaper to medicate people than to teach, heal and inspire them. Remember SOMA in Brave New World?

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Ooh, SOMA... That book really freaked me out.

After working in the systems for going on 5 years now (I'm still an amateur, but not an idiot) I have seen kids with ADHD. Bad. And kids that have an ADHD diagnosis, but are actually products of inattentive parents who feed them Mountain Dew for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. I've also seen a rise in Asperger's, but so far only one kid didn't fit the bill. Whatever hillbilly moronic doctor he went to needs to slapped on both ears. I've only seen 2 kids, both girls, who had true BP diagnoses, and I believe they really have BP. Both have extenuating circumstances that either caused or exaberated their symptoms.

I've been reading alot about the role of attachment in infancy and childhood, and I'm beginning to form major theories on what these "disorders" really are and where they actually originated.

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And oh yeah--just read last night that the guy who won Surivor season 9 (God, there's that many???) recently got busted for lying to get a month off work, half of which he spent hopping around Europe promoting Survivor. His excuse for getting a month off? Stress and depression.

Oh, sure. Of course, any of us would fall into a depression if we won $1,000,000 in a silly game show. Perhaps he feels tortured over the number of worms/rats/vermin he had to eat during the course of it. Life sucks eh?

Anyway, some more mixed up thoughts :

I suddenly wondered if I've been focusing too heavily on the media and the American aspect of this and what I'm seeing on the net. Out of interest I just hunted down stats on BP diagnostic trends in my own country (South Africa). The current figures show that only 0.1% of the population has been assigned the dx. This has to be seen in the bigger picture though - psychiatric care is extremely expensive and not readily available to the entire population. Those who can't afford private care are relegated to the public system, which is pretty dire. (I've had friends stuck in wards in the city's general psychiatric hospital, and it amazes me that they're still alive and walking today.) But that's not the point - in this case we could probably ask how many people are going UNdiagnosed in this system, as compared to what's going on in the wealthier United States. The stats don't take our broader context into consideration.

On the other hand, I do not underestimate the power of American culture and the reach it has over this part of the world. Certainly - as someone who works in the education system here - I can say that without a doubt we've followed the trend of childhood ADHD diagnoses that you're seeing over there. I might wonder though if the same is going to be true of the BP dx, given that it's more complex and expensive to treat. Who knows?

As far as my own experience working and being in psychiatric care goes, I have seen an increased tendency to use "bipolar" as a buzzword. I know of at least 4 different people at work- excluding myself - who've (rightly or wrongly) been diagnosed as BP. My boss isn't terribly discreet and has been known to throw away lovely lines such as "oh, she's on leave - bipolar you know" (much rolling of eyes). I've found it terribly frustrating as I've had to be hospitalised several times over the past few years. It doesn't do your employment record much good if HR and your immediate superiors secretly think that you're a malingering idiot.

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I think part of what we're seeing is "self-diagnosis".

Some of these "Bipolars" have attached the label to themselves so they have an excuse for their mood swings. It absoves them somewhat from taking resonsibility for their actions. These are the same type of people who attach the "Aspberger's" label to themselves as an excuse for being rude.

IN

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I think part of what we're seeing is "self-diagnosis".

Some of these "Bipolars" have attached the label to themselves so they have an excuse for their mood swings. It absoves them somewhat from taking resonsibility for their actions. These are the same type of people who attach the "Aspberger's" label to themselves as an excuse for being rude.

When I first met a BP lady and heard her story, I thought WOW that is just exactly what I'm going through. I felt half scared, since her life clearly was a train smash, half exhilerated, I had a handle on what was wrong with me.

Also she had Lithium which held hope of an "out" if this got too Bad.

However clearly Lithium was no joy, in fact it was obviously bloody nasty so I certainly did not rush out and demand some. So I left the issue there, opting to see how long I could ride it out.

Answer. Decades.

Often ruddy miserable decades but decades never-the-less.

Over the decades I learnt more, like "Oh with BP it's at least six months up and six months down and the up's are way way up" that is _not_ me. So I shrugged my shoulders and said, I'm not BP and....

Carried on.

Then it all got worse and worse, the downs got worse, the up's more ecstatic (or dysphoric). I have lived with Unipolars and clearly I wasn't unipolar. Just not the same beast at all.

Still by hiding, by pretending, by hanging on I can get through the hour or five of suicidal hell and back into bounce bounce bounce mode.

Not the wild empty the bank balance high, but high enough to regularly get me into minor trouble at work and the like. I have become very good about the "postpone" button on emails, biting my tongue, vanishing, hiding, hiding.

With the media attention on BP I took another look at the problem. They seem to have new treatments, perhaps it's worth a look again. Ah wait, there is more fine print on this stuff, there is BPII and there is this Rapid cycler and there is Ultradian cyclers.... maybe I am a variety of BP.

So what to do about it? Pitch up and the doc and beg for meds? Hmm, look watch, they really really don't seem to be very good at this meds thing, especially for ultradians. Hmm, fair percentage of the time it makes things worse before they get around to making it better. I can't risk that, I'm sort of coping now, if it gets any worse I won't be.

Read, research occasionally. Find Crazyboards.

It was a distinct Aha! moment when I discovered that the dysphoria was a close brother of the mania. Wow! That made sense.

So now I have self-diagnosed myself as BP ultradian,

So what? What now?

By reading Crazyboards I have a _very_ good understanding of how lucky I am. I'm nowhere near as deeply in the poo as most of the folk here.

There clearly is a wide spectrum here, some have got it bad bad bad. some have got it bad, but not so bad they can't get by.

I'm not a better person because I can cope, just luckier. I really really really don't envy those deeper in than me. I read some of the tales here and just cry.

Nobody could possibly envy the pain and trouble related in these forums. You just have to wish and wish and wish that those poor sods deeper in than you can find a way, any way, meds, therapy whatever, that will take that pain and despair from them.

If you where to ask the community around me, they would unanimously say I'm functional. A bit weird. A bit of a loner, has his moments, somewhat, ah, um, er, independent, but basically functioning well in society.

Yet if you were to ask your PDoc if cycling between deeply suicidal, so locked in depression as to be unable to type three words in an hour, to ecstatically joyful every day, often several times a day is normal, I gather the answer would be no.

Does it absolve me from my mood swings?

Can't say I ever thought it did.

The only thing my self diagnosis gives me is a clue.

Just a clue, a hint, that perhaps what I'm so sad about, so angry about, so happy about isn't so dreadful so horrible so great.

Gives me a clue to perhaps I should hit the postpone key and send this email later, perhaps instead of shouting and swearing I should get up quickly and go for a walk. Perhaps instead of revealing my despair to my long suffering wife a long walk around the block would be better.

I keep reading crazyboards, watching learning. I have learnt many coping mechanisms over the years, but it takes no great genius to see my situation is getting worse and I will eventually cease to cope.

I hope to have some idea of which way to go at that point.

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Incidentally, the 1% figure is for BP1. If you add in the rest of the BP spectrum, I believe BPII is about another 1% (these numbers are from memory and are not exact) and BP-NOS and cyclothymia make another 3%. This is from a recent study which I might be able to find again if someone wants it.

Much of this is from people who would have formerly been diagnosed with just depression. Similarly, with Asperger's, the rise in diagnosis in the one area studied by the paper I remember was equivalent to the drop in non-specific mental retardation diagnoses.

Does anyone on here actually know anyone who has been officially diagnosed with BP, yet you don't think they have it? If the overdiagnosis theory is correct, there should be at least some. Likewise, at least someone should have heard of an anecdote regarding misdiagnosis as BP through the media.

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Noemie,

I honestly believe there are teenagers out there, particularly girls, who have been misdiagnosed. Heck, even my daughter's own doctor has stated that it's really difficult to tell the difference between being a hormonal teen and a teen with bipolar. Granted, as time goes on the sympoms become more definitive or, is it possible, the patient focuses more on those symptoms having been given a diagnosis? I don't know but I do worry about what we are doing to our children with all these different diagnoses.....sometimes it's just growing up (and sometimes it's not).

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