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"How Paxil Ruined My Life For Awhile"


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Okay, okay. Y'all stop feeling sorry for yourselves. Sheesh.

This guy went on Paxil because he's a journalist. Journalists do stuff like that, it's called dedication to craft.

So how about the article? This guy had every side effect in the book, and finally quit because the Paxil totally changed his personality. I found it significant that he lost his creativity and contemplated getting an office job! Isn't that a little scary?

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It's worrisome to me that he is presenting a vivid and anecdotal picture of antidepressant effects, without highlighting the fact that most people who take antidepressants do so because the symptoms are worse than the treatment - or highlighting the fact that these drugs might work differently in mentally healthy people than in the mentally ill.

What people are going to remember about that article is that 1) some people take antidepressants when they don't need them to try for an advantage at the game of life (the article only presents one person but a lot of people are already prepared to believe this), 2) antidepressants have unpleasant side effects (well, duh - the issue is what sucks worse), and 3) they're fun to mix with alcohol.

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Guest Guest_Frosty_*

Weird ... my first Pdoc about 10years ago big Head of Psychiatry at some Hospital

said to me" These pills aren't going to change who you are, just bring back the person who you were..."

That journalist needs to figure that out.. Any person on meds knows the wrong pills can really mess you up,

and create a monster.. Thats why we have Doctors and our own intelligence to know that hey This stuff is

not working.. I like the journalist story about when all he ate was food from a well known fast food joint for a month and it almost killed him...

Frosty...

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...its called dedication to craft..

Gosh I handn't heard that phrase in a while. ;)

Actually, this is called creating a story where none existed.

I would be much happier if he would follow this story by putting himself on Digoxin for his heart for 3 months, or going on kidney dialysis, all inappropriately.

Most of us who have used the meds will recognize the side effects. It's actually reassure to me to see that a normal person has them too. I didn't just make them up. Likewise the experiment is actually interesting.

I just wish this fellow was a more responsible person & journalist instead of a smart aleck. I wish he had worked WITH a doctor rather than just manipulate one to get a script. A follow up by going to therapy as the doctor actually suggestted to him would be appropriate and ultimately more helpful to him and us.

a.m.

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I'm glad he got withdrawls. ;)

Ditto.

And that person, my friends, is what I like to call an "idge."

Start up side effects suck? It's called starting on a lower dose.

Withdrawals? Anyone that EDUCATES themselves about SSRIs knows you cannot go off them cold turkey.

It's people like this that scare truly MI people into thinking they don't need drugs. I was one of those people who were scared off by stories like this, even when my life was in near-total shambles.

"Since starting on Paxil, I've been drinking like a fish." "Before Paxil, while working on stories, turns of phrase would pop into my head, fully formed."

O rly? Anti-d's have the opposite effect on me.

"I recognize the feeling: It's like being on ecstasy!"

Um...yeah. Not really. SSRIs do not FLOOD the brain with serotonin.

"I'd read about these on the Paxil Database, a site for self-proclaimed Paxil victims, but I thought they were made up—there are so many hypochondriacs on the Web."

And now you're one of them! Congrats!

"In retrospect, it was a bad idea to screw with my brain chemistry and possibly inflict lifelong damage..."

Studies? Gotta love the "lifelong brain damage" trump card. I'll believe it when it's SCIENTIFICALLY PROVEN!

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A couple of points here.

1) Paxil takes a good 4 weeks to become theraputically effective. Any perceived significant benefit in the first week or so is most likely from either side effects or a placebo effect.

2) Minimum timeframe for SSRI treatment is 6-12 months. Most people need more.

3) This guy's individual experience does not reflect empirical evidence. Most people have a good experience with Paxil.

4) Withdrawing cold turkey from the paxil after 2 months of usage is both silly and potentially dangerous.

5) The prescribed dosage of 20mg may not have been enough for this individual to gain therapeutic benefit. Many people take 40 or even 60mg.

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A couple of points here.

1) Paxil takes a good 4 weeks to become theraputically effective. Any perceived significant benefit in the first week or so is most likely from either side effects or a placebo effect.

2) Minimum timeframe for SSRI treatment is 6-12 months. Most people need more.

3) This guy's individual experience does not reflect empirical evidence. Most people have a good experience with Paxil.

4) Withdrawing cold turkey from the paxil after 2 months of usage is both silly and potentially dangerous.

5) The prescribed dosage of 20mg may not have been enough for this individual to gain therapeutic benefit. Many people take 40 or even 60mg.

I have to respectfully disagree with you about points one and five. I take .5 mg of Paxil 2 weeks out of the month for PMDD. The anti-depressant/anti-dysphoric effects hit exactly six hours after I take it.

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A couple of points here.

1) Paxil takes a good 4 weeks to become theraputically effective. Any perceived significant benefit in the first week or so is most likely from either side effects or a placebo effect.

2) Minimum timeframe for SSRI treatment is 6-12 months. Most people need more.

3) This guy's individual experience does not reflect empirical evidence. Most people have a good experience with Paxil.

4) Withdrawing cold turkey from the paxil after 2 months of usage is both silly and potentially dangerous.

5) The prescribed dosage of 20mg may not have been enough for this individual to gain therapeutic benefit. Many people take 40 or even 60mg.

I have to respectfully disagree with you about points one and five. I take .5 mg of Paxil 2 weeks out of the month for PMDD. The anti-depressant/anti-dysphoric effects hit exactly six hours after I take it.

How can you take 0.5 mg of paxil when it comes in 20mg tablets? Are you talking about the same drug here?

Tom

I take half of a 10mg tablet.

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>> I take half of a 10mg tablet.

That's crazy how you can actually feel 5mg of Paxil. I wish i was as med sensitive as you.

Tom

I'm just sensitive, period. That also means I'm super-sensitive to caffiene, sugar, over-stimulation, sunlight, stress... I'm fragile as shit.

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It doesnt change the fact that for the average person 20mg is the minimum therapeutic dose. Lets not compare empirical evidence with perrsonal experiences here.

Also on point 5 I said "may" based on his experience. I stand by that. Whether or not you only need a 5mg dose is irrelavant to his situation. Most people need more.

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It doesnt change the fact that for the average person 20mg is the minimum therapeutic dose. Lets not compare empirical evidence with perrsonal experiences here.

Also on point 5 I said "may" based on his experience. I stand by that. Whether or not you only need a 5mg dose is irrelavant to his situation. Most people need more.

The article was based on the journalist's personal experience. Every post on this site is based on a personal experience. You're saying that this guy's account of his personal experience with Paxil can't possibly be correct because of empirical evidence that says otherwise. I say, Huh?

Plus, I don't think a theraputic experience was the journalist's intention, since he wasn't necessarily depressed when he started treatment. I think the article was written as a statement to the over-prescribing of anti-depressants to people who really don't need them.

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Thats not true. We often refer to studies when posting on this site. When a drug company recommends a dosage range for a drug it is based on both private and and independent empirical studies. That is different to claims made based on personal experience. This is where the recommended doses come from. They wont suit everyone but they will suit most people.

Social anxiety falls within the group of conditions that may be treated by SSRI anti-depressants, which was the main issue of the author. As the saying goes there are no guarantees that any one SSRI will work for an individual, but most individuals will respond well to at least one from the group.

Im not saying that his account of usage cant be "true" nor am I saying that yours cannot be true. But they are outside of the norm. Most people will respond in a certain way to a certain dose. Not everyone but most people. This doesnt mean that people's personal experiences arent important. But when they fall out of the norm any conclusions drawn must be guarded.

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Heya,

Idiot.

Okay, he's got a point which got lost somewhere in his idiocy.

Take chemo for a few weeks and tell me how it feels when the treatment is worse than the disease you don't have.

Ugh.

Idiot.

(Sorry. Long day.)

--ncc--

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I feel like going off on a rant.

I can't believe that idiot doctor prescribed it to him in the first place, I can't believe he thought he needed it in the first place. "social anxiety"? kiss my ass. when you're too scared to leave your fucking room and you can't even enter a room with more than four people -- what the hell does he think his problem is? I don't mean to minimize anyone's issues, but I think he needs to gain some self confidence, stop fucking around, and the whole world needs to realize that this isn't a game to most of us. this isn't some lack of ability to small talk, this is our lack of ability to go out in public, to sit with our backs to a door, to go through a day without having a panic attack mirroring a heart attack.

god dammit. this is not a game.

I'm sorry, all. I'm very pissed off. I also can't believe that he drank alcohol so much with Paxil. that's THE no-no.

and, lastly. my meds might not work for you. I personally don't think that SSRIs hold anything up against a nice warm fluffy benzo for panic. your meds might not work for me. you can't discount anything, even what seems like the stupidest thing, because for someone it's going to work.

most of all, I am damned envious. he can go off the meds, feel those emotions, and I (we) can't. more than anything, I agree that the lack of emotions is the worst part of taking my meds, and I wish more than anything that I could be funtional without them. I'm only fourteen, god dammit, why the hell can't I live when I'm not on crazy meds? (for the record, I'm crying here. he is so fucking lucky that he can just walk away when we can't ever. I hate my meds. I hate them but they keep me alive so I love them.)

I'll stop now. tomorrow morning I'll regret posting this, but. thanks.

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Since when is being shy a psychiatric disorder?? That is a personality trait that can be uncomfortable, but not something you need meds. for. People are different. The writer of this inane article is a little too flippant for my palate. Coming from someone who will most likely be on psych. meds. for the rest of my life, I find it really sucks when people want to toy w/ something as serious as being MI. If it weren't for my meds, I don't think I would be alive right now. Scary, but true.

Yes, side effects. For those who really need MI meds. the side effects are usually way better than the originally MI symptoms.

Okay, this guy really pisses me off. And the drinking thing. That is a totally irresponsible thing to do, much less advertise. What if some unsuspecting young med newbie were to read that and think-oh cool, alcolhol.

Well, dammit. You can't drink alcohol on psych. meds. It is very very bad. Maybe some people can drink a wee occasional drink- even that sends me into mixed state hell.

What an asshole. Brain zaps-yep!-they really do suck. And yes, he really did deserve them. I've had them before and wouldn't wish them on my worst enemy. But, anyone who is so demeaning to the meds that help me to be able to be a semi-good mom and hold down a full-time job, they fu#@ing deserve it.

End rant. mel1

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