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Is there anything other than "cognitive" therapy out there?


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I've been going to a mental health center recently that uses nothing but cognitive talk therapy. The psychiatrist and the therapist I'm seeing both say almost exactly the same things and try to steer the discussion away from issues I'm struggling with to "managing anxiety". While it's great to be so "on focus", it's like putting a band-aid on a stab wound. It seems like they try to make a complicated disorder very simple so that it's easier to treat. Telling me that depression and anxiety are caused by the way I think is the same thing as saying "It's all in your head".

Well, I guess that's just my problem, but is there any alternative out there to cognitive therapy or does everyone use it now? I really need an option.

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How about trying EMDR? The info about it is pinned in the PTSD board. Also a couple of threads about it there. Some people swear by it. Has been known to help with all kinds of things. I was going to give it a whirl, then my insurance ran out. I'm looking into finding a therapist here that offers it.

Breeze is a big cheerleader for it. I'm sure she wouldn't mind you PMing her if you have specific questions.

Croix

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I'm in analytic psychotherapy. Object Relations based. It takes time, but it is working for me....gradually....safely.....thoroughly....after all look how many years it took me to get the anxiety and such in the first place....

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I think CBT is the "preferred" therapy because it is short and simple. Insurance companies are starting to exert as much controll over mental health professionals as they have over MDs.

My Tdoc uses a combination of methods CBT is just one of several methods in his toolkit.

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There's something called "IPT" (interpersonal therapy maybe?) that comes out as well as CBT in studies, but it doesn't seem to be offered very often. I believe that IPT and CBT are currently the only therapy techniques supported by empirical research. A lot of people use other approaches, though. Many practitioners call themselves eclectic.

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IPT has good clinical supported trials showing it actually works. it's also designed to work in a set # of sessions so that's also good.

i'm also, like nestling, in psychotherapy that's object relations based, and it's helping me to get at the stuff that is leading me to think these thoughts (over worrying and self-defeating style thoughts) in the first place. i think it's helpful, but it's twice a week and it's a bit intense. i do think it's worth it for me though, and you may want to look into it.

as noemie pointed out, it's common now for a therapist to mix a lot of approaches. you may be more comfortable with someone who combines techniques.

i found my current therapist by calling a list of people on my plan, asking them what methods they used, and then having a meeting with the ones that seemed like they could be helpful until i found one whith whom i "clicked." i think it's often the click is more important than the method, so it's good to check out a few therapists if you can.

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  • 4 months later...

I am a huge proponent of EMDR. It can get to the root of your issues very quickly.

Like 5-6 sessions. This is an old thread, but if you're still around, PM me about.

That's really too bad Croix, EMDR would have been the ticket after Katrina for you.

Breeze

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i've been getting interpersonal talk therapy for over a year. we talk and when we come to a problem or something illogical that i'm thinking or doing, she brings me around to see the logic and admit that there's a problem, and we think of solutions.

sometimes it takes me awhile to implement the solutions, like it did with ex bf #1, and sometimes i do it quickly, like once i decided to break up with him i did it and it was/is final.

i personally don't deal with feelings a lot in therapy, and maybe i should more, but i just don't. it isn't that i don't trust my tdoc, it is just that i want to work on problems so i don't have negative feelings anymore. and when my dad died, it erased all my issues from my childhood and my teen years, and all the trauma i had taken- it was like that one huge loss eclipsed the other losses and made them seem to vanish.

but not to take up your thread, i'm a fan of this interpersonal talk therapy.

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I too, am in analytic psychotherapy, with a healthy dose of CBT thrown in when directly apllicable. We definitly talk about feelings, since feelings drive most of my problems. We've been at it four years now and I see real improvements, as does my therapist. The biggest hassle is getting authoization from my insurance to have more than the allotted 20 sessions per year. Of course, after a hospitalization, they are eager to extend the limit on therapy sessions without any argument.

Tommy

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  • 1 month later...
Guest d.fredell@gmail.com

Talk therapy can be helpful because you sometimes have to talk to get to the root, but I would suggest DBT. ;)

The poem at the bottom. Where did it come from. I don't recognize O.W.

thanks

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The poem at the bottom. Where did it come from. I don't recognize O.W.

thanks

Oscar Wilde

http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/f...onwritings.html

sorry I know nothing about the thread's subject

but your question d turned me to research-woman

grandson Merlin Holland has been researching Wilde's life for the last twenty years. He is the coeditor of The Complete Letters of Oscar Wilde. He has also edited Irish Peacock and Scarlet Marquess, the first uncensored publication of his grandfather's 1895 trials. Holland is currently working on a book about how the scandal caused by Wilde's trials affected his family, most notably his wife Constance and two sons Cyril and Vyvyan.

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Guest Guest_angeldivax_*

There's something called "IPT" (interpersonal therapy maybe?) that comes out as well as CBT in studies, but it doesn't seem to be offered very often. I believe that IPT and CBT are currently the only therapy techniques supported by empirical research. A lot of people use other approaches, though. Many practitioners call themselves eclectic.

Was about to post the same thing.

CBT is popular because there is strong empirical support for it-- unlike many forms of therapy. I'm a psych major and GAD/dysthymic (with MDD episodes) and I really like it, myself. Even though some of the cognitive aspects don't really work for me, I enjoy the behavioural aspect of it and find it helpful. Of course, nothing is going to work for everyone. And even practitioners within the CBT approach can vary a LOT, which confounds the issue-- look at Rational Emotive Therapy versus a strict Cognitive approach. Very different.

I'm not one to knock things that work for other people by ANY means, but the empirical support for EMDR is tenuous at best and it is still highly debated within the profession. A lot of professionals in the field are not that accepting of it. But seriously, if it works for people, that is all that matters.

Personally, I'd probably try a more talk-oriented therapy as a second choice.

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I don't know what the therapy is called, but my little brother is starting to have anxiety problems, and they want him to do this therapy with lights and hypnosis mixed with psychotherapy. Next time I talk to my parents I'll ask my mom what it's called. She's totally against it in her usual BP manic fashion, just wanting the docs to give my little brother some benzos. I told him to try the therapy, or he might end up like most of our family and on psych drugs for indefiniate ammounts of time.

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