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BP I & II differ in coping styles with mania


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I so related. My tactics were all but seek help. Couldn't stand patterns or strong colors. And I micromanage my behavior to the point where the machine just grinds to a halt.

Thanks for the article, Erika.

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I so related. My tactics were all but seek help. Couldn't stand patterns or strong colors. And I micromanage my behavior to the point where the machine just grinds to a halt.

Thanks for the article, Erika.

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<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I'm a help seeker, but I responded to this post to say amen to the avoidance of strong colors. Apparantly I requested the weirdest accommodation our Disability Student Services had ever had: that my exams be printed on white paper (my prof printed them on colored paper) because the colored paper was too stimulating. I had to get my pdoc to confirm that this was seriously a problem, and they finally relented. Must reduce stimuli, even down to paper.

Article was interesting.

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Thanks again for emailing it to me.  What I thought was going to be there wasn't, it was a post here.  Mania for me isn't euphoric, but I can feel it coming on when colors get too strong and patterns (clothes first, then I can see them in the sidewalk) and my brain starts racing and I can't keep track of any of it.  It's been hitting pretty regularly (yeah, we're managing a med change) but while I wait for seroquel to relax me and i'm out, I try to sing some song I know to try to calm myself.  But I can never remember how it goes.  It could be the alphabet song and I'll be like:  a, b, c..m, o, no shit, d, e, f m..o..fuck! a, b, what is that?..."

Depression I've lived with my whole life and tho I consider it an absolutely unacceptable way to be and am trying to find med stability, at least I understand it.  mania is, well, crazy.

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That is interesting...what I think is mroe interesting is that they claim people with BP2 are lessl ikely to have consequences of their disorder. That isn't true! I totally disagree that BP2 is less serious. Maybe they aren't jumping from cars on the highway, but the suicide rate is the same for the subtypes of BP. Death sounds like a consequence to me! It sounds like there needs to be a real awareness in the psych camp about BP2 being a true, serious health condition. Maybe that would stop the denial/blame pattern in these people and help them understand the importance of treatment.

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The way I read that comment from them is actually the way I experience it.  I'm BPII, and trust me, I'm well aware of the consequences of "swinging" through my life, especially the destructive hypomanias.  But until a stupid doc put me on Wellbutrin with no mood stabilizer, I never, ever experienced psychosis, or even a mania that couldn't be called anything but mania.  BPI "pure" manias sound really, really scary, and from the worst mania I had I can only imagine what it must be like to spin completely out of control that way.

I think it's just conjecture on their part, trying to figure out why the mechanisms are different.  And to me it makes sense.  When I got hypomanias I was always able to avoid outright danger.  Sure, I engaged in classic risk-taking behavior (drugs, sex, rock'n'roll), but they were sort of calculated risks.  Could always decide never to do a badly addictive drug again.  Could always run away from a scary man.  Could always pull myself together enough to have a warm dry place to sleep.  And really, really didn't want to admit my disease, so I was always able to explain it away.  I thought I was a little moody.

So it's more insidious for BPII because the consequences, while pretty obvious to us, are more subtle, more long-term, than for BPI?  I don't know.  That's a good topic for a series of Jamison-type books.  And all I can do right now is sleep, so hopefully someone else is out there writing.

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That is interesting...what I think is more interesting is that they claim people with BP2 are less likely to have consequences of their disorder. That isn't true! I totally disagree that BP2 is less serious. Maybe they aren't jumping from cars on the highway, but the suicide rate is the same for the subtypes of BP. Death sounds like a consequence to me! It sounds like there needs to be a real awareness in the psych camp about BP2 being a true, serious health condition. Maybe that would stop the denial/blame pattern in these people and help them understand the importance of treatment.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Look at it this way:

With all of the stigma remaining in society regarding mental illness, how many suicides related to BP do you believe are actually reported as such?

I mean, how many coroners, out of sympathy for the family, check "undetermined" rather than

"suicide" on a death certificate?

I don't believe that BP2 is any less serious a condition, but I would speculate that its worst effect - death by suicide - is statistically underreported.

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