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Hi Kaylani----I think you mean that you need the Medicaid.  Medicaid eligibility comes with SSI. Medicare, on the other hand, comes with SSDI on is based on how many "work credits" you have earned for your age.

It's a tricky situation---a doctor's note stating that you are "stable on medications" does not necessarily mean that you can earn SGA (substantial gainful activity) in the nation's economy.

On the other hand, the burden of proof is on the claimant that one's condition is severe enough to prevent SGA in the nation's economy.  Having a need for medication and a diagnosis is not enough to establish disability.  There are people with bipolar disorder who are, in fact, managed well enough on medications that there is some job that they could perform.

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If I were you, I would discuss the situation with your psychiatrist and ask is s/he has any ideas (clinics or doctors who provide low cost care) who would be willing to manage your psych meds. Perhaps you could get your meds free from the patient assistance programs.  You might want to explain your situation to Department of Social Services and see if they have any suggestions or if there are any programs available to help you.

Unfortunately, there is no universal health care in the great United States of America.

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Oh----another option----you could go to the Department of Rehabilitation to get services to help you become employed.  If your goal of going to school is to become employed, this could be part of your plan.

In SOME states/places, the DOR services may include "mental restoration,"  or diagnosis and treatment of physical or mental impairments if such treatment was necessary in order for you to become employed.

My counselors, however, never even discussed my disability with me nor cared if I had access to medication that would be needed in order for me to get employed.  But the DOR in your state might be different.

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My best friend was just denied SSD, he's signed up on here, but is afraid to step in and say hi to everyone.  So, I'm basically going to ask these questions for him.  I'm on SSD, thanks to all my loverly health probs.  Okay...I've already had my review, so I forget all the motions.  Help me out here.  He needs to know EVERYthing.  This links to help him with his appeal, what he should tell his Pdoc, his PCP, and his other doctors that are helping him.  He may have to get a lawyer, like I did.  What links should I tell him to go to.  Anything and everything will be greatly appreciated.

Info on him...there's no way he can go back to work.  He's mentally unable to and physically unable to.  That's about all I'm saying...I don't want to give away too much personal information about him.  I know I should post this somewhere else, but I figured someone on here might be able to direct me in the right direction.  I'll email him the links.

Thanks a bunch,

Elizabeth

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I'm sorry...I forgot to say...Good luck febrezeaddict!  Smart thing to ask your mom to help out with the interview.  I'm so sorry I forgot to add that in my post.  I'm not thinking clearly right now.  Bedtime meds are kicking in.

Elizabeth

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Elizabeth---check out the Crazy Meds webpage on how to apply for SSDI/SSI on the basis of a mental illness:

http://www.crazymeds.us/ssdi.html

This link has other links to check out, including a forum to discuss disability-related concerns.  This webpage also has 3 recommended books; in particular, I recommend the Nolo's Guide.

Sometimes, if neither a physical or mental impairment alone is enough to be disabling under SSA's rules, the claimant can still win on the basis of the combination of impairments.

Meanwhile, your friend should regularly visit his doctors, discuss that s/he is applying for SSDI/SSI.  Documentation should include how his activities of daily living are restricted, how his ability to concentrate and persevere at tasks are limited, and how his social functioning is limited.  Objective evidence is always preferred.

If your friend has been denied, I would suggest getting an attorney, who can help get a copy of the medical records, read through them and determine what additional medical evidence is needed to prove that s/he is disabled.

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