Jump to content
CrazyBoards.org




BPs - How many hours do you work?


How many hours do you work?  

161 members have voted

  1. 1. How many hours do you work?

    • Full time, work outside of home (40 hours or more)
      60
    • Part time, work outside of home (39 hours or less)
      30
    • Full time, work at home (40 hours or more)
      4
    • Part time, work at home (39 hours or less)
      4
    • Freelance, mostly full time
      1
    • Freelance, mostly part time
      4
    • Contract work, mostly full time
      0
    • Contract, mostly part time
      1
    • Stay at home parent or homemaker
      13
    • Unemployed
      36


Recommended Posts

I'm BPII and work a full time office job. I really struggle to work 8 hours or more a day. Most days I feel like I am going through the motions, faking it, and most of the time I'm miserable.

I am curious as to the amount of hours you BPs work. Please answer honestly. I tried to include all the categories I could think of, but if not, just reply in a post.

Any tips or feedback from you full-timers, as to how you get through the day would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks for voting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 64
  • Created
  • Last Reply

I hate shift work, especially restaurant and call center shift work which varies from day to day and week to week, covering all seven days of the week, but almost NEVER pays enough to actually PAY THE FRIGGING BILLS.  *hates work right now* 

I was quite happy working 30-35 hours, self-chosen within certain limits, as a professional housepainter.  I didn't have to deal with people, only things.  It was refreshing.  If it were still a possibility for me, I wouldn't hesitate to go back. 

When working full-time in a call center, I survived by variety.  I managed to make myself indispensable.  I got onto the one campaign with regular hours.  When they started to change that policy, I landed one of a handful of steady-schedule positions.  Within that position, I volunteered for everything.  A typical day included three hours on the phone, two hours of data entry, and three hours of either paperwork/employee evaluation or verifying recorded sales.  I still hated it, still struggled to get through the day, and still wouldn't have lasted much longer than I did (15 months), but I could sometimes watch fireworks from the office window in near-perfect peace, and this was good.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I hate shift work, especially restaurant and call center shift work which varies from day to day and week to week, covering all seven days of the week, but almost NEVER pays enough to actually PAY THE FRIGGING BILLS.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

i work in the restaurant business, i i really like it. this could be because i have been on vacation for a week, but it is always changing. it is fast paced and sometimes demanding, but i pretty much make my own schedule. for a while right afer my dx though i bounced in and out of working for 3 years. one of which being off entirely for a year. it is rough. now i work average of 35 hours a week. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a full-time teacher, but I get alotof holidays and summer off paid, yet I still managed to have a nervous breakdown at the end of the year that causedme to go on medical leave for the rest of the year.

I am scared to death of what is going to happen when I start working again. I hope i can make it. mel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I work as a personal care attendant for three almost as crazy as me special needs boys, in a group home for developmentally disabled adults (one who just threw a table at me yesterday, he's my favorite) and as a dance teacher.  During the school year I'm a full time student and work about 35 hours a week and in the summer I work about 55 hours a week.  I thrive on working.

I love my work, because every second of every day is different and I can pick and choose what I want to do and when I want to do it.  There are things that need to be done, of course, but it's so flexible, I'm always running around like a banshee, and it's incredibly physically and emotionally demanding.

Things get really difficult in the fall, because that's when I get inevitably depressed although the meds have made it somewhat more tolerable. (I can move)  Luckily, at all my jobs, there's always someone to help out, because they know that I helped them out when they needed it.  The mom with the three boys knows I'm bipolar and calls me and threatens me out of bed when she knows how depressed I am.  And I know she WILL come over to my house and dump a bucket of ice cold water over my head or drag my by my ankles into the car.  I love her. 

I luckily found my niche.  I think that people with disabilities like ours need to find theirs, because they're out there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Right now i work 40 hours a week as a database manager.  I don't deal with the public except as a back up receptionist, and I can handle that.  I'm not hot about my job, but it almost pays the bills.  I always like to do the temp thing if I can, because variety is the spice of life, and I really think if I can get two part time jobs instead of one full time job, man, that would be great.  But, I sludge through this for now, frustrated one day, bored the next.  It's tough, but as a single mom, what other choice do I have?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was working 40 hours a week in a toxic office (crazier-than-me evil boss and lots of talking behind backs---not just mine, everyone talked about everyone) AND carrying 8 credit hours at school last semester. I am literally still recovering. To the point now I can get out of my pajamas and into my new 15 hour a week job. I've applied at 3 places to try to get an additional 15 hours or so this summer, then drop one of the jobs once school starts. I think I'm at the point I can handle 30 hours. But 8 hours a day, in one place, in a row? Hell. Pure hell.  And I thought I was just lazy and had no work ethic...it makes sense now that at least part of it is the BP.  Can't sit still or stand people when manic, can't get out of bed when depressed. Not good for office work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I answered 40 hours a week, but that's a little bit of wishful thinking at the moment.  But I really believe that I'll get back to that.

I'm a lawyer, and was stuck at a dead-end in-house job for seven years.  Full time, but like someone said, mostly going through the motions.  18 months ago I got my current job in litigation and I've never been happier, lots of challenge, a good group to work with, clients who mostly behave themselves, and some flexibility because of the extra hours I work when I'm coming up to a hearing.  I've been so happy here that I accumulated three weeks of sick leave, because I no longer take sick days just for my misery.

That said, six or so weeks ago I started a medication change, from Depakote to Tegretol, and have been mostly tanking since then.  I took a full week off when I hit bottom with depression, and since then have worked sorta 3/4 time.  I finally said "uncle" and emailed my pdoc that I'm going to lose this job if something doesn't change, so now I'm starting Lamictal, which I pray will give me my life back.  I really, really don't want to lose my job.  I think Lamictal will work for me.  Fingers, toes, and eyes crossed...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm with gballsout, I couldn't click any of the responses because I'm still technically employed as a ft employee for an insurance co, but I've been out on a leave of absence with short term disability since February.  Coincedentally, though, while on my leave, the small office I worked in closed, so I have no job to return to once I'm ready to go back to work.  So, once my leave has expired (around the middle of Aug), I'll have to go on unemployment and file for the state insurance benefits as I don't think my case is strong enough for SSDI.  So if my meds aren't working well enough by Aug to get back into the workforce, I'm up shit creek.

*Sandy*

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Guest_mel1_*

Nars, I just wanted to let you know that lamictal worked wonders for me. It does take a long time to get to the ther. dose, which seems to be diff. for everone. Good luck! melissa

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I work 40 hours right now, and have for years,but its killing me-so when I move in Sept.,to the beach in Fla. I will be looking for  a 20 hour (about) job, eve if its not in nursing.  I work in the most toxic, unpleasant, non-understanding, nasty enviornment you can imagaine--with nurses!  I will be so glad to leave it you cannot imagine.  Problem is, I love the JOB, I just hate the enviornment.  The COMPANY is even outstanding, very ethical and honest and really a pleasure towork for--its those damn Stepford women who sit there in those little cubes day after day, and have no lives that I cannot take.

I would rather sell tee shirts at Alvin's Island, or ice cream cones on the beach than work in this kind of place again--I know the atmosphere has made my BP so much worse.  My darling husband wanted me not to work at all--just "play house and go to the beach and get well" but we can't quite afford that foranother couple of years, bless his heart.  But you can bet your ass I will NOT get back into that stress and nasty non-caring toxic ennvironment ever again.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I lost my last job as an FT help desk anaylst due to an uncontrolled mixed state. After that I went right to the hospital, and now am stable on Lamictal and Paxil. These drugs have given me my life back.

Tomorrow I'm supposed to hear if I was chosen for a position as an IT project manager. I really want this job.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chinacat, i will also be leaving behing a toxic working environment. Well, that's if I actually get a job, right now I don't have one, but I'm a teacher w/ summer's off and I get paychecks all summer. Good luck. I livein fla. too, mel1

P.S. Is anyone scared about going back to work? I am.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a full-time job which has been designed almost completely around me and my masters training ... I realise I'm very lucky, and they've been very tolerant of my MI status... BUT, as I sit here at home having been booked off by the doc for a month yet again.. I'm always waiting for them to realise I'm not worth it and kick me out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I accidentally entered a null vote last week.  I work full-time, salarie + commission.  My work is largely self-directed (within reason), so I can definitely have a couple of 25 hour weeks and a few 70+ hour weeks, but I guess it balances out.

Though I have a pretty nice office---it's about the size of an average bedroom, complete with a horseshoe style desk the size of a king-bed, air conditioning, a small refridgerator, microwave, coffee pot, 17" LCD Imac, T1 Internet access, etc I have been working primarily from a cramped desk in my bedroom at home for most of the last year.  I tend to somatize in a bad way, and often feel just awful physically, abdominal pain, nausea, the works so I'm usually of the "if I'm gonna work while putting up with those symptoms, I'm gonna do it from home. Did I mention that I get physically sick in the presense of my boss?  Also, I'm not alwyas comfortable driving on the meds. Thank God the company lets me work from home!  I do plan on working up to a full return to the office, though.  Working around screams from the kids and a cramped space seems kind of silly with the kinds of ammenities available to me a scant half-mile away.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm working full-time in an office setting - in financial services and sales (blech), and I'm a girl no less.  (Gender stereotypes are alive and thriving in Utah).  I truly despise this job and my boss, but ironically my coworkers have helped me get through it.  I can't imagine any other workplace where when I am crying at my desk nobody freaks - they just ask if I need a tissue.

The problem I find is that the manic cycles kind of create a level of expectation for you that you can't meet when depressed.  (It's like, well, LAST week you were able to make 15 sales, help 3 people with their broken computers, turn out 20 reports AND make the new marketing piece, why can't you do it THIS week?)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...