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How to turn dysphoric hypomania into euphoric hypomania


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I've read a study saying that temperament - whether people are naturally more positive or negative personality-wise - is a predictor of who has more of what kind.

I found euphoric hypomania to be totally invaluable because it got me diagnosed with bp, and then properly treated.

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I'd give you all the money in my bank account if you could give me that answer. It would have to include how to keep it that way.

I know how to get it there, antidepressants. But then it turns to rapid cycling and ends with a horrid mixed state. ;)

I find the right music at a high volume will produce a mild hypomanic feeling with me.

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i can temporarily make my dysphoric states into euphoric ones as dee said, with the right kind of music, but i need dancing thrown in there. i can get myself out of that negative funk and into my elevated state, but can't hold it there as the lights and sound die.

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I found euphoric hypomania to be totally invaluable because it got me diagnosed with bp, and then properly treated.

I have been struggling with bp for over 25 years and I'm being "properly treated," yet there are still times when I find myself either a little euphoric or dysphoric. It still breaks through. If I didn't have that little "kick in the pants" once in a while, life would not be worth living.

I don't have to take anti-depressants anymore. My bp has morphed into the challenge of staying non-manic. Therefore, it breaks thru. I have a normally negative personality, but when I get the euphoria, I become the life of the party - totally unlike me.

I have been experimenting with some rather strong sublingual Vitamin B complex and B12 from GNC. Sometimes I think that helps.

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I agree that music can tune the hypomanic state, not only from dysphoric to euphoric (or vice versa), but from hypomanic to less activated. In other words, the right music can settle hypomania.

I personally vouch for this:

http://www.allthingswell.com/sound_health.cfm

In Buddhist practice, one goal is calm abiding (Shamatha). This is the ability to hold your mind within a particular space for as long as you like. Both as in being able to sustain attention on a task and as in being able to "keep your head" and not let events take you off into some unnamed feeling. There are many obstacles to meditators in trying to meditate, and with calm abiding 2 primary ones are often called "excitement" -- an overactivity of the mind which will not allow settling and being attentive -- and "laxity" -- a slowing of the mind and withdrawing inwards that can lead to sleep or unawareness. I have found in my own practice that these states correspond well to hypomania and dysthymia (with more extreme mania and depression requiring more complex interventions).

In his advice for meditators, the Dalai Lama has this to say about how to counter excitement and laxity:

"That which interferes with the steadiness of the object of observation [as during a formal meditation on a mental or physical object] and causes it to fluctuate is excitement or, in a more general way, scattering. To stop that, withdraw your mind more strongly inside so that the intensity of the mode of apprehension begins to lower. To withdraw the mind, it helps to think about something that makes you more sober, a little sad. These thoughts can cause your heightened mode of apprehension of the object, the mind's being too tight, to lower or loosen somewhat whereby you are better able to stay on the object of observation.

"It is not sufficient just to have stability. It is necessary also to have clarity. That which prevents clarity is laxity, and what causes laxity is an over-withdrawal, excessive declination, of the mind. First of all, the mind becomes lax; this can lead to lethargy in which, losing the object of observation, you have as if fallen into darkness. This can lead even to sleep. When this occurs, it is necessary to raise or heighten the mode of apprehension. As a technique for that, think of something that you like, something that makes you joyous, or go to a high place or where there is a vast view. This technique causes the deflated mind to heighten in its mode of apprehension.

"It is necessary within your own experience to recognize when the mode of apprehension has become too excited or too lax and determine the best practice for lowering or heightening it."

For the Western scientific naysayers who deny all spiritual modes of transformation, it's worth noting that these diametrically opposed modes of thought -- mania/depression, positive/negative, euphoric/dysphoric, take your pick -- have been studied and found to correspond to overactivity of the left vs. right frontal lobes of the brain. Likewise people with negative personalities tend to show relatively greater activity in the right frontal cortex; those with positive personalities greater activity on the left. Interestingly, as neuroscientist John Ratey comments in his book A User's Guide to the Brain, the most densely developed left frontal cortex ever observed in clinical studies was that of a Tibetan Buddhist monk who had meditated for many years.

Overengaging the language centers on the left hemisphere of the brain, which are cross-linked to the right frontal cortex, can drift people towards negative thinking, whereas many (but not all) types of music activate the right hemisphere/left frontal cortex and so can increase positive thinking. Good choices are ethereal, trancy, smooth funky grooves, and expansive. Bad choices (for decreasing negative thought) are cerebral, mathematical, and overly dark music.

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