Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I'm just starting Parnate, and have seen several warnings about ordering food with gravy or sauces at restaurants. Why? It doesn't seem like they would contain the forbidden cheeses, soy sauce or other items, without being obvious (i.e. "cheese sauce", "Hawaiian gravy", etc.). I am looking at the updated lists, so I am puzzled. I really want to go out to eat and am not sure why they say to stick to "ordering simple".

Any advice or culinary expertise greatly appreciated. I know this is a rather obscure area.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ah, what is hidden in commercial processed foods that we would not knowingly use at home? ;)

There is no way to predict what gravy is made with in a restaurant. Checking my bottle of Gravy Master (and Bouquet is similar) I note that it has "Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein" and "Yeast Extracts".

Yeast is what causes fermentation, and hydrolyzed vegetable protein is usually yeast or yeast extracts that have been treated to obtain particulare flavors. These two Note the Monosodium Glutamate is closely associated with these culprits and is another byproduct of hydrolization, though I don't think it is strictly listed as forbidden.

A white gravy like with chicken fried steak might be less likely to have hydrolized vegetable protein in it, but I wouldn't bet your life on it. I think your safest choice is to choose fresh, simple dishes, skip the sauces and savor the natural flavors.

a.m.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What the hell is gravy master?

How hard is it to brown a little flower, make a roux and add milk?

I'm guessing that cooking the milk does it, so a white gravy that has milk in it would be more dangerous than a brown one.

FWIW, most people can eat most of the stuff on the prohibited lists without any problems. Search for some old posts of Fiona's on this topic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

VE, the point was that she was asking about dining out, not home cooking. I mentioned the Gravy Master and Bouquet as being representative of what nearly all restaurants use for their gravy bases.

a.m.

p.s. The only thing I use it in, is adding color to my beef stew. I guess the other alternative is to make my own caramel for coloring.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow. Thanks so much for your help, especially since you actually got up and did extra research. How nice. I had no idea hydrolyzed vegetable protein was a problem. Yikes. Makes me a bit worried about eating just about anything. (Sounds like the forbidden foods may have many other names that I won't recognize.) But I do understand your points and will order sans sauce and gravy. Navigating land mines.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...