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ok anyone know anything about guys with BPD? All u here about is females.

my cousin, who is male. is like my twin.

not in looks in personality. we share similar fears, values, beliefs and although we were raised obviously in similar ways with some of the same life lessons being instilled in us by our mothers who are sisters. our level of dysfunction is shared only between the two of us though and not my siblings or my other cousins. In other words we both share very common symptoms, partly due to the way we were raised but greatly i think to other causes as well.

anways that a little family history. just wondering anyone know, hear of guys with BPD? Does it even exsist for them.

BTW for those who dont know i am Bipolar and BPD plus i have an eating disorder, Yeah a nice combo of three.

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if it helps, i've never met a guy (in the hospital or support groups or pdoc's or wherever) who has said anything about having a bpd dx. i'm sure they're out there, but i just haven't come across any.

ophelia, are there different tell-tale traits of bpd in men, like there are different signs of ADD or ADHD in females than in males (so female go undetected)? maybe males just go undetected.

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ophelia, are there different tell-tale traits of bpd in men, like there are different signs of ADD or ADHD in females than in males (so female go undetected)? maybe males just go undetected.

this is some stuff I found:

"...Some studies report that men with BPD may be more likely to be diagnosed with substance use disorders, as well as paranoid, passive-aggressive, narcissistic, sadistic, and antisocial personality disorders (PDs). Additionally, women with BPD appear to be more likely to report histories of adult physical and sexual abuse and to meet diagnostic criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and eating disorders. The purpose of the present study was to further examine gender differences in BPD. Using baseline data from the Collaborative Longitudinal Personality Disorders Study (CLPS), men and women who met criteria for BPD were compared on current axis I and II disorders, BPD diagnostic criteria, childhood trauma histories, psychosocial functioning, temperament, and personality traits. Men with BPD were more likely to present with substance use disorders, and with schizotypal, narcissistic, and antisocial PDs, while women with BPD were more likely to present with PTSD, eating disorders, and the BPD criterion of identity disturbance. Generally speaking, women and men with BPD displayed more similarities than differences in clinical presentations. The differences that did emerge are consistent with those found in epidemiological studies of psychopathology and therefore do not appear unique to BPD...no difference was found in rates of major depressive disorder, a condition that is more prevalent in females. Thus, BPD pathology may be a prevailing characterization that can attenuate usual gender-based distinctions."
"Behavioral impulsivity in borderline personality disorder (BPD) is associated with indices of diminished central serotonergic function, independent of suicidal behavior, depression or alcohol use disorder. Many of these studies have been conducted among males in specialized settings. Studies of BPD females, who constitute the majority of BPD patients, are generally conducted in community settings and report inconsistent findings. We studied gender differences in behavioral impulsivity and the prolactin response to D,L-fenfluramine (FEN) in BPD subjects in a community setting... Male, but not female, BPD subjects had significantly diminished prolactin responses compared to controls. Impulsivity and aggression each predicted prolactin responses. A significant effect of BPD diagnosis on prolactin response was eliminated when impulsivity was co-varied. Impulsivity and aggression were inversely related to delta-prolactin and peak-prolactin responses among male but not female subjects. Gender differences in central serotonergic function may contribute to variations in impulsivity in BPD."

BPD Today: Borderline Personality Disorder Research

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Alot o' people become bipolar following a head injury. Now, I don't have any statistics here to back me up- just life experience. And most of ones who get head injured are males. Kinda turned around, huh? Okay so maybe the same number become head injured, brought on my borderline behavior.

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Alot o' people become bipolar following a head injury. Now, I don't have any statistics here to back me up- just life experience. And most of ones who get head injured are males. Kinda turned around, huh?

Science Direct:

Journal of Affective Disorders

Volume 76, Issues 1-3 , September 2003, Pages 79-83

Research report: Head injury as a risk factor for bipolar affective disorder

Abstract

Background: Case reports have associated head injury with psychoses including affective disorders, but little is known regarding head injury as a risk factor for the onset of bipolar affective disorder. Methods: The Danish Psychiatric Case Register and the Danish National Patients Register were linked together with the Danish Population Register, thus identifying 10 242 patients with bipolar affective disorder, and 102 420 matched controls. History regarding head injury was recorded from the National Patients Register data. Data were analysed using conditional logistic regression. Results: Bipolar affective disorder was associated with an increased risk of a history of head injury (IRR=1.55; 95% CI 1.36

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I guess I have a couple of things that I think in response to this.

One is that I think that men and women showing the same general symptom set often/sometimes/etc get diagnosed with different disorders, because certain behaviors are considered more appropriate coming from a man than a woman.

Some people argue, in fact, that BPD is more or less socially-created- that the symptoms are, in some part, caused by the socialization of women and, in some part, pathologized because they're happening to women. For instance, the idea that anger is less tolerated in women because we teach women not to get angry, etc.

I don't believe this in total. There is obviously a suffering about BPD that these kinds of theories never really address- I think stuff like that paragraph tends to minimize the fact that women with BPD truly do need help, individually, and not just some societal reform or something. Also, there are men who suffer from the same kinds of symptoms/disorder and while they, too, may have ended up feeling invalidated by their gender socialization (I don't doubt it- I imagine most men do, to some degree), it's obviously a different kind of socialization etc etc.

That said, and without trying to diagnose anyone, my male.... friend (?) Brian exhibits a lot of the symptoms of borderline to me and can talk to me about things and feelings that seem pretty borderline-centric, in a way that feels genuine. That's not a diagnosis, and I have no idea if he'd meet the diagnostic criteria. But it's been at least a useful reference to me for his behavior. In that... I feel like I unusually understand where he's coming from. Basically, I'm trying to say that I don't know if he's borderline, but he feels borderline(ish, at least) to me.

You can't diagnose anyone, and he can't diagnose himself. But if he's having similar kinds of problems, it would at least be worth it for him to see a therapist (if that's possible). That would be his best source of real information, you know?

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I don't believe this in total. There is obviously a suffering about BPD that these kinds of theories never really address- I think stuff like that paragraph tends to minimize the fact that women with BPD truly do need help, individually, and not just some societal reform or something. Also, there are men who suffer from the same kinds of symptoms/disorder and while they, too, may have ended up feeling invalidated by their gender socialization (I don't doubt it- I imagine most men do, to some degree), it's obviously a different kind of socialization etc etc.

there was just questioning about males and so i quickly tried to find stuff that had to do with it, ya know? it doesnt mean that i necessarily *agree* with what is said, but i was just looking for something documented sorta.... my brain is fried, nevermind.... sorry...

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  • 2 weeks later...

i have a male friend who was just DXed as BPD

----myself i am a guy and i am bipolar type 1 with psycosis moods .... so i go through the roller coster of being 20 people and then 1 !!!! .... also have borderline personality disorder so i am just a handle sometimes@

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  • 2 weeks later...

if it helps, i've never met a guy (in the hospital or support groups or pdoc's or wherever) who has said anything about having a bpd dx. i'm sure they're out there, but i just haven't come across any.

I not only have, I've dated one.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm a guy with BPD....so there are most likely a lot of male borderlines.

I feel men are more likely to be dx'd Bipolar or another type of personailty disorder.

Narsstic or Anti-social are common misses.

I also don't have anything realting to substance use or abuse.

As well I fit the implusivity of BPD not all that well shall we say.

Cutting yes however.

My main thing is implusive spending oddly enough.

Something femmine many would say.

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I have BPD, according to the MMPI and a hospital pdog no less (sarcastic snigger). I also have a host of other dxs.

I was seeing a really good private pdoc for a while and then had to go to the county system (a total clusterfuck, but another story). I have a great deal of chronic pain. My county pdoc said that becuase of the BPD diagnosis, I either maybe had a somatic disorder or I was looking for attention. He even said I don't need to see a regular doc. Asshole. Turns out I do in fact have a legit connecting tissue disorder.

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