Jump to content

is BPII "REAL" BP ?


Recommended Posts

I feel like if i say i have bp2 then i won't be taken seriously, but if i say good ol' plain (yeah right) bp then people will understand. i think even i am having trouble accepting and changing from more of an MDD dx.

How do you come to terms with the bp2 dx? ( although because i had a mixed state doesn't that go back to bp1?

i know none of these words should matter- they are jst words and don't really tell us much. i feel like i'm begining to take a dip in the depression pool and when that happens i always feel this need to "find" myself- either in a book or another person's experience or explanation. i feel like i just start to float and need some explanation or information or something to ground me.

My kitty is sick and old and i'm really scared and sad- i think that's what started it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

bpII is real. There's a holdover tendency to portray it as less severe than bpI, because we used to think that it was, but compared to bpI it is more chronic, harder to treat, and has identical suicide rates. There *is* a less severe version of bp which is called cyclothymia.

I have worried about the same thing - I was dx'd bpII then bp-nos, but for me the description of what is actually going on carries more information than "bipolar" does, since my ups are almost uniformly shitty in different ways, not like you'd expect from most portrayals of bp.

If you had hypomania+depression, that doesn't kick you to bpI - it has to be the DSM version of mixed state which means mania plus depression.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

of course BP2 is a real disorder. statistics between bp1 and bp2 sufferers show the same suicide rates in both populations.

there are debates on whether having a mixed episode puts you into 1 or if you can have them in 2. to me, as regular crazy woman, i'd look at the other characteistics. are you more depressed than anxious? are your depressions longer and deeper? are your manias hypomanias? what is the quality/feeling of your mixed state? i'd look for how often you get hypo verses depressed too, because bp1 people tend to not stick around in depression as much as the BP2 crowd.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it's in the DSM, I'd bet it was pretty real, and there are plenty of people on here to attest to that. Check out the Bipolar Disorder Survival guide, it'll help with the other parts of dealing with Bipolar Disorder, whichever you might be. If you think you're misdiagnosed you can talk it over with your pdoc. He or she could explain it in further detail and why the dx applies to you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of course it's real and to be prone to more depressive states rather than mania is certainly not less severe. Maybe it's worse.

Having been stuck in my longest depressive phase now and being BP1, I realize how hard it must be to be BP11 and have these depressive phases more often.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

.

are you more depressed than anxious? ]

What does that indicate when they seem to overlap so much?

but for me the description of what is actually going on carries more information than "bipolar" does, since my ups are almost uniformly shitty in different ways, not like you'd expect from most portrayals of bp.

Anyway, a lot of stuff I've read and been told by my pdoc says that no question this shit-hole is BP II, even though I question it every day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BP-II is definitely real. Trust me, I've been there. I've definitely never been floridly manic, but I have been visibly hypomanic, and moreover, I've suffered severe depression... all the past 13 years.

However, despite the similarity between BP I & II (namely that they both consist of "mood swings" of correspondingly similar lengths), somehow I intuitively feel that looking at biological and social underpinnings, they're two completely different disorders.

**I've thought that BP-II is more related to ADD (primarily inattentive, but also the ADHD types), atypical MDD, and Asperger.

It's also my opinion that BP-I is more related to the psychotic disorders (including MDD with psychosis).

The above doesn't make BP-I any more or less debilitating than BP-II (though in many respects, I'd rather be the BP-II that I am than be a BP-I).

I'm sure the two intersect somewhere biologically (just with almost all MI). Hell, it's well known that Asperger correlates with a familial history of schizophrenia, even though I just implied the two were unrelated.**

**The areas between asterisks above are just my wild-ass guessing and speculation. More research needs to be done on the nature of all of the above-mentioned mental disorders.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Herrfous has quite a curious and active mind, ahem, seeing connections and disconnections that no one else has documented. ;)

Dr. Phelps, a pdoc, has a fabulous site dedicated to BPII, but which is great background for anyone with bipolar disorder. http://www.psycheducation.org/

The present concept for bipolar, is that of a spectrum of symptoms. Not one with hard boundaries of essentially unrelated disorders. Dr. Phelps has a lengthy discussion of it, with good diagrams. Looking backwards, I can see my symptoms progression, and I don't recognize any dramatic shifts or breaks that correlate to the change in diagnosis.

a.m.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Herrfous has quite a curious and active mind, ahem, seeing connections and disconnections that no one else has documented. ;)

Dr. Phelps, a pdoc, has a fabulous site dedicated to BPII, but which is great background for anyone with bipolar disorder. http://www.psycheducation.org/

The present concept for bipolar, is that of a spectrum of symptoms. Not one with hard boundaries of essentially unrelated disorders. Dr. Phelps has a lengthy discussion of it, with good diagrams. Looking backwards, I can see my symptoms progression, and I don't recognize any dramatic shifts or breaks that correlate to the change in diagnosis.

a.m.

"Connections and disconnections" isn't exactly the term you were looking for; it's more just a messy goo of information splattered together and moving about. Like an amoeba.

Interesting that you "converted" (gradually) from BPII to BPI (which would be evidence against my hypothesis). In any event, I'm sure that's entirely possible in my little fous-logic view, since I don't consider BPII and BPI opposites of each other.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

bpII is real. There's a holdover tendency to portray it as less severe than bpI, because we used to think that it was, but compared to bpI it is more chronic, harder to treat, and has identical suicide rates.

I'd be interested to know what you are basing that on?

Btw, the DSM says nothing about BPIIs spending more time in depression than BPIs, does it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

bpII is real. There's a holdover tendency to portray it as less severe than bpI, because we used to think that it was, but compared to bpI it is more chronic, harder to treat, and has identical suicide rates.

I'd be interested to know what you are basing that on?

Btw, the DSM says nothing about BPIIs spending more time in depression than BPIs, does it?

The DSM doesn't know that much about BPIIs anyways. It just attempts to define us. ;)

[looking at your sig: 4mg klonopin? liver of steel, anybody?]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

bpII is real. There's a holdover tendency to portray it as less severe than bpI, because we used to think that it was, but compared to bpI it is more chronic, harder to treat, and has identical suicide rates.

I'd be interested to know what you are basing that on?

Btw, the DSM says nothing about BPIIs spending more time in depression than BPIs, does it?

The DSM doesn't know that much about BPIIs anyways. It just attempts to define us. ;)

[looking at your sig: 4mg klonopin? liver of steel, anybody?]

I'm not saying the DSM is almighty. I hope as more research is done it will have more information about BPII. I don't see the DSM as an exact scientific book, but it's what we have for now and official diagnoses have to be defined by it.

I was just curious about the information regarding BPII being more chronic. I realize both flavours suck, but I also believe mania can be more harmful than hypomania. As for which type spends more time in depression, I don't think that can be said as a general statement, it's all about the individual.

But to clarify: Yes, I do believe BPII is as real as BPI.

And yes, I have a high tolerance. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

However, despite the similarity between BP I & II (namely that they both consist of "mood swings" of correspondingly similar lengths), somehow I intuitively feel that looking at biological and social underpinnings, they're two completely different disorders.

**I've thought that BP-II is more related to ADD (primarily inattentive, but also the ADHD types), atypical MDD, and Asperger.

It's also my opinion that BP-I is more related to the psychotic disorders (including MDD with psychosis)...

My issue when a lot of people start to make comparisons between BPI and BPII is how the DSM and hypomania vs mania come into play.

You be mighty screwed up and still be technically hypomanic. You can do a lot of totally twisted things but have it not disrupt your life, exactly. You could still carry on the essential things- important relationships remain intact because you're charming, you have just enough sense to not screw yourself financially-you still have money for rent food and whatnot, you are still showing up at work or still complete your responsibilities for whatever reason.

But essentially, you [this imaginary general you]could be very Not Right.

Interesting that you "converted" (gradually) from BPII to BPI (which would be evidence against my hypothesis). In any event, I'm sure that's entirely possible in my little fous-logic view, since I don't consider BPII and BPI opposites of each other.

This is really not unheard of and I am a little surprised that you are surprised. For some people, it is a matter of proper diagnosis. For others, it is more that it is a matter of time before The Big One. And sometimes there is a progression of illness- though I still think that happens because of incorrect diagnosis in a way- treatment not right for the symptoms. I think as a physiological illness they are different, but it doesn't mean they are completely unrelated. If they were to be viewed as a syndrome, they are nearly identical, just a matter of severity.

One of the things that does encourage the idea of a distinct difference, at least in terms of brain injury/damage/activity/whateverthehell is obviously how each sub group might typically be more responsive to certain meds.

Also that certain meds have given a lot of those who are dx'd BPI problems and not those dx'd BPII and the other way around as well. I think I went on a little tangent about that somewhere and probably made about the same amount of sense as I am making here.

Anyway. Those with bipolar can all present so differently that I and II don't really work.

Descriptive definitions [more than two] might.

I sort of veared away-ish. sorry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As for which type spends more time in depression, I don't think that can be said as a general statement, it's all about the individual.

Although some people will be atypical for bpI and bpII, this can and has been said as a general statement, based on studies of large numbers of people.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

but I also believe mania can be more harmful than hypomania

and then there's some kind of uni-polar Mania, kicked of by an agitated depression and every episode thereafter is full blown mania with psychosis and no depressions in between. Harmful? Terrifyingly so. And yet the dx is Bipolar Disorder with Schizoaffective features. Apparently, there needs to be no depressions to be classified as Bipolar.

getting off topic here

I guess I'd rather be depressed, anxious, pissed-off, distracted, obsessive, scared to answer the phone or go out by myself, and be dx BP II- than zooming around the Stratisphere because the answers must be there and someone is saying to drive off the cliff to see what would happen. And not regretting a moment of it.

oops- off topic again

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was going to try and dig up some research articles on the differences found in BP-II and BP-I depressive states...

but for now I'm just back to that "batshit-NOS" paradigm.

I might come back later with more useful information, however.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

but I also believe mania can be more harmful than hypomania

and then there's some kind of uni-polar Mania, kicked of by an agitated depression and every episode thereafter is full blown mania with psychosis and no depressions in between. Harmful? Terrifyingly so. And yet the dx is Bipolar Disorder with Schizoaffective features. Apparently, there needs to be no depressions to be classified as Bipolar.

getting off topic here

I guess I'd rather be depressed, anxious, pissed-off, distracted, obsessive, scared to answer the phone or go out by myself, and be dx BP II- than zooming around the Stratisphere because the answers must be there and someone is saying to drive off the cliff to see what would happen. And not regretting a moment of it.

oops- off topic again

Yeah, bpI currently can be diagnosed with no depression, only mania. It doesn't have to all be mixed states then manias with psychosis, though - it could lack mixed states, or not be psychotic. bpII requires depression in addition to hypomania, though. (I guess because if you don't have a full depression, but have hypomanias, it counts as cyclothymia instead of bp?)

I think the definition of which states of fuckedupness are the least worse probably varies by person...I've heard a lot of people here say that they find mixed states the worst, though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting that you "converted" (gradually) from BPII to BPI (which would be evidence against my hypothesis). In any event, I'm sure that's entirely possible in my little fous-logic view, since I don't consider BPII and BPI opposites of each other.

This is really not unheard of and I am a little surprised that you are surprised. For some people, it is a matter of proper diagnosis. For others, it is more that it is a matter of time before The Big One.

Interesting. My own history sort of bears this out, in that my depressions consistently hit the same low point of suicidal ideation, but my (hypo)manias got wilder and wilder. Officially, I'm BPII, but I suspect if my shrink had asked the right questions, I'd be BPI. The big one certainly came along, and that's how I ended up at the pdoc's. At the time, I was in enough of an SSRI screwed up mess that he probably didn't dig deep enough into my history. Shit, I was being followed by the CIA and trying to sneak drugs into the family's meals fer chrissakes, but he never managed to get that deep into my past.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I recieved my diagnosis I was surprised that it was BP 1 as at the time I thought that you had to experiece psychotic/delusional/hallucinatory stuff which I never have. I realise this is not true and it would seem that full blown mania can be with or without this.

I remember also just before diagnosis (when I was so screwed up with the inability to relax, sleep or stop my racing mind that I called The Samaritans) Loon told me that what I was describing sounded like BP 1 symptoms.

I would say that it largely depends on your ability to cope and to function normally. Over the last year I have spend more time not being able to function normally. In fact, looking back on it. BP has ruined a large portion of my university education and experience: Mania got me into trouble, depression crippled me and my studying, and the mixed state made me so confused I packed up and went back home. I'd say it depends on how badly it affects your life. Of course I'm not suggesting that BP 2 doesn't do this, just that BP 1 is probably worse. I think I was BP 2 for most of my life, which at times was very difficult indeed. I think it got "upgraded" to BP 1 after I had my year's worth of cancer treatment as this caused a lot of problems, including PTSD and is in part responsible for my ED. Certainly since having cancer my mood swings have been worse and my ability to cope has diminished. Obviously this is only my story - others will have completely different experiences from me. Some of you will no doubt know that you have always been Bipolar whether type 1 or 2.

So in answer to your question - yes, of course BP 2 is real - very real indeed, but it has taken a long time, and a diagnosis of BP 1, for me to realise how Bipolar disorder itself has affected my life right from the start.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For me, and it seems lots of people with me, it started out with depressions and hypomania. The depressions got deeper and the hypomanias eventually developed into mania.

So initially I had a BPII diagnosis which was later changed to "other specified bipolar disorder" according to ICD-10, though the "other specified" refers to rapid cycling. If I was to be put on a BPII/BPI scale, it would be BPI, according to my pdoc. But she considers rapid cycling as something in its own. It's complicated.

Well, to conclude, I know hypomania and I know mania. Mania IS worse. But I also know BPII is real, it can mess you up and it needs treatment. Maybe BPIIs do spend more time in depression, I don't know. I just know I do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

when i was DXed, there wasn't a BP2. you were just BP. so when i went to get drug treatment, my psychiatrist had to do some digging.

he explained it to me this way- he said that bp1 people tend to hit certain lows and huge highs, but are a bit more rapid in their cycling generally and tend to be spikey.

he said that bp2 people tend to have longer lasting, "deeper" depressions, but their highs aren't as frequent (usually) and the pattern isn't as erratic.

that was his opinion anyway. i don't know if it is true across the board or not, that was just what he had to say to me.

and i said 'ok, i spike around all the time, high and low and everywhere else, so i'm bp1' and he said 'yeah', so it was official.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Of course bp 2 is 'real', it may not be the classic form of the illness, but that doesn't stop it being real.

Most people accept it's not as severe - as bp 1 often includes delusions / halucinations and often total loss of reality whilst manic. ;) And i'll add to what someone else said..Mania IS a hell of a lot worse than hypomania, and often very terrifying.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Um.

They both suck mega ass.

Pretty much.

Getting into a "this sucks more than that" discussion isn't really practical given all the factors. But pretty much if it messes with your life, it's a shitty thing and I would say equally so if you are talking about impact.

Or pain.

Or anything.

MI in general fucks with you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

of course bp II is real. but in some sense everyone is a little bipolar. bp II is less severe than bp I, but involves some serious problems with mood regulation beyond that of which everyone has a little of. i think both MDD and bp II can be severe illnesses. sometimes its difficult to differentiate the two, other times it is clear that its bipolar and not MDD. thats because hypomania is difficult to diagnose except when it is very obvious. if its MDD you have, then the times u feel normal might seem a little "high" but its not hypomania, just relief from the normal depressed state. for a pdoc who normally sees you depressed, they might think it is hypomania.

for practical treatment purposes, it makes more sense to see how crazy the patient is (heh heh) and try to choose medication before making a final diagnosis. for example, MDD patients could respond to low doses of lamictal when antidepressants fail and that doesnt necessarily make them bipolar.

also some bipolar patients can do well with just an antidepressant and a very weak mood stabilizer (and strong anti-anxiety) benzo such as clonazepam. these are not rules but my personal experience has been that my bipolar NOS responds well to this type of medication combo. on the other hand, i never got good responses from short-acting benzos, so id think that clonazepam (klonopin) and diazepam (valium) would be best choices for very mild bipolar in preventing occasional breakthrough hypomania.

the DSM is a statistical manual, statistical because there is no firm scientific basis for a lot of the different disorders, just clusters of symptoms seem to occur together frequently and thats where you get the definitions of things like bp II. personally i think there should be more initial diagnoses of mood disorder NOS and bipolar NOS before coming to a final diagnosis. what looks like MDD or bp II could possibly be dysthymia as well. dysthymia is kind of underrated as far as MI goes, but it can be very severe and often ends in suicide.

all in all, i think all medications are fair game to try for symptoms that are appropriate to that medication, so questions about bp II being real bipolar are not really that important in my opinion. as far as the law is concerned, i think bp II in new jersey is considered as severe as bp I.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

*** CAUTION -- NON-ADMIN OPINION BELOW ***

I don't believe in playing the "my misery is worse than your misery" game.

That's bullshit.

And if that hurts everyones feelings but mine, fuck it.

It's like comparing Walnuts to Grapenuts. It can't be done.

Misery is misery.

It sucks.

It really is that simple.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks - you 're right- a comparison doesn't really make any sense as they all suck.

i guess what i've been looking for is an answer to why some people in my life think i'm just fine now- but the bp2 seemed to get their attention more which i liked. i guess it also made it all more "chemical" and so alleviated (mom's) guilt.

I don't know- i never feel like i "fit"- it would be nice to be and feel a clear part of some group (or dx), so that i could better understand what's happening to me and have people who could understand and help. it's like i'm not sure i really "deserve" to post on BP- but it seems to get more traffic than depresssion.

honestly- i feel really confused- who the heck is this person, what's keeping her from living a normal life and why does it seem so easy for others to ignore. blah blah blah.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Researchers do make comparisons of bpI and bpII on average.

There's some consensus, not a whole lot. bpII has less damage from ups than bpI, but a much higher rate of depression and fewer days spent normal between episodes (and possibly more cycling), which some researchers argue made them equivalently damaging. Other people say bpI is more severe.

None of this has much to do with whether someone's bp is worse than someone else's. Information about that can better be had by looking at their individual characteristics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BPs tend to be all wrapped in themselves. That's why it gets so much traffic.

hee hee.

"It's all about me, baby."

[please keep in mind, I'm trying to be humorous]

I have a friend that is just learning about his BPII and he's having a hard time with it too. He'd much rather be MDD. It's strange. At least to me. But he's learning to take some control of his life by accepting that he's got a chronic disease that requires meds, therapy, etc...

He's having to learn that things are going to be different and he's having to accept that. And that's his stumbling block.

And I don't know where this post was going. Sorry. I blame the cold meds.

I need a nap.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Horseshit, all of it! What's the point of an "I'm more fucked up than you" contest? My understanding was that BP I supposedly has fun, funky manias where us second class citzens have to make do with hypomania. But screw you! You only get to cyle once a year or so, where we can be ultra rapid and have this shit every few days.

Crapola, boys and girls. It's a fuckin' spectrum disorder. Biology has an inconvenient way of not allowing itself to be neatly pigeonholed.

So I'm BP II, but that's becasue a) I rapid cycle, and b) my shrink never got to ask me about the delusions or being followed by the freakin' CIA. Happy to swap lives for a couple of months with any asshole who "doesn't believe BPI II exists." All IMHO, of course...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I certainly think it exists!

I wish there was a more consistent DX for both though. I read one thing and I think I'm BP2, I read another and I think I'm BP1.

However, I've been Dxed as type 1 by my pdoc so I should probably go along with that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Horseshit, all of it! What's the point of an "I'm more fucked up than you" contest? My understanding was that BP I supposedly has fun, funky manias where us second class citzens have to make do with hypomania. But screw you! You only get to cyle once a year or so, where we can be ultra rapid and have this shit every few days.

I didn't know we were doing that. I certainly wouldn't want to - I think it's insensitive.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Horseshit, all of it! What's the point of an "I'm more fucked up than you" contest? My understanding was that BP I supposedly has fun, funky manias where us second class citzens have to make do with hypomania. But screw you! You only get to cyle once a year or so, where we can be ultra rapid and have this shit every few days.

I didn't know we were doing that. I certainly wouldn't want to - I think it's insensitive.

A pissing contest between the mentally ill to see who is iller? That may be amusing for a bit... Until the poo starts being flung...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A pissing contest between the mentally ill to see who is iller? That may be amusing for a bit... Until the poo starts being flung...

<TMI>

I've got gastric motility issues, so I'll projectile vomit.

</TMI>

No really, I'm pretty used to doing that by now. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Horseshit, all of it! What's the point of an "I'm more fucked up than you" contest? My understanding was that BP I supposedly has fun, funky manias where us second class citzens have to make do with hypomania. But screw you! You only get to cyle once a year or so, where we can be ultra rapid and have this shit every few days.

I didn't know we were doing that. I certainly wouldn't want to - I think it's insensitive.

A pissing contest between the mentally ill to see who is iller? That may be amusing for a bit... Until the poo starts being flung...

As long as all parties involved are consenting adults and keep the poo flinging inside their own homes I don't see anything wrong with it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

I believe there are spectrum disorders.

I have trouble accepting it for myself because of labels being changed back and forth between bumbling doctors.

First bumbling docs said Bipolar II. Then did not help me get proper treatment. The next doc was a clinical psych who said I was labeled BP because they wanted to punish me as a woman.

And because she was connected to the hospital whenever I told the docs there, I thought I had bipolar, they said no.

I began suffering from dysthymia with racing thoughts and panic, then deeper depressions with chronic suicidal ideation.

Eventually I headed to a new psych and laid it all out in plain english, and without bias from any of my hospital records they said bipolar spectrum, type II.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Um, yeah, no one in the world can tell me my lil' ol' #2 version of BP is 'milder' or 'less severe' than BP1.

I think the consensus that one is somehow 'worse' than the other results when one bases their measurements on only the most extreme states, ignoring certain symptoms that complete the full picture. For example- it's fuckin' scary watching someone experience a full-blown psychotic state; hearing voices, talking to people who aren't there, perhaps they're catatonic or are outwardly violent... whereas someone who's "just" cutting themselves, or "just" abusing illicit drugs to get them through their days, or anyone else who's figured out how to hide or minimize any external signs... well, we're generally a lot less scary to deal with (with exception to anyone on a PCP high).

Fair enough.

But it's kinda like saying that schizophrenia is worse than Alzheimers. My grandma has Alzheimers, and not only does she forget who people are sometimes, but the disease will kill her eventually. So, uh, which one is 'worse' again? It's a completely subjective opinion.

Personally, i'd rather be bipolar than be confined to a wheelchair, but I'm sure there are a lot of people out there- in and out of wheelchairs- that would passionately disagree with me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

really to me the only difference is the medications.. i was labeled BP2 for awhile, but the meds never seemed to help.. once i finally got DX'd as BP1 changing the meds made a world of difference.. otherwise they all exsist, suck and we deal with it. i think part of it is the moments where we wonder if we really ARE mentally ill in the first place.. thats when you really should keep a journal of some kind so that you can re-read and be reminded its real.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yeah. I question that all the time, but when I look at the stuff I wrote going back 30-40 yrs, it's pretty clear. Only then I was not "mentally ill", I was ECCENTRIC and proud of it. Ppl kept telling me I was like a wild horse that needed to be tamed, and that was a big compliment to me. (they never saw the melancholy and despair- that went into the journals).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest kimbriel

I believe there are spectrum disorders.

I have trouble accepting it for myself because of labels being changed back and forth between bumbling doctors.

First bumbling docs said Bipolar II. Then did not help me get proper treatment. The next doc was a clinical psych who said I was labeled BP because they wanted to punish me as a woman.

And because she was connected to the hospital whenever I told the docs there, I thought I had bipolar, they said no.

I began suffering from dysthymia with racing thoughts and panic, then deeper depressions with chronic suicidal ideation.

Eventually I headed to a new psych and laid it all out in plain english, and without bias from any of my hospital records they said bipolar spectrum, type II.

yeah, like me. I have a mild version of Cerebral Palsy (I walk) and a mild version of Bipolar (only 2 episodes in my 30 years, on no meds, both episodes precipitated by large amounts of benadryl...) quite frankly when I look at what people with severe mental illness go through, I'll take my physical disability any day of the week...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest kimbriel

In regards as to which is worse, I think it all depends on the person. I'm BP I, but my friends with BP II, while they don't have the horrible manias I experienced, go through loooooong bouts of very deep depression which I've never experienced before. I've actually never had a clinical episode of depression.

Playing "which is real" or "which is worse" is kinda futile. The whole thing sucks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not bipolar, but curious (hope that's okay)...

What's the difference between manic-depression and bipolar? I've been told there is no difference, that there is a difference but everyone says something different about what that difference is, and on this topic people are referring to them as different things.

It is stupid to trivialize someone else's struggles just because you're struggling, I agree with that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Vapourware

"Manic depression" was the old term for bipolar. It's used colloquially but in a clinical setting, it's been superseded by bipolar 1/bipolar 2/cyclothymia/BP-NOS/BP-3 etc.

"Bipolar" is a spectrum disorder and bipolar 1, bipolar 2, bipolar-NOS, bipolar 3 and cyclothymia is a tag to identify where a person sits on the spectrum.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Going back to the question about Bipolar II:

I think there is an inherent problem in talking about the severity of mental illnesses.

To begin with, I think all mental illnesses can come in more or less serious forms. My symptoms may be worse, or better, than someone else with Bipolar II- the same as happens with most other illnesses. Because of this, someone who "only" has severe depression may be in a far worse state than someone with bipolar disorder (and they may get less treatment because they are seen as having a less serious ilness).

I think that the bigger problem is that there is no way to objectively compare how bad a person feels because of a mental illness. I'm not sure it makes sense to ask which is worse- they all suck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, there's really no way of objectively gauging (how the hell do you spell that...) what's "worse".

For example, most people I know would be freaked RIGHT out if they were to start experiencing "visual disturbances" of any kind... however, weird ass shit like that just doesn't get me as worked up as quickly... like, if I start seeing shadows that aren't there I don't freak out, I just note that there are no shadows, even though I see shadows- end of story. Same scenario might really scare someone else and send them running to their doctor.

There are people out there living with schizophrenia that just aren't bothered by it, just as there are people out there with unipolar depression who end up killing themselves because of the pain.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...