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Course You Hated!


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i hated german phonetics. it was just our professor. i was doing a speaking test in her office with her when a tornado touched down in a town 3 miles from our school, and everyone was supposed to be in the safe place. everyone except us, that is. i suggested that we go to the safe place and she said "if it is our time, it is our time, let's do the test" and kept testing me! (our tests were one-on-one speaking tests with our professors, all in german, of course).

i also hated statistics. the first time i took it, i failed. i never got below a B- in college except for that. so when i retook stats and got a B, it erased my F. i've just never gotten stats. you have to use it frequently in econ (my college major) and it still never made sense.

Music 101- i thought this would be a cake-walk because i'd been in band since 4th grade and played 3 instruments. not so easy. the professor expected us to be able to listen to a note she played on the piano, and tell her exactly what one it was, and you couldn't be wrong. if it was a B you couldn't say B#. then she decided to play songs on the piano, and we had to write out, by hand, exactly the music she was playing. so we had to have the whole thing drawn out, perfectly, with all the notes being perfect. if one was wrong, they were all wrong.

i ended up withdrawing from this class. i failed every quiz and test i took. it got to the point where i'd just write my own songs on the tests and turn those in. i gave up

Poetry- i made the huge mistake of deciding that i wanted to explore my creative writing side with some poetry. wrong. this prof was the biggest pervert on the planet. the way my school was devised was that our semesters were 15 weeks long, but broken into a 12-week session and a 3-week session. the 3-week was for 1 intensive course (i hated this system). this poetry was in that 3-week. every day of class equalled a week in real life. he spent maybe an hour or so on all the chapters in the book until we got to intimate/sexual poetry, and we had to spend 3 hours on that, and write and share our sexual poetry. and read it in class. i'm NOT KIDDING. i claimed to be a virgin and said that i had no intimate poetry to share, so i talked about kissing (lol). i was living with my boyfriend so this was a huge joke.

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high school trig. i flunked it. the teacher on the first day of class proudly announced, i always fail at least ten percent of my students. anyway, we had a german exchange student and i was the first person able to "translate" her math into our version of writing it out. and the teacher said "i knew you were failing on purpose"... what the hell???

anything geometry. i adore algebra, but geometry is the death of me.

english classes have all been dull. i don't know why. i study it on my own and am fascinated! but the teachers make it sooo dry. i still can't diagram a sentence.

abifae

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I had a beginning econ professor that I swear must have been paid by Nike or something, because he took us through all these slide tours of Nike factories in Cambodia or somewhere to prove to us how "happy" they were. I'm not even kidding. Haha.

It actually... it was a huge lecture and I sat in an inconspicuous spot with a couple of friends, so it wasn't that bad, situationally. The professor was insane. We made fun of him the entire time. He said something nasty about his wife one day, but I can't remember what it was now. Man.

The worst class I ever took I ended up withdrawing from. It was a journalism class meant pretty much solely to weed people out of the journalism school, and it basically worked for me. Haha. The class was called "Information Gathering," but everyone called it "Info Hell." Seriously, the last day of class you got a button that said "I survived Info Hell." I didn't get the button because I withdrew. Anyway, basically, you had to pick some boring awful congressional act (almost everything exciting or controversial was banned- I had about the most "exciting" topic, and mine was the telecommunications act of 1996), have 40 sources (which were divided between magazines, books, journal articles, interviews, etc, a certain way). You write a 2 page annotation on each source. Then you had to write a 20 page paper on the issue as a whole. The idea was to have 100 pages of research on this crap by the end of the term (which was only 10 weeks long). It was definitely do-able.... most people passed. But it was really tedious and time-consuming and I had this huge crush on this depressed insomniac who lived a couple blocks away from me and I spent all night talking to him instead of sleeping or doing homework.

I had pretty uniformly mediocre classes. Hahaha. I had a couple of great ones and a couple that were pretty shitty... but mostly, they were "eh."

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Sociology. I changed degrees entirely because I hated it so much (was studying social work and there were 2 years of compulsory sociology courses. <shudder>)

Also Moral and Political Philosophy, but that probably had more to do with the lecturer being an arrogant PhD student with an attitude problem.

High school geometry.

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The third degree I started (finished the first two) sucked in general. I withdrew from iit but withdrew late in the semester so it counted as fails, I'm hoping if I ever recover enough to study again that it won't effect my record too badly.

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definitely the web development course I took in 12th grade (ca. 1999).

not only did I know more about HTML than the instructor

she also once was telling us to set up an array of links for an alphabetical listing.

"There's 25 letters in the alphabet, right?"

that's when this Aspie rolled his eyes and got a subsequent detention.

strangely, I helped out the same teacher making a lesson plan during said detention.

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Got a million of 'em.

Grammar for Comp Teachers: This was back when I thought I would try to go to grad school in English. Unfortunately, all the English comp courses at our university were taught according to one ancient professor in the department who had created his own system of English grammar with its own terms. It was so bad that no school would accept the university's English comp courses for transfer credit. I wasn't motivated that semester anyway, but the material was so hard and so unlike anything I was used to that I did poorly--the instructor had pity on me and gave me a D.

Fiction--Just really a dull/dry class. I was interested in it initially because it was a chance to cover more contemporary work, something that we didn't do much of in my creative writing department. But the professor just took the life out of the work and gave these annoying quizzes that had questions regarding very minor details of the work, like what color dress was so-and-so wearing. I dropped midway through. It was one of those classes that made me realize I was probably in the wrong major. Unfortunately, I was approaching senior year.

Emily Dickinson seminar: This was a summer course at a smaller university. My "regular" university had a pretty strong English program. This school didn't, and this course really showed me the difference. This was like a high school course, but it was difficult when I would try and ask questions that seemed like reasonable questions to ask in an upper level English class, I would be shot down by the prof. How this guy got his doctorate I'll never know...probably from the same university he was teaching at. He and the other students just kept trying to "solve" the poems as if they were riddles or something, trying to figure out "what she meant." Waste of my time.

Graduate school:

Statistics: Not because it's hard necessarily...the instructor was really good about reassuring us. But she would go into way too much detail and move much too quickly--we would regularly have tests and assignments over material that we had covered in class 3-4 weeks ago and that she had already moved past. It seemed that about halfway through we moved way beyond the realm of what MBA and graduate accounting students would ever encounter and more into the realm of social science academic study.

I would have much preferred that she had gone more slowly and stuck to what was relevant to our field.

Cost Accounting/Intermediate Accounting: Taught by this guy who told the same stories repeatedly about his life, movies he'd seen, just about everything except the course subject matter. Never wrote on the board, never had any conceptual problems on exams [just rehashing of the homework problems,] never really taught the course. He was let go after one year, with the decision being made after his first semester. The intermediate course in particular is probably most important undergraduate course in all of accounting. I'm considering auditing the class next semester even though I got an A when I took it last spring, just to hopefully learn something that I will need to know later. His cost accounting class I don't think hurt me as badly, since I am doing well enough in my graduate cost accounting class.

Principles of Operations Management: The guy was so enamored of his web-based lectures that the class hardly met. This was nice to only have class a couple of times a month, but I was paying for a whole semester.

Another one who had very little qualitative information in the class, just a bunch of problems. The annoying part was that just about everything in his class I've since had covered in several other classes, so I'm wondering why we even needed to take the class at all.

Professional and Legal Research: Unorganized mess of a course. The syllabus is not really followed, we have no idea what it is we need to be doing. She has us do these really specialized legal style essays that aren't really the kind of writing one needs to be doing in business. I think it might be useful for undergrads taking business law to learn to do this to see if any of them might want to try law school, but we're already in a graduate program! It's basically a review for a portion of the CPA exam, so it might as well be taught like one. Also, the prof has no accounting background. She is also very rude to students. I've had rude professors before, and can handle it sometimes...one of my best professors so far is very rude and tough on students, but it's an attempt to weed out the ones who aren't serious. But this prof is just a rhymes-with-witch.

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anything math related. In highschool, I did the advanced stream of math for some reason, and came close to failing every year (ie 52, 58, etc) I actually went from advanced grade 12 to academic in my third year, because my mark was so poor I'd never get into university.

And then when I did get in university, I failed intro calculus twice. The third time it was almost down to failing, or having sex with my teacher. Thankfully, I did well, and I have little to no math left to study.

Currently, the course I hate is the 'cognitive neuroscience of vision.' It's a required class for my degree (psychology), and it's awful. The professors are so old I'm afraid they'll die mid-lecture, and the material is confusing as all hell. I need to get a 90 on my final exam, or I'll have to do it over again, which might very well kill me.

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Ok I'll play. I really really hated second year university organic chemistry. The whole course was based on drawing little chemical structures and memorising long complicated chemical reactions and being able to "draw" these reactions using the chemical structures.

In the end I just rote learned the ones we had to know by writing them out as many times as I could until I could remember it. Needless to say I didn't carry on in this subject.

I also hated clinical pharmacology (third year). We had to learn the names of HUNDREDS of drugs (many long and sometimes unpronouncable weird names), the basics of how they worked, and examples of what diseases it was prescribed for.

On the other hand, I loved maths/stats (despite not taking them past first year uni level, due to compulsory subjects I had to take for the rest of this degree and my second degree).

I guess I hate rote learning. I can only remember things if they are logical/mathematical or just make sense. Genetics at third year wasn't much fun either.

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I didn't like my foreign language classes either--took 2 years of German, but I think they were all taught about the same way so it really wouldn't have mattered which language I took. I don't like how most schools teach language--just dumb homework problems and then a half-assed attempt at requiring people to speak it in class. The only people who really seem to learn anything are the few percent who go on to major or minor in the language, so it seems like the vast majority of students aren't very well served by it. I imagine some schools do a better job of teaching it, but my experience was that it was a lot of useless jumping through hoops.

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Interpersonal communications 101 and 102. Torture. I dislike communicating period (except for here at crazyboards). The "interpersonal process recordings" done during placement weren't problematic because I like working with people, but doing artificial student interactions in front of the professor while being videotaped is really anxiety provoking for me. keeping a personal journal for class YUCK. Then being graded for assertiveness skills on top. Oh my.

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L-

i'm happy that my interpersonal comm class was so fun! it ranks up there as my favorite course from college! my favorite part was the observations- we got to go out with either just our notebooks or with a video camera and make observations. we watched people interact and tried to pinpoint the kind of conversation they were having from their body language, and also did a "work at this college" video where we went around campus and taped people working. we caught the phys plant people running into a tree with their truck in the winter (ha! caught!), and also more phys plant people sleeping on lounge couches when they were supposed to be PAINTING the lounge...

we didn't have to do any artificial communicating. that sounds like it sucked! no wonder you hated it!

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I really only had two classes that frustrated me:

A grad level biology class, which as I recall had something to do with climate and animal metabolism. It was packed with grad students, it had no textbook and no readings available at the library. The prof talked and wrote a mile a minute and tossed out so much new terminology and concepts that I finally reached the point of either listening to him and trying to understand what he said, or try to write it down and figure out later. This was my last semester, and nothing in 4 years of school prepared me for this class. Stuck it out thru the first exam and then dropped. The only class I ever dropped. The prof had started teaching in the 1930's and had slicked back hair, and wore the same oily sweater and trousers every day for a month and a half.

The other class that still annoys me, was Sociology. I attended every class, every discussion, and read all the material, and thought it made sense. The exams seemed to have nothing to do with the material presented, as in the theories didn' make any sense.

a.m.

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Data Structures and Algorithms: I loved the course the first month. Then we had the first test (a programming test), and I did really well on it (88%) because it required real thinking and no rote memorization. But the 'good' students in class (who were actually dumbasses who couldn't think for themselves, but got good grades by memorizing the answers to old tests) decided that there had been cheating in the exam, and made the teacher cancel the test. The make up test was a pure memorization test, and I flunked it (45%). After this test, the teacher went from explaining very well, to just reading his projected Power Point Slides (also what the 'good' students wanted). Add to it the fact that I was also depressed (I went to the teacher and told him I didn't want to take the final and I didn't care if I failed the course), and wanted to quit Engineering. Thus, I started hating the course. Though I gave the teacher a report from the counseling center saying I was seeing them for depression, he failed me.

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Data Structures and Algorithms

I have to take that course for Industrial Engineering the summer before I formally enter a master's program (assuming I get into the master's program at GT).

Not looking forward to it.

I took elementary computer programming (mainly C++ based, with a little assembly code theory at the beginning), and without the help of Comp Sci major friends, I'd have flunked it (somehow, on God's will and the teacher's super-generous curve, however, I got an A).

Computer programming is required for BS bio majors where I went to undergrad, I should probably be thankful that it required such a technical curriculum (including engineering calculus, calculus-based experimental statistics, quantitative biochemistry, calculus-based engineering physics, simulative computer science, etc. etc.).

Speaking of which, I also hated that calc-based experimental stats course. The instructor, a poor young Chinese grad student, had an extremely poor command of the English language (he was worse off than our stereotype of the East Asian grad school student/postdoc). Unfortunately, his miscomprehension extended to switching the terms "divided by" and "minus". He'd write one on the board and say another. As you can imagine, this was counterproductive in terms of our learning experience. I went by what he put on the board. ;)

On the final exam, I wrote him a note, saying "I hope you're happy that the C in this class that I will get will bar me from medical school."

Of course, now I realize that my behavior there 1) constituted being a TOTAL asshole, and 2) also constituted being a total stereotypical pre-med tool... akin to the line of crying students (stereotypically girls) that'd form outside the organic chem prof's office after graded exam results were handed out.

I learned better after that particular semester (fall of my junior/3rd year, specifically). Figured I'd take time off and become a "non-traditional" med student by working in the bio field. Dropped all med school plans at the end of 2005 due to silicovaginosis on behalf of a now ex-boss. Probably the wisest choice in my life. :-)

Yeah ok anyways.

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