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Simple Partial Seizures


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my boyfriend has chronic migraines. last week, he experienced what he described as a "shock feeling" in his brain and he was worried that he had had a stroke, so he called the insurance company's nursing hotline, and they said it wasn't a stroke.

he didn't get into details with me, except that he was fine afterwards, and called this just a "weird experience".

since he didn't get too descriptive about what other effects he was experiencing, i can't say that it would necessrily indicate epilepsy.

do you know about any connection between migraines and epilepsy? is that what a seizure feels like?

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Here's a google search on the subject:

http://www.google.com/search?q=migraines+a...lient=firefox-a

I myself don't have migraines. So I honestly don't know.

I have simple partials, complex partials, but mostly absences and atypical absences

that continue into absence status and atypical absence status. So that's the limit of

my knowledge. Sorry.

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I'm rather slack with epilepsy, I pretty muuch know what my neuro has told me, I don't do much of my own research other than meds...

My simple partials are kinda tingly feelings that usually start in a small part of my then spread, sometimes I wish I could bring it on, they're kinda nice... overshare here... they're fantastic during sex.

And on migraines, when i went in for my first consult with neuro he also diagnosed my migraines. I don't know if that means there was a link... I think it was more to screen for that type of migraine that groovy one has where you just get the aura with no pain... cos that can seem kinda seizury too. There is a name for that, but i don't get auras so i don't know it.

Migraine auras and seizures can be really similar so as far as I know the only way to know for sure is an EEG, or sometimes repeated EEGs

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When they do an eeg they do a battery of thinngs that are likely to cause seizures like flickery lights in your eyes and getting you to hyperventilate. It's alll done under strict control so if things sttart to go haywire they can stop the stimulation so that you won't go clonic or anything.

And even if thhese things don't bring on a seizure, seizures can leave traces in your brain waves so some abnormality can still show up.

The EEG is not the only tool they use, if by chance you saw this event they would no doubt ask you to go in as an eyewitness and describe what he looked like during the event.

From memory the full series is:

1:physical exam (reflexes, blood tests etc)

2:neurological exam (walk to the end of the halllway with dc watching to see if your uncoordinated and off balance)

3:eyewitness accounts

4: MRI (to check for brain trauma, legions from meningococal etc)

5: EEG

Not neccessarily in that order

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When they do an eeg they do a battery of thinngs that are likely to cause seizures like flickery lights in your eyes and getting you to hyperventilate. It's alll done under strict control so if things sttart to go haywire they can stop the stimulation so that you won't go clonic or anything.

Interestingly, only 3-5% (yeah, I could link to somewhere with real citations, but I'm lazy, and I've read that other places) of people with epilepsy are the photosensitive kind, even though it's one of the stereotypes. I'm a lucky winner! It's fun! There have been some studies done that show that hyperventilating doesn't make a whole lot of people have seizures, either, although that one was done with people who stayed on whatever medication they happened to be on at the time. Other people have found it to be a little more effective with unmedicated people, but not incredibly more so, and in that case, mostly to people with temporal lobe epilepsy. Didn't do anything to me, and I even have TLE.

Something they do have people sometimes do is have a sleep-deprived EEG. Staying up all night the night before and showing up that morning for an EEG can also help to provoke seizures, along with those other things. I know that that does definitely work on me, especially after a few days of not getting enough sleep (not a few days of staying up with no sleep...haven't done that for a while), even while taking my meds.

As far as the original question goes, that doesn't sound like anything I've personally had happen, for whatever that's worth, but without knowing any more than that, it's really hard to say much more about it. I don't know a whole lot about any connections between migraines and seizures. I know a pretty healthy amount about seizures at this point, and I've picked up a little bit about migraines, but those things in my brain are kind of separate right now. This might be better for a migraine person than for me, so I'll stop babbling.

Earth! Fire! Wind! Water! Migraine! By your powers combined, I am Captain Seizure!

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This is one of those "chicken/egg" type questions, kind of....

Now I've had some pretty gnarly headaaches and nausea, etc. (ie - the hangover) after a particularly nasty seizure. Now that I think about it. But I can't ever recall a time where I've had a headache BEFORE I had the seizure. (and I've really thought about this) Although my memory is pretty hosed, to the best of my knowledge that's how it is for me. I don't know how it might be for anyone else though. It may be different for them.

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