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What to tell other drs?


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I take Lithium 600mg, 50mg Lamictal (coming off of it), and 60mg Cymbalta. I've recently had to tell a nurse at a dr's office what I was taking and she asked me what they were for. I really didn't know what to tell her. My pdoc has yet to say yes, you are bipolar. Though, he will say he's treating me with meds for bipolar. So, I ended up telling her they were for depression. I really didn't know what to say, and also, found myself nervous about saying bipolar. So, what do you think I should say when asked that question, depression or bipolar? Or, just tell them none of their business ;) ? WWYD?

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My diet clinic needs to know what meds I take and I told them. A nurse asked me what for and I said "depressive issues". When I saw the doctor I told him it was Bipolar Disorder.

I see different nurses on different days and I don't feel in this case it is necessary to tell all these nurses I am bipolar (I did tell one nurse after a few appointments, because she is very knowledgeable and helpful).

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I think that however embarrasing it may be to you, that it is important to be honest with your healthcare professionals. And yes, nurses are professionals too.

If you mislead them, then they will record the wrong information in your chart. For us bipolars, being treated with depression meds, when we are in a manic state can be disastrous. Secondarily, they are constantly learning about the changing use of medications and diseases. So, if you tell her that your meds are for depression, when they are for bipolar disorder, you have given her bogus information and helped confuse her understanding of bipolar disorder.

As I get better, I'm becoming a bit more comfortable with being bipolar, at least with the medical professionals. At least in my mind I can take some satisfaction in how far I have improved since my lowest days.

best,

a.m.

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you (or your insurance) pays these people, and they are paid to serve you, their customer. you are a customer. you shouldn't be ashamed or embarrassed, or at all timid to tell them you're bipolar. that's what your pdoc has said s/he's treating you for, so don't feel reluctant. you take lithium, probably a give-away (some depressed people take it, but it is "the drug" for bipolars).

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Tell 'em you're mad. Why not? If it's a necessity, they can access your records anyway, so you may as well be honest with them...

Um, they can't get the records without a release...hell, they wouldn't even know who to get them from unless you tell them!

Anyways, I always tell the nurse what I'm on--and always, there is some surprise that I actually know what dosage I'm on! Guess it just shows how seriously I take this stuff--seems many people don't. Anyways I don't recall them EVER asking "what for?". I mean, they might ask if you're on an AC (say, Lamictal) because hey, you might have an epilepsy thing going on. The other shit, it doesn't matter why you're on it, and they ought not to be concerned with it IMO.

But, then, I have no worries about telling the nurses and docs I'm bp. They're medical professionals, and they know how to behave. (well this is usually true...)

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CNS, I guess it depends which nurse - if you're in ER cos you were in a car wreck, then no, they wouldn't know where to ask, but they sure as hell need to know. If it's the nurse at your GP surgery, then they can access the records via the doctor (at least this side of the pond, I believe).

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CNS, I guess it depends which nurse - if you're in ER cos you were in a car wreck, then no, they wouldn't know where to ask, but they sure as hell need to know. If it's the nurse at your GP surgery, then they can access the records via the doctor (at least this side of the pond, I believe).

That isn't true! I just went 9 months without seeing my internist in person. The internist knows what HE prescribed, but he has no knowledge of other doctors work. And, I think most of us can understand that we MI folks change meds frequently.

So, it is vital that any practitioner ask what meds any patient is on every time they see them. For example, with Lamictal, and the MAOI's, it is possible to given common medications like antibiotics that would have fatal results.

The best backup is a medic alert bracelet, kept up to date.

a.m.

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Confusion-unregistered is from England AM aren't you from here? Or were you in England a lot?

lilie

No, as my sig says, I'm on the East Coast U.S., though I did live in Camberly, Surrey, south of London for a couple years as a wee lad, [oh, and I lived and worked in Bermuda, a UK overseas territory].

I'm into Mod music from the '60s right now. The two main social and music movements in the UK of the '60s were the Mods (who dressed sharp and rode scooters with way too many rear view mirrors, think preppy with fun dance music), and the Rockers (e.g. Beatles, Rolling Stones, Byrds).

Check out Mr. Suave's Mod Mod World podcast for great mod cuts (old and new) and comment:

http://modrob.podomatic.com/

a.m.

/threadjack

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Aha! I smell a rat! I also used to live in Camberley, and it's west-southwest of London, about 20 miles out. Not south at all.

Anyway, no self respecting mod would claim Camberley was south of London - Croydon is south of london, on the way to Brighton for a good fight on the seafront with the rockers. AM, your credibility is blown! ;-)

And in later years (late 70's), I also got into the mod/ska scene...

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