Jump to content
CrazyBoards.org

Recommended Posts

My 7th grade english teacher showed me how to do mind maps when she noticed that all my outlines were covered with arrows. They have been a major organizational tool for me ever since. There is quite a bit of computer software out there as well.

I'll post some books later.

Freemind is an open source Java based mind mapping program that runs on all platforms. Also on their page is links to other software.

A hand drawn mind map. Isn't that much more fun than making a list or nested outline?

Guru_Mindmap.jpg

MindMapGuidlines.JPG

Tools to check out:

DeepaMehta semantic desktop open source java, may be used locally or online

mymind mac, donationware

Mind Manager Commercial, windows and mac. Expensive but probobly worth it. The most commonly used application for this kind of thing. I'll put up an amazon link later.

Cornerstone, commercial Windows, time limited download.

MindCad Commercial, Mac, integrates with safari, word and desktop

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I learned that technique in school years ago. I've only used it occasionally, but it really works better than just reading through your notes. Also, my ADHD brain seems to like colors and pictures. I used it for a history test once, making mindmaps of every single historical era, complete with coloring and pictures. I got the highest grade. Hm, I really should start doing it again...

I'll check out the links later, thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hmmm.

i make arrows. and use a system of symbols that helps me write faster. but at heart i'm an outliner. by topic or by chronology (but of course things can go off w/in an outline to deal with side issues). i guess i'm lucky that i do think linearly, makes historical analysis easier. (though of course it's not all linear and etc. etc. ) wish i could remember names and dates though. good think life is open note.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

make arrows. and use a system of symbols that helps me write faster. but at heart i'm an outliner. by topic or by chronology (but of course things can go off w/in an outline to deal with side issues). i guess i'm lucky that i do think linearly, makes historical analysis easier. (though of course it's not all linear and etc. etc. ) wish i could remember names and dates though. good think life is open note.

Ever notice how the "normal" kids always did worse than expected on "open note" and "open book" tests? Where their

brains could hold all the pointless trivia in neat, indexed lists ready for retrieval, mine had "You know, there's an index in

the back of the book" scrawled across those neurons.

To answer A.M.'s question, many of us do not store and retrieve information in a clear hierarchical system of topics, sub-topics,

points of discussion, facts. More common would be a variety of relationship networks where any given item may be keyed

to a number of other items and in turn lead to others. When you are storing and retrieving against a system with data loss

and.or corruption built in at every step, redundant and alternate data paths are a necessity. (And don't forget the always-on

random retrieval and review functions)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

I remember the day I first saw a mind map-- what an AHA! moment. I instantly adopted it as my outlining technique. Before that I had killed a lot of trees. See I learned that I could not outline like others on one page-- I'd be down in a section and then Oh yeah! remember that something esle bleonged above or something should be a heading instead of sub heading and have to insert it sideways or in the margin or start over or whatever, so I started to put each hading on one page so I had room to add oafter I had gone past that section-- mind mapping is perfect for me and I use free mind--darn good free program.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...