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Tutoring someone with ADD


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I just found out the student I was tutoring for logic has ADD. He only told me this after the last session. Now it makes sense to me why he needed a tutor since he seemed pretty smart. I'm wondering if I've tutored him the right way.

What I did is explain all the material to him on the first day, and we've been doing problems since. When he's solving the problems, I let him make a mistake, then when he reaches a dead-end, I tell him to retrace his steps and figure out where he's done wrong. Sometimes I stop him when he makes a mistake and tell him he did. Then I repeat the tricks he needs to know.

I'm wondering if this is the right way to tutor someone with ADD. Should I have done it some other way? I would feel guilty if he fails his exam just because I didn't know how to tutor him properly.

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I just found out the student I was tutoring for logic has ADD. He only told me this after the last session. Now it makes sense to me why he needed a tutor since he seemed pretty smart. I'm wondering if I've tutored him the right way.

Memorizing lists of "facts": hard

Remembering information once you've learned how it all fits together: Not so hard.

And yes, I think it does help to let the person work out for himself the feel from both the patterns stuff has when it's being

done right, and the patterns stuff has when it's starting to fall apart. It's like that whole "Mind Mapping" topic - there's a

pattern of relationships to be grown and it's as often as not stored in nonvrebal memory centers.

For example, It's hard to explain just how, but when I'm proofing a text sometimes a passage that an "NT" will gloss over

just seems "wrong" ... more often than not, something in the supporting documents turns out to be bogus. Likewise, when

someone just HAS to engage me in conversation, I usually end up losing the mental image(s) I was working from. By the

time I think I have it back, the jackass is usually back to bother me again.

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  • 1 month later...

I used to have real trouble if interrupted more than once every five or ten minutes while reading. Would read the same few lines over and over until I got pretty mad.

Hard to say if you are tutoring right, though it sounds pretty reasonable. I think, although I don't have a formal basis for this, that ADD people probably have as many different learning styles as any other group of people. So you have to learn what works for the individual.

However, I agree that a structure which relates facts to each other makes it much easier to learn them. Also, reasonably frequent feedback, mostly positive (when justified) will help to maintain motivation when the reasons for studying begin to seem a bit abstract. As long as it doesn't seem like you're looking down on your student or pandering somehow. That's totally unmotivating.

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