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Crazy Meds and Herbal Teas


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I was wondering if it is safe to drink herbal teas, green tea, white tea, etc. while on multiple CM's. It's not exactly somithing you can find out on a drug inter. site.

Here is my med combo:

lamictal, seroquel, klonopin, cymbalta,

Does anyone know/ mel1

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I was wondering if it is safe to drink herbal teas, green tea, white tea, etc. while on multiple CM's. It's not exactly somithing you can find out on a drug inter. site.

Here is my med combo:

lamictal, seroquel, klonopin, cymbalta,

Does anyone know/ mel1

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I checked for interactions between what you take and caffeine, and here's the only one I found:

Moderate Drug-Drug Interaction:  caffeine (caffeine) and Cymbalta (duloxetine)

MONITOR: Coadministration with drugs that are inhibitors of CYP450 1A2 may increase the plasma concentrations of duloxetine, which is partially metabolized by the isoenzyme. According to the product labeling for duloxetine, coadministration with fluvoxamine, a potent CYP450 1A2 inhibitor, resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in peak plasma concentration (Cmax), a 5-fold increase in systemic exposure (AUC), and a 3-fold increase in half-life of duloxetine in 14 male subjects. Other drugs that inhibit CYP450 1A2 metabolism include cimetidine, isoniazid, mexiletine, zileuton. MANAGEMENT: Caution is advised if duloxetine is used with CYP450 1A2 inhibitors. Pharmacologic response to duloxetine should be monitored more closely whenever a CYP450 1A2 inhibitor is added to or withdrawn from therapy.

That was from the AIDSmeds.com page. I know it mentions giving it with Luvox instead of caffeine, but caffeine really does inhibit CYP450 1A2 (I linked to a Pubmed abstract because it was the shortest page I could link to that mentioned both caffeine and CYP450 1A2).

It says here that white tea is less caffeinated than either green tea or black tea. White tea has 15 mg per serving, green tea has 20 mg, and black tea has 40 mg. I'm not saying you should drink it exclusively, seeing as it's kind of expensive.

As for the herbal teas, I would have to see an ingredients list.

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chamomile, orange peell, honey-vanilla flavor, licorice root, roasted chicoryroot, lemon grass.

Iwasn't really worried about the caffeine since I drink a cup of strong coffee each morning and 2diet cokes per day. mel

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chamomile, orange peell, honey-vanilla flavor, licorice root, roasted chicoryroot, lemon grass.

Iwasn't really worried about the caffeine since I drink a cup of strong coffee each morning and 2diet cokes per day. mel

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I did another AIDSmeds search and it turns out that you can check for interactions with licorice and chamomile, of which there were none for what you take. I'm guessing that's because they're used as herbal remedies for something or other. I know chamomile is used as a sedative, but I don't think I ever knew what licorice is supposed to do.

The only interactions from drugdigest were alcohol and clonazepam (duh), chamomile and alchohol (poorly documented) and licorice and chamomile. The last one has to be seen to be believed:

CHAMOMILE may interact with LICORICE

Both chamomile and licorice contain chemicals that may reduce the blood's ability to form clots. When taken together, they can increase the risk of dangerous bleeding. In general, chamomile and licorice should not be taken together. If you take both, however, your doctor should be informed. You may need frequent blood tests to make sure that your blood is clotting properly. If you experience problems, you may need to stop taking chamomile, licorice, or both. You may want to ask your healthcare provider about this potential interaction if you think you are having problems.

This interaction is poorly documented and is considered minor in severity.

Last Updated: May 2005

The documentation on that must be piss-poor if they think it's minor.

The THE MERCK MANUAL OF MEDICAL INFORMATION--SECOND HOME EDITION, Introduction in Ch. 19, Medicinal Herbs and Nutraceuticals has a table of drug/herb/nutrient interactions that does not mention one between chamomile and licorice, but does mention that chamomile "may reduce iron absorption."

Pubmed mentions chamomile and bleeding here, here, and here. The second link says that chamomile contains coumarin, which Michael W. Davidson of Florida State University says that:

Coumarin is the parent organic compound of a class of naturally occurring phytochemicals found in many plant species. This oxygen heterocycle is best known for its fragrance, described as a vanilla-like odor or the aroma of freshly mowed hay. Identified in the 1820s, coumarin has been synthesized in the laboratory since 1868 and used to make perfumes and flavorings. It is also used to prepare other chemicals -- in particular anticoagulants and rodent poison.

Coumarin is found in a variety of plants such as Tonka bean, lavender, sweet clover grass, and licorice, but also occurs in food plants such as strawberries, apricots, cherries, and cinnamon. It is thought to work by serving as a pesticide for the plants that produce it.

Chemically, coumarin can occur either free or combined with the sugar glucose to produce a coumarin glycoside. Medically, coumarin glycosides have been shown to have blood-thinning, anti-fungicidal, and anti-tumor activities. Dicumarol, a coumarin glycoside better known as warfarin, is the most commonly used oral anticoagulant medication.

I don't think the levels in tea are enough to make someone bleed to death who isn't taking blood-thinners.

I wish they'd say where they got that, because I still haven't found it.

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Damn girl, you are GOOD.  Coumarin in chamomile and licorice?  Who'd'a thunk it?  (My husband has "sticky" blood and is prone to blood clots, so he's supposed to take things that thin it out.  Which is why your response caught my eye.)

I think licorice is used for adrenal fatigue, btw.  I'd be taking it now, except that it also contributes to high blood pressure.

Anyhow, I'm sure you're right -- the amounts in a cup of herbal tea are probably negligible.

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Proper herbal tea shouldnt contain any cafiene, I havent touched cafeine in about 8 years or so, i live on herbal teas like Nettle, peppermint, camomile, peach etc

Best is to check with a alternative health administor if unsure

x

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Proper herbal tea shouldnt contain any cafiene, I havent touched cafeine in about 8 years or so, i live on herbal teas like Nettle, peppermint, camomile, peach etc

Best is to check with a alternative health administor if unsure

x

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I checked for caffeine because she listed green tea and white tea.

Sorry for any confusion.

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Damn girl, you are GOOD.  Coumarin in chamomile and licorice?  Who'd'a thunk it?  (My husband has "sticky" blood and is prone to blood clots, so he's supposed to take things that thin it out.  Which is why your response caught my eye.)

I think licorice is used for adrenal fatigue, btw.  I'd be taking it now, except that it also contributes to high blood pressure.

Anyhow, I'm sure you're right -- the amounts in a cup of herbal tea are probably negligible.

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Actually, that second abstract only mentions chamomile as having coumarin in it.

However, these other abstracts mentions licorice containing three coumarin derivatives (I clicked on the second abstract because the first one didn't make it clear).

I don't know what they do, though.

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SOOL-Thank you- that was alot of helpful info. Isn't a blood thinner the opposite of an anticoagulent?(sp?) I wanted to try and cutback on caffeine to see if it helps with my anxiety and drink herbal teas instead. Plus, black, white, and green tea all have so many anti-oxidantproperties. I think I will be brave and try the tea. Thanks all, love, Melissa

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  • 2 months later...

There's a licorice supplement available called "DGL" diglicerized licorice.  They put it through a process which apparently makes it safe for all the blood thinning, etc stuff mentioned above.  As far as I know in my research and reading and talking to herbalists. Look into it if interested. Licorice is really great for adrenals and detoxing in general and digestion/stomach lining protection.....All things usefull for those of us on pharmos.  There's one brand of the DGL that tastes far superior to the others.  I can't think of it and I'm out at the moment.  It's a lightish blue bottle with darker blue writing.  I'll try to come back with the company name. - Diana

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