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Mild hallucinations, what to make of it?


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At present my fiance is having slight hallucinations, with a mix of depression. 3 1/2 months ago she gave birth to our baby girl, and ever since being home with her these past months she has had some issues creep back up within her present life.

As a girl around 8 years old she would have frightful experiences when trying to go to sleep, as she would be terrified someone was going to scream up in her face, she thought many a time that someone did. She would take solace in talking to shadowy figures she would hallucinate. This seemed to wane a bit throughout her years as she grew older into her teens. Though now she is having a bit more of this issue crop back up.

One thing that is exacerbating her issue is definitely trying a CNS stimulant (Dexedrine) for ADHD symptoms. She tried them for a couple of days and she's back seeing these shadows again, also something to note is that she has very little feeling for others during these experiences (last night she clocked me accidentally in the eye with her elbow and didn't show the least concern). She really does lock into these shadowy figures, she feels so compelled to. I've known her for about 2 years and have only seen this happen twice (pretty much been around her the majority of the time). Prior to the CNS stim, she was seeing the shadows a bit out of the corners of her eyes.

It seems the CNS stim really makes this issue worse, which makes me think of a definite mood disorder or schizo-affective disorder as the dopamine and nor-epinephrine are thrown out of whack (during the stim dose she is fine, it's just coming off of the dose).

The thing that sucks the most is she is dead tired during the day, her sleep isn't good at all, and due to her reactions to a CNS stim she really can't get help for a narcoleptic symptom (though maybe overall another disorder is causing the tiredness). I've seen Abilify described decently as an anti-psychotic that doesn't cause too much tiredness compared to others in it's same field.

Any suggestions of what may be her disorder at hand would be appreciated.

As well as any suggestions on solutions.

The obvious actions to take involve staying way the hell away from anything that exacerbates her condition.

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Has she seen a psychiatrist? Is she being honest about her symptoms? If not, it sounds like she really, really needs to do so. i.e., she needs to be working with a competent professional who is fully aware of what's going on, not getting diagnosed amateurly diagnosed off the internet.

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Just a comment/idea/conversation . There is no such thing as mild hallucinations or mild psychosis. There can be some insight that can fade. Hallucinations can follow some idea or thought and there may be meaning to it, but I don't think anyone should place any importance on the thread that they follow. Any conclusions that are drawn while someone is psychotic can't be conclusive. Some things seem someway when I am psychotic and then when I'm well they don't hold true. Nobody can diagnose someone over the internet.

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he heh he, I wasn't looking for a diagnosis, pretty much some ideas. Diagnosing someone is definitely something that occurs over a length of time in a doctor/patient relationship.

my main concern right now is considering symptoms. I am not an individual that takes much zeal in delighting in the opinions of psychiatrists, as I do have the opinion that the decent psychiatrists out there are slim to none. I've been to the top ones in a decently populated area and they really are incompetent in their diagnosis and manners of giving prescriptions (the major defect they seem to struggle with is giving excessive diagnosis and dosages when prescribing meds). It's literally : I cost $250 an hour, I'll see you for 30 minutes and charge you for the full hour, and in 30 minutes I'll figure you out as if you were a puzzle of ease. You walk out of the room with a script for a disorder that you do not have and find yourself worse off than you were prior to seeing such a doctor, and your bank roll has very much dropped out from the bottom of your pockets.

there is definitely a lack a doctor/patient relationship, and thus I have such an issue with just going to a psychiatrist to get help for someone I care about. I really wouldn't want to leave someone as such at the whims of an idiot. Litterally I can't believe some of these psychiatrists even got through med-school. A couple of examples: (1) one psychiatrist gave a script of Strattera, 40 mgs for the first 2 days, and 80 mgs each following day for the rest of the month! (sounds like they're listening to drug reps instead of reading up on research), (2) another psychiatrist prescribed 80 mgs of Geodon to an individual complaining of ADHD and tiredness, heh hah, the worst script I've seen, as the symptoms weren't remotely addressed and the individual completely lost their job due to the inability to stay awake during the day (the reason they went to the p-doc was to attain help for concentration and lack of energy, now they find themselves going into their first psychotic episode and unable to function 50% of what they could before they went to the p-doc, and (3) after the p-doc realizes this obviously was a mis-read diagnosis, he hands a 30mg script of Adderall to the patient who has mentioned OCD issues, and tells the patient that everything will now be just fine, "just think it'll be okay" he says, "and it'll be all-right, it's all about the thought process", geezus I guess the patient got to find out how exacerbated an OCD disorder can become without being put on a buffing med such as an SSRI.

Definitely why I ask questions on boards instead of going directly to someone I don't even have a chance to get to know what their capabilities and talents consist of, so that is why I kinda find it humorous to get the responses that I have.

The fiance is doing fine right now, her problems primarily arise when she takes a stim.

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If you can't trust people with that much specific education, how can you trust us? You know nothing about any of our credentials beyond what we tell you, and most of us don't have training in any relevant area. We're self-taught. Psychiatrists are taught a *lot*.

If her problems *primarily* arise when she takes a stim, it sounds like she is having some problems that aren't stim-related.

What are her thoughts and concerns on going to a psychiatrist herself? You mention going to a psychiatrist yourself to get help for her, but that's not generally the way it works.

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reasons for asking opinions from individuals here on this board, mainly due to trusting the experiences of others to be of some worth. I don't doubt the knowledge built up within psychopharmacology and neurological sciences, nor do I doubt the individuals that excell in those fields, it just seems that the majority of these individuals never cross over to the arena of actually helping people hands on in psychiatric care and counsel. And I can't get past the p-docs that don't listen to the experience of their patients, I just have a lot of bias.

It's not necessarily me pushing my fiance to go to the p-doc, nor am I going for her, I've just been through the ropes more than a few times and lend my experience to her on such subjects. She'd prefer not to go to a p-doc due to the cost. I'm willing to front the cash to help her out, no insurance is a drag.

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It would be great if you could go with her to the pdoc and tell him your fears due to bad experiences. I had many bad tdocs (had me arrested at 16 because I went to meet my friend for ice cream) and when I got a good tdoc she was horrified and said she was surprised I even stepped into her office with my preconceived notions on what would happen. I never knew I could be taken seriously, and you sound like you have your major doubts about pdocs. I say give someone a chance to help her you may very well be surprised (as I have been these past few years!)

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it's good to see some optimistic experiences. I guess my experiences with p-docs really does shine through. I just hate the disregard for the patient's well being that I've seen from many psychiatrists, they treat them like they are their 11 o'clock apointment and not like human beings.

I presently have a great p-doc that I like a lot, she's just so expensive though at first, guess I'll just have to stomach the expenditures. She's one of the best in the state, and thus she costs a lot, and actually doesn't accept all patients that apply, probably about 50 percent of applicants she accepts..... it was kinda surprising to me when she interviewed me, i was like "huh? I gotta get accepted as a patient". A major thing she stressed was that she wouldn't take me as a patient if I didn't have a very strong desire to get healthier.

It's just been disapointing in that I've had my fiance go to a few p-docs in our area that were rated decently, and these doctors were just a disapointment and charged a large sum for 'nothin.

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Hi. How is she doing? You? The baby?

I hope you realize that she should not be left alone with the baby if she is hallucinating/experiencing post partum depression/pychosis.

Am thinking that her symptoms might be increasing in frequency and that it could be a coincidence with the timing and start of that medication.

I think you will probably need to be her voice for now as she may not be in much shape to communicate with health professionals.

Psychiatrists are not an expert on anybody because everyone's response to treatment is individual. Besides ADHD does not seem to be the issue that needs priority treatment right now.

I have had psychiatrists who ask me what I think should be done with my meds. One time I did not know and the psychiatrist asked a pharmacist for advice. The pharmacists ideas applied to me so we followed that advice.

Please don't let your personal negative experiences with the psychiatric profession hinder her in getting help that she desperately needs.

Reach out to whatever community rescources that can be found to help with this.

You can find out later if what is happening with her now has any relation to what experiences she has had in the past.

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