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How do you find a good pdoc?


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Is there any type of research that you can do to find a good pdoc, or do you pretty much just have to open the phone book and take a shot in the dark? I am retiring (medically) from the military and the pdoc I see now only treats active duty members so I can't continue to see him after my date of separation. I don't even know where to start in trying to find a new doc. What types of questions would be good things to ask when looking for a new pdoc?

Any advice or input would be helpful. Thanks.

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You're likely going to be limited by who your insurance or HMO will cover.

It really depend on what you're dealing with. Some pdocs are specialists and some are generalists.

Clinics associated with University hospitals are usually not a bad idea. They are more likely to follow current research and not get all their info on new drugs from pharmaceutical company reps.

You can ask the pdoc to describe their practice and what kind of things they normally treat. If you have a specific diagnosis that isn't one of the more common ones, you can ask what percentage of their practice is patients with that condition.

If you're dealing with issues resulting from your military service, congress is working to pass the largest funding increase in the history of the VA, assuming bush doesn't veto it. Hopefully mental health services for vets will get better soon.

A good blog for info on that kind of stuff:

http://ptsdcombat.blogspot.com/

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in addition to VE's ideas, which are all awesome, i'd suggest asking the leader or members of a local support group who they might go to and what they think of their practitioner, and even friends you may have who you trust and who would give you reviews of their practitioner.

for me, i don't have much of a choice, because i have to go to a community health care center and there are only so many people there i can go to. i go to a nurse practitioner because i feel he knows just as much as the doctor about the conditions and meds, and i get way more time with him and personal attention. don't forget about other people, like nurse practitioners, who are also licensed to RX meds who may be a good choice, and make sure that whoever you choose that your health care plan will cover this person.

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Ask your current pdoc. When my fiancee got medicaid, i asked my pdoc--he no longer accepted medicaid patients (and has since stopped accepting new patients) but he recommended a couple in town. My fiancee, after going to the local mental health clinic, ended up at another pdoc--actually more of a mental health center--but hey--it never hurts to ask. Your pdoc, even if he is somewhat insulated by being military, should know the lay of the land pdoc-wise in your area.

So go ahead--ask.

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Another idea is to find out if your state has a doctors database. It lists lots of info- training, specialties, when they got their license, publications they have printed, specailties. Also helpful on what insurance they accept, along with if they have been reprimanded and if they're board certified (yes, you can practice even when not board certified, at least in my state.) I tried to google for ya but the sites confused me and I'm quite manic so forgive me. Maybe you'll have better luck. I know there is a site out there like I describe...I swear...I swear...<as they carry me away in a straightjacket> :ph34r:

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My best luck has come from recommendations from professionals I already trust. In other words, ask your current doc for a recommendation. If you have any friends who think highly of their doc, ask them to ask for recommendations, or ask to see that doc, too. My therapist recommended two good psychiatrists to me.

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Yep, asking your current doc--even a medical doc you like --is a good thing. I also tend to steer toward nurse-practitioners. Be prepared, tho--I don't know where you live, but finding a doc that would even see me down here, not to mention one that was honest and helpful, was almost impssible. I ended up in the ER making a huge scene just trying to get a referral to SOMEBODY.

Docs should come with warning lables!!

china

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I'd agree with above- that if you have a tdoc or a primary care doc, they may be able to recommend someone.

Another good resource can be local psych hospitals-if you are in or near a big city a teaching hospital may have resident(still in training) pdocs who you might be able to see for lower cost.

YOu could also look into local universities with medical schools. Professors usually have outside practices in addition to teaching.

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