Jump to content
CrazyBoards.org

Is there an average healthy weight range?


Recommended Posts

Ok, I am completely in the dark about how people diet and lose weight with these kinds of situations. I was wondering if anyone knew what the right weight range was for a 5'4" tall 46 year old female. I've got to lose some of this due to high blood pressure, diabetes risk and assorted other issues. Since being on Seroquel and having my thyroid go belly up, I've gained about 50 pounds (At 180-ish right now)

HELP! ;)

Pudge princess Panz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Panz,

Dont quote me or anything, but I am a 31 and weigh in the 180s. My ideal body wieght is spose to be between 135 and 150 ish. I think whats more important is your you BMI. A healty BMI is between 19 and and 24 percent.

Have you heard of Alli? I dont know if it would suit you, but its the first fda approved otc diet pill. When you take it, it blocks 25 percent of the fat in your mean from you body digesting it. It gives you oil poo though. Thats why Im scared to take it.

selene

Btw, Iam 5'4 too..thats why I responded

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm 5'4" too!! We should start a club. People don't realize that when you are that height, that is a big weight gain. I am in the same boat as you. I just got weighed and actually looked for the first time in over 6 months. I went from 125-size 6- to 165-size unknown because I am living in stretch pants as none of my clothes fit. I have to get tested for diabetes as I have a family history and had gestational diabetes. This wt. gain happened in 2 years-from meds. I'm putting myself on the diabetes diet and exercising every day. My goal is to lose 20 pounds by the end of Sept.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I mean... I am not a *huge* fan of the BMI scale because there are some other things that need to be taken into account other than just your height and your weight. The scale does have its limitations in measuring the total body fat of an individual (which is basically what it measures). So, basically, it is better to use it as an approximation and not as an end all and be all scale, you know? For example, it could overestimate body fat in people who might have more muscle mass than the average individual. It might also underestimate body fat in people who have lost muscle mass for one reason or another (example: old age)... and, of course some other various things... I don't know...

They say that a person is underweight if they have a BMI of 18.4 or lower.

It is said that you are of a normal and healthy weight if your BMI measures between 18.5 and 24.9.

One is considered overweight if the measure of that individual's BMI is between 25.5 and 29.9.

Lastly, a person is considered obese if he/she has a BMI of 30 or above.

So, yeah... In my humble opinion, it is better not to focus all of your efforts based on the Body Mass Index scale. Someone like me, for example, sometimes takes it to an extreme because of eating disorder issues. So, no, I do not exactly practice what I preach in this case. I do, personally, get very sensitive with the BMI, especially as of late. I have gained a few pounds over the summer and am very upset about it.... but, anyway, my BMI keeps fluctuating in the "normal" range to sometimes a few points (as in, like, 25.7 or something) into the "overweight" range. When I look at myself, I see myself as overweight, but a lot of that is probably my disorder and horrible self image. But if I were to look at another individual who was a size 6... well... I would not think that they were overweight even though the BMI says otherwise. Do I make any sense at all? I mean, come on... according the the BMI, my "normal range" weight is approximately 101lbs - 136lbs. Okay, fine, but let me tell you that there is probably (as much as I would love it to be possible) no chance in hell that I would ever be able to weight around 100lbs. Just simply with the way I am built, as much as I do not want to admit it, it just....no. About a month and a half ago when I came home from school after losing a lot of weight, my parents and people I worked with told me that it was too much and not to lose any more weight (even though I was planning on doing so until I started binging like mad). I was certainly not 100lbs then... not even close, really.

Sorry for the rant that got a little off topic...

For what it is worth, I would just focus on getting healthy and not focus so much on a "weight range" because it gets extremely overwhelming. It is better to set goal weights at intervals possibly so that you do not completely make yourself crazier than you already are, lol ;) . So, if you are 180lbs, maybe set your first goal weight to be 170. When you reach that, go a little lower, and so on... I would think that with all of the medical issues you listed (high blood pressure, diabetes risk...) that one of your main goals should just simply be to just overall make healthier decisions when it comes to foods and activities. With those, some weight loss will follow. But remember, it isn't just about your weight, it is about being healthy. (wow... *me* of all people saying some of this stuff is really funny, but, again, do as I say, not as I do! lol)

Have you spoken with your doctor recently about some of these issues (like high blood pressure)? Maybe your doctor could possibly have some helpful advice and suggestions... maybe...

I don't know. If what I said made absolutely no sense to you, then I guess you can disregard it. My thought are very jumbled and disjointed lately. oh well.

Be well.

~*Ophelia*~

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with Ophelia on the BMI... it doesn't take into account what build you are. I do NOT have a delicate body, my shoulders are wide, as are my hips and legs. Somewhere along the way I think I came from peasantry. Anyway, I dropped down to 112 a couple of years ago (I am 5')... and even strangers told me I looked too gaunt. My daughter is 5'2"... and weighs 88 lbs, but it looks different on her, she's so delicate that she looks like she could break. Completely, totally different body build.

So, yeah, I think it's more about *your* comfort level with your body, how you feel, how healthy you are (do you exercise, or plan to?), etc. I need to lose some seroquel weight too, I'm so pissed that I packed on 20 lbs seemingly overnight.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I am 5'2" and weigh 170. I agree it's a huge difference when you gain on shorter frames.

I just wanted to mention that I took Alli while it was still a prescription. If you eat fatty junk food, you will have "oily poo" and it will leak and you will not be able to control it. However, if you eat good low fat food, this will not happen. You kind of get punished for cheating on this stuff. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

First things first. You said 'thyroid belly up'. So, treat the hypothyroidism. Don't look away; treat it. It's not hard but most docs don't know how.

Labs: T4, free T3, TSH, autoantibodies. Evaluate: if T4 is below 50th percentile of normal range, give T4 (levothyroxine). Start at 100 mcg, but you'll probably need 125 to 137.5. Retest. Then, if T3 is below 50th percentile of its normal range, give 5 mcg Cytomel. Keep adding Cytomel until you feel better and T3 is still in normal range. (You probably won't need more than 15 mcg).

If autoantibodies are present, you want to monitor that. And, if they are, keep treating with the levothyroxine and Cytomel and see if they go down. Try to get the TSH down as low as possible, and keep it there. Endo docs are taught that TSH should be in 'normal' range. They are wrong. If you have autoantibodies, then you have Hashi's, and are not a normal person.

Read elsewhere to find out more about treating thyroid. This is NOT trivial. It's a huge piece of your mental stability and your ability to get thin, shit normally, and feel OK in a thousand ways.

Also: you may need ancillary hormone support. DHEA should be tested and supplemented. For women 25 mg/day is usually enough. Too much and you'll get acne, facial hair.

For myself, my 40+ year Hashi's didn't get more normal till I added pregnenolone. OTC, inexpensive. I'm taking 200 mg and could probably take more. It supplements adrenal, which in me is exhausted.

For myself, also, autoantibodies didn't zero out until I got dx'd and treated (30+ years too late) for Lyme disease.

Test and treat all possible infections. Lyme, yeast, chronic viruses---all this ratchets up your immune response and with it, your nuttiness.

You said 'belly up'. When? Are you in your thirties? You are already premenopausal, you just don't know it. Your estrogen is already declining, your progesterone has significantly declined. Look into natural hormone supplementation. Get levels tested frequently.

1 in 8 women have thyroid disease. MOST women with mental illness have it.

I don't usually read or post in this forum---I was actually here looking for info on antipsychotics that don't cause weight gain, cuz my sister's clearly off on a bipolar II/mixed-state-manic/BPD bender again but she won't take antipsychotics due I think mostly to that side effect (she's very body conscious and is a serious runner but still gains weight on them).

Anyone who can send info on Abilify, Geodon, lithium, anything to get her a little more insight and frontal-lobe executive functioning would be appreciated. I'd let her just slide and hit her own bottom--again--but we share care of a cat and her confusing behavior is really upsetting him and it's no fair to the boy.

Oh, and any referral to psychiatrists, Bay Area. She doesn't have one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

In almost the exact same situation - hypothyroid and seroquel and weight gain. Not too much yet but I'm terrified it will continue. I want to stick with the Seroquel - it's really helping - and am having trouble upping my levothyroxin - I get really, really anxious/hyper. Not sure what to do. Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Range:

healthy enough that fat stores aren't maxed, flooding the body with inflammatories etc., i'd call that the upper limit and diabetes/atherosclerosis danger. energy stores able to flux i think is key

at the low end: healthy hair, energy for the day (with seroquel fudge factor), insulation from the cold, decent muscle tone, cholesterol enough to produce estrogen and be regular

very unnumbered criteria huh...?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Guest_prsfone_*

In almost the exact same situation - hypothyroid and seroquel and weight gain. Not too much yet but I'm terrified it will continue. I want to stick with the Seroquel - it's really helping - and am having trouble upping my levothyroxin - I get really, really anxious/hyper. Not sure what to do. Good luck!

OK, well, great that the Seroquel is really helping. Always good to hear that *anything* is really helping *anybody*!

Weight gain did happen for my sister on that drug and she stopped taking it. Of course you know it's not your fault, blah

blah and you may not be able to do anything about it now.

But re: the thyroid thing, I'm confused as to why you are trying to up your levothyroxine if you are having the hyper sx.

What is your level now, at what dose of T4, and where is that in your lab's range? Cuz that might just be right for you.

The hyper sx may really indicate too much supplementation. Another hypothesis, and I don't know if this is common, but

maybe some people with bipolar tendencies are just super-sensitive to thyroid and get manic on just the teeniest too much?

This I could believe actually.

My doc, btw, does now say there's a study saying Synthroid brand is better than generic. So you could change to that. Tho

I will be surprised it will make that much difference.

But in meantime, if tests and other sx (constipation, dry skin/hair, absent outer edge of eyebrow hair falling out there,

etc) indicate you really are still clinically hypothyroid,

I'd suggest just going up even slower, with smaller dose increments, than endo docs usually do. And, consider the pregnenolone

thing. It helped a given dose of T4 work in me a LOT better.

And, you, doghappy, and everyone else here struggling with weight and meds, really give yourselves a huge round of applause

and love for doing this for yourselves. I admire and applaud you all for facing your situations and grappling with it. Love yourselves

and your bodies however they are as much as you're able. Meds in the future WILL get better, OK? I know it. Hang in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Guest_prsfone_*

In almost the exact same situation - hypothyroid and seroquel and weight gain. Not too much yet but I'm terrified it will continue. I want to stick with the Seroquel - it's really helping - and am having trouble upping my levothyroxin - I get really, really anxious/hyper. Not sure what to do. Good luck!

oh, and btw, there was a thyroid disease topic on Tara Parker Pope's blog 'Well' on the NYT Health section recently. A bunch of people did write in saying that the iodine supplementation approach did help them. It did NOT help me at all, but that's me. So that blog topic is worth looking at for links on where in the net to find info on how to get tested for that iodine deficiency thing and how to do the supplementation to see if it'll help your thyroid meds work better.

yyou really do got to do everything.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also another thing to consider when taking thyroid medication, A LOT of medications, supplements and even foods can interact with it. One thing that I was surprised to find out was that soy and soy products can really affect your thyroid and not in a good way. Sorry if that doesn't make sense. My nitey meds are kicking in. I'll try to post some links tomorrow when I'm more clear headed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...