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Problem Relating Short-Term Decisions with Long-Term Results


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Pills: Adderall XR 30mg morning, 15 IR afternoon, Lexapro: 20mg evening (stopped 2 weeks ago)

Notes: used to take risperdal / geodon to help with this. They helped a lot, but had other side effects that were just no good. ie - penis wouldn't work (didn't work with lex either, barely showing any signs of life these days). geodon also gave me nasty EPS, embarrassingly nasty.

I am having a lot of trouble connecting my short-term decision making with future outcomes. How have you been able to cope with this? It frustrates me to no end how I have such a limited capacity to choose where I focus my energy and concentration. This is true in a professional and a personal sense.

For example, there are several topics related to work which, if I would follow through on learning them and the projects around them, would almost certainly lead to a very promising future with my industry. These topics interest me, I enjoy reading about them, thinking about them ,but I cannot for the life of me finish any projects related to them, I get sidetracked by other related info, and in the end, nothing gets done.

How can I channel my energies better? This is killing me and it feels like I'm running into a brick wall every single day. Any suggestions? I'm at wits end and have no clue where to turn. I really need to get my sh*t together, it feels like its turning point time. ;)

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i'm not ADD but i've found

talking to old folks helps. in life they've found the long-term results and damn well remember the little decisions that got them there. sometimes that perspective really helps

"be careful whose advice you buy, but be patient with those who supply it. Advice is a form of nostalgia, it's a way of fishing the past out of the disposal, painting over the ugly parts, and recycling it for more than it is worth" -Baz Luhrman, good speech/song

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thought mapping has helped a couple of my students with this. from using it to get ideas for their essays in order, a couple of my ld students got very excited about the technique's potential to help them get their practical life-type plans in order. in the center goes a goal, specific or general. then ideas on smaller and more specific goals go around it, and the steps probably needed to get to any of the goals on the page. then these things get lines drawn between them to make constellations and paths of what belongs together. and then that goes into a list, and the list goes into practice (with things written into an agenda or dayplanner, especially the detailed early steps). i'm not tutoring them in life planning, for sure, so i don't discuss this application with them in great detail, but it has helped the two students i'm thinking of to organize murky half-thoughts into a logical, follow-able path from the present moment to whatever it is they want to do later. maybe you could develop some similar written method to make the connection between now, next week, and next year more tangible, so you can be better about working toward things?

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Get this book:

http://astore.amazon.com/crazyboards05-20/...2521978-4907223

I don't care if you get it through us or not, but get your hands on a copy. It's the only book of its kind that's made a difference for me.

Here is a summery of how it works from 43-folders

So how does GTD work?

This is a really summarized version, but here it is, PowerPoint-style:

1. identify all the stuff in your life that isn

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Thanks for the suggestions - I should clarify a few things here. I have a good grasp of planning when I get to it, I also understand the steps or pieces needed to get to a certain goal. What i have trouble doing is acting on those known steps, it's as if something blocks me from using mental energy on those steps, and my mind shuts down.

Instead, my mind wanders off to looking at "new" stuff: new ways to do what i do, new ways to do things my coworkers do, anything new gets my focus over anything that is known. I *know* that if I were to complete a particular project and follow through with it, it will lead to significant rewards - both careerwise and compensation wise. It also promises to give me a working life that I claim to desire, yet I cannot focus my energy on this project. There are a few such projects I can take on right now (yes, I do realize that I am in a very fortunate situation), yet I just can't seem to do it.

Something's just not right, and I'm close to freaking out again because my only solutions seem to be finding a new job, new country to live in, new anything. I know this can't be the solution though, too many things seem too right at this moment.

The most frustrating thing is that these projects that I am not following through with are projects which I have frequently stated I enjoy, things that make me feel good when I work on them, but now I'm at this block and can't progress. The projects are currently at their most complex point - going through now means lots of intense concentration, which may also be a problem.

I dont know what to do. ;) help

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You have my sympathy.

There are medications that can help with executive functioning. Strattera, Wellbutrin and provigil can be helpful when used as an augmentation to a stimulant. Omega-3 supplements can also help.

Keep in mind that if you just quit lexapro a couple weeks ago you're likely still feeling some rebound and discontinuation effects from that.

Did you take a look at the summery for "getting things done?' I'm serious. Get a copy of that book. There are some other adult ADD books which have tips for that kind of thing in them.

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Thanks for the suggestions - I should clarify a few things here. I have a good grasp of planning when I get to it, I also understand the steps or pieces needed to get to a certain goal. What i have trouble doing is acting on those known steps, it's as if something blocks me from using mental energy on those steps, and my mind shuts down.

Right.

It is probably more accurate to say that you have a grasp on the theory of planning. You have your sketches, outlines, various research, notes on things to add, notes on things to skip ... but where's the planning for the fact that you really just don't feel like doing a goddamned thing, and will not do any of it if left to your own devices? Like everything else, factor in your own negative qualities into the planning.

Of course your mind shuts down when you suddenly remember all the stuff that you need to do but have been putting off for quite a while and none of it is anything you want to do at the moment. That's what ADHD brains do. (Well, the list is longer than that, but it's one of the less obnoxious qualities of an ADHD brain.)

The most frustrating thing is that these projects that I am not following through with are projects which I have frequently stated I enjoy, things that make me feel good when I work on them, but now I'm at this block and can't progress.

Try this: pick ONE project. Not projectS, but A project. Now. Not tomorrow. Not next week. Not when you're settled in at the new place.

Quit thinking of snappy comeback replies about how that's easier said than done. Get it done, then complain about how hard it was.

So what's next, the most disastrous/impossible one of the bunch? Here's a clue - you're the only one who'll be suffering; everyone else will be laughing behind your back.

Finally have an honest choice in mind?

That's a start.

Write it down on something you won't forget about, or lose, or put away in a safe place - before you go on to the next thing that pops up and helps you forget your decision.

Commit yourself to doing it, to people who are going to ride your case until you do finish it.

The project may not work out as expected, but even then you'll know what to do better (or avoid) next time.

Sometimes the only way around decision paralysis is to just close your eyes, pick something out of the pile, and take your chances.

The projects are currently at their most complex point - going through now means lots of intense concentration, which may also be a problem.

If the projects really require you to concentrate on what you're doing, discuss the concept of "not being interrupted" with your supervisor.

Ask IT to install site-blocking software on your workstation.

Schedule a 1-3 hour block during which you refuse to take calls/visits.

Clue people in on the concept of "If it's not in writing, it doesn't exist. Send an email with the information and stop pestering you with stuff you'll forget in 5 minutes anyway. "

Buy a CD player with headphones. Even with the player off, people think twice before needlessly interrupting a person listening to their tunes.

Periodically get up from your work place and physically take a break when your brain locks up. It's not like sitting there was helping.

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Get this book:

[link=http://astore.amazon.com/crazyboards05-20/detail/0142000280/002-2521978-4907223" target="_blank]http://astore.amazon.com/crazyboards05-20/...2521978-4907223[/link]

I don't care if you get it through us or not, but get your hands on a copy. It's the only book of its kind that's made a difference for me.

Thanks for the book reference VE. That describes my never-ending cycle of things-to-do, anxiety, procrastination, rummination, and struggling to remember but losing focus to a tee. Now I just have to get a job so I can buy that book..

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