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benzodiazepine receptors


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can't seem to find an explanation as to what these receptors do when benzos are not introduced into one's system.

do they just lay around idle, waiting for some action?

or is there a function that they play without the introduction of pharmaceuticals?

it would seem to be a nonsensical name for a component mind part if there are no benzos naturally occurring in a decently functioning brain?

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can't seem to find an explanation as to what these receptors do when benzos are not introduced into one's system.

do they just lay around idle, waiting for some action?

or is there a function that they play without the introduction of pharmaceuticals?

it would seem to be a nonsensical name for a component mind part if there are no benzos naturally occurring in a decently functioning brain?

Benzos typically affect the GABA system in the brain. This is a very active system that often is involved in the fight/flight response and thus is responsible for panic attacks and anxiety in many people.

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Hey, r.mcm-

There's an illustration here, to add to what Chimpmaster just said... basically reiterates the point that GABA-A receptors are around all the time, benzodiazepines just happen to fit on in there and modify their action.

Julien also has a short description of the mechanism of action.

There's a lot more detail available... do you want gruesome details, or just daily-use-type information?

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And so just for fun...

When you "inhibit the action potential" of the nerve (which the CNS Forum link says BZD helps GABA do if I'm understanding this right), what's the end result? I know it makes the neuron less likely to fire, but uhhh.... what's that "look" like? I'm assuming it matters which neurons it's monkeying with?

Peace,

Wooster (who learned this once about a dozen years ago and could, in some conceivable parallel universe actually remember it)

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When you "inhibit the action potential" of the nerve (which the CNS Forum link says BZD helps GABA do if I'm understanding this right), what's the end result? I know it makes the neuron less likely to fire, but uhhh.... what's that "look" like? I'm assuming it matters which neurons it's monkeying with?

Not to be dim, but I'm dim today. What do you mean by "look like?"

On re-reading what I wrote, let me clarify something; there are such things as BZD receptors. Central benzodiazepine receptors exist as a part of the overall GABA-A receptor complex. Here's a nice review article. (It's 6 years old, and I'm sure there are updates, but it's a solid review for at least the basic mechanism of action.) If you scroll down to figure 1c, it gives you a graphic representation of this concept. But the GABA receptor complex exists and functions in the absence of exogenous benzodiazepines. I hope that makes sense.

Yes, it matters which neurons.

Peripheral (AKA mitochondrial) benzodiazepine receptors (found in non-neuronal tissue) are weird creatures. Here's an older but coherent review. Section VI and VIII would be good places to start. The introduction to this article is also a nice overview.

Do they have HPA axis effects and mood/anxiety effects? Probably - see that article's introduction for an overview. Surely someone on here has a special interest in PBRs???

Sorry for all the links, but I (personally) really hate it when people read things to me or the equivalent, and I won't state things as well as the authors did. And these would be wicked long quotes. Hence the links.

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having read your responses and taken a gander at the supplied links, i am in debt to you madhatter, scholarly members.

this must be the place, as there is nowhere else that the uninitiated could find an answer to a yeoman's inquisitiveness.

yabba-GABA-do

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