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;) Recent studies of medication for Parkinson's disease cites an unusual addicition to gambling.  Many of the patients racked up sizable debts despite never gambling before, or gambling after being removed from the med.  Can we use that excuse?
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;) Recent studies of medication for Parkinson's disease cites an unusual addicition to gambling.  Many of the patients racked up sizable debts despite never gambling before, or gambling after being removed from the med.  Can we use that excuse?

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Which Parkinson's drugs would those be? And where did you find this?

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here's one link from scientific american:

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa...EE183414B7F0000

so far the only drug name i could find listed was Meripax.  apparently not all of them became fixated on gambling.  some were fixated on eating, shopping and sex.  heh, heh.  but  (from at least one article i read based on mayo clinic info) the effects went away after the drugs were removed.  it also seems it was a rather small amount of people.  (i think it stated 11)

here is a link to the google news search i did:

http://news.google.com/news?num=100&hl=en&...8859-1&filter=0

i'll post more info when i find more.

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Guest Guest_stipple_*

My father in law had parkinson's and the drugs he took seemed to be not much better than the desease,being a doctor himself he did the worst thing he could do,he went on line and wrote himself scripts for all kinds of drugs to see if they would help.It was so sad to see such a brilliant mind loose it.They seem to be so far away from helping parkinsons because the big money is in other drugs.the only gambling i saw him do was in Tahoe,he was so brilliant even with the desease that he consistantly won at poker.It is hard to tell if the drugs create the binges or just the pain .

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If dopamine plays as large a part in experiencing pleasure as I've been told, then I think that it would intensify anything that a person gets a big kick out of, anything that has "rewards" for them--gambling, sex, sky-diving, petting a cat, making hats, origami, computer games, whatever.

The main difference, I think, would be that you're much less likely to get in trouble petting a cat, making hats, or folding paper than you are with gambling and sex.

Alas! Sex is also much more fun than making hats, And the rewards sex can give. . .Alas!

tom

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The parkinson's drugs have to be part of the whole coctail of pain meds etc......My stepfather had a pain killer implant drip that maybe cut some pain but might have put him in the place of experimenting with drugs,as a doctor himself his doctor friends helped him and hindered him too by being able to not research thru the drug company's hype.

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I saw a story about this in the New York Times.  The study was done at the Mayo clinic.  Some of the stories really sounded bad.  The manufacturer of Mirapex had to change the prescribing information to include compulsive activities.  I am just glad it stops after discontinuing the medicine.

Katie ;)

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here's one link from scientific american:

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?chanID=sa...EE183414B7F0000

so far the only drug name i could find listed was Meripax.  apparently not all of them became fixated on gambling.  some were fixated on eating, shopping and sex.  heh, heh.  but  (from at least one article i read based on mayo clinic info) the effects went away after the drugs were removed.  it also seems it was a rather small amount of people.  (i think it stated 11)

here is a link to the google news search i did:

http://news.google.com/news?num=100&hl=en&...8859-1&filter=0

i'll post more info when i find more.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

This kind of makes sense, given that Mirapex is DA agonist and that Hyperdopaminergic Mutant Mice Have Higher "Wanting" But Not "Liking" for Sweet Rewards.

Speaking of studies, here's the original one from the Mayo Clinic. At first it looked like nothing but Mirapex with a few people taking levodopa on the side, but one guy was taking ropinirole. Interestingly, the study says that they reviewed eleven patients, but only give details on ten of them.

I hope they catch that.

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If dopamine plays as large a part in experiencing pleasure as I've been told, then I think that it would intensify anything that a person gets a big kick out of, anything that has "rewards" for them--gambling, sex, sky-diving, petting a cat, making hats, origami, computer games, whatever.

The main difference, I think, would be that you're much less likely to get in trouble petting a cat, making hats, or folding paper than you are with gambling and sex.

Alas! Sex is also much more fun than making hats, And the rewards sex can give. . .Alas!

tom

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I'm pretty sure this has nothing to do with pleasure/reward stuff. 

Executive functioning disorders are symptomatic of many kinds of brain damage, be it traumatic or organic.  What we may be seeing here is the medications causing partial recovery from the cognitive symptoms of Alzheimers but leaving executive functioning problems in place.  I don't believe any causal claims can be made from these observations. 

Ironicly, Mirapex hits many of the same receptors thought to play a roll in ADD.  Were it a more potent DA antagonist it could be an effective ADD treatment.

I'd look some stuff up but my anxiety has been too horrid to take any stims the last few days so I'm stuck in stupid benzo haze mode.

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I'm pretty sure this has nothing to do with pleasure/reward stuff. 

Executive functioning disorders are symptomatic of many kinds of brain damage, be it traumatic or organic.  What we may be seeing here is the medications causing partial recovery from the cognitive symptoms of Alzheimers but leaving executive functioning problems in place.  I don't believe any causal claims can be made from these observations. 

Ironicly, Mirapex hits many of the same receptors thought to play a roll in ADD.  Were it a more potent DA antagonist it could be an effective ADD treatment.

I'd look some stuff up but my anxiety has been too horrid to take any stims the last few days so I'm stuck in stupid benzo haze mode.

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VelvetElvis, this does have to do with pleasure/reward stuff.

Katie ;)

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Actually, dopamine is more of a desire chemical then a pleasure chemical. It's in the rat study I posted. They used to think it was because dopamine-deficient mice, who don't eat unless a scientist force-feeds them, which was assumed to be because they didn't like it. This looked like pretty solid evidence for the "dopamine is the neurotransmitter of pleasure" school of thought until 1989, when Dr. Kent Berridge showed that rats that whose dopamine systems were lesioned to oblivion still liked eating when they were force-fed something sweet. He also contributed to the hyperdopaminergic rat study I linked to previously. Oh, and pleasure is increasingly seen as more of an opioid and GABA system thing.

StrungOutOnLife

*who had no idea GABA was involved, either*

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