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Different names for the same drug


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Having done some research on mood stabilazers before a pdoc appointment, I was quite taken a back when the doc prescribes Epival, I thought what the hell, I've never heard of this - whats going on, Then the pharmacist says to me - I take it this is for pain - Told him no mood stabilizer all the way home I thought did I get a bum rap here or what - I was so upset that night I didnt google it for fear of what I might discover,

Low and behold the first hit said Epival(Canada) known in the U.S. as depakote well WTF I know all about depakote.

And before the doc prescribes Cipralex, then he tells me you might know it as lexapro.

What is up with these drug companies and their different naming of the same drug! Why O' Why do they do this.

My wife thinks its because the name in an other language may have some other meaning - not an appropiate word or something like that.

Canada and the U.S. dont have any different linguistical differences or britain, Austrailia for that matter. Just one of my stupid musings.

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Reco, it could also be that the name is in use or has been copyrighted in the other country. We can call it Lexapro, but maybe in Canada there is a golf ball with that trademarked name, or a chain of convenience stores. It isn't just a language issue---it gets into copyrights.

olga

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Ok, you've mentioned two of the three different kinds of IP protection, and you missed the one that actually applies in cases like this: trademarks (not that I really blame anyone, since the entire system is an enormous, incomprehensible mess, prone to abuse, especially copyright and patents).

And if you don't think there's any language difference between the different English-speaking countries, you must never have talked to or read anything by anyone from a different country. Have someone from the US and someone from the UK start talking to each other about their pants and their fannies for instant amusement.

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One other reason can be that a drug company will use one name for a certain use, like psychiatric illness, and another name for others. One company in the US has done that with a smoking cessation drug. I guess they figure people who are crazy enough to smoke, don't want to be considered REALLY crazy. ;)

a.m.

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One other reason can be that a drug company will use one name for a certain use, like psychiatric illness, and another name for others.

I assume you're talking about Wellbutrin/Zyban, and that brings up a good point. Another one is Prozac/Sarafem (which is what they call it when marketing it for PMDD).

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Guest here's an idea!

Lets rename milk - You guys in the good ole U.S.A refer to it as milk - Up here in Canada we'll call it__________ Add your suggestion here.

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Lets rename milk - You guys in the good ole U.S.A refer to it as milk - Up here in Canada we'll call it__________ Add your suggestion here.

In the UK, what you know as 'milk' is marketed under the brand name 'Lactamil'. 'Milk' is actually the tradename for an over the counter laxative here. We find it faintly amusing that you Murcans take Milk in coffee ;)

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  • 1 month later...

Lets rename milk - You guys in the good ole U.S.A refer to it as milk - Up here in Canada we'll call it__________ Add your suggestion here.

If you're in Canada then maybe you could call it, "costs 75% less and works just as well but when imported across the border with the US becomes dangerous, poisonous or otherwise unfit for consumption."

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