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Has anyone had allergy testing done?


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What do they do? I know the test results aren't totally accurate but I can't figure out what it could be.... I haven't tried eliminating dairy, but I eat dairy every day, and its not something I eat every day, or if it is, not enough every day to bug me. and I eat a LOT of dairy EVERY day. I don't know. I'm just wondering if Allergy testing could maybe give me guidance as to what I should try eliminating. Advice?

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What do they do? I know the test results aren't totally accurate but I can't figure out what it could be.... I

Usually an allergist would start with a skin test [Mayo Clinic link] to check for responses to common environmental allergens. That might not pick up specific food allergies.

I've had it done once, but none of the agents tested positive - including the histamine positive control.

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I know its caused by food. because after I eat I get itching, sometimes a rash, sometimes tingling in the mouth, Sometimes a while after I eat I get short of breath, nasal congestion, and occasionally wheezing, and my blood pressure often plummets after I eat and I get lightheaded and dizzy.

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i was just tested, and they didn't run tests for foods or medications, it was things like trees, molds, pets, bugs (apparently people can be allergic to cockroaches). i'm sure they w/could do a specific test if there were reason to believe there were food allergies present.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I originally had allergy testing done fall 2004. I tested positive for basically all of the common plants, grasses, trees in the area. Plus pennicillin, chocolate, yeast, cinnamon and cola. I've been doing allergy shots since then and the last time I was tested, the only thing that really was a strong reaction, was the histamine. So I know they've helped--not to mention I've only been on antibiotics a handful of times since starting them.

So they can test for food allergies. But I'm not so sure if allergy shots can help food allergies? I dunno. Also I think the tests aren't very accurate when it comes to food. After I got the results, the dr had me cut all of those things out of my diet for 3 months. After 3 months he had me add 1 back for a month and see if I had problems, etc.

But I want to know also, how do you know it's food?

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i was just tested, and they didn't run tests for foods or medications, it was things like trees, molds, pets, bugs (apparently people can be allergic to cockroaches). i'm sure they w/could do a specific test if there were reason to believe there were food allergies present.

Yep, it's true. People with asthma can be triggered by roaches but I think it has to be a really bad infestation.

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If you really believe it's food, the best thing to do the next time it happens is to identify everything that you ate that day including (perhaps especially) all spices and additives. Remove all from your diet for about a month, then add each back individually about a week apart. More or less, this is what an allergist will have you do. I've been thru all the tests including food. Tested highly positive on like 90%. As previously said, for foods, the doc removes them from your diet and then reintroduces them to see which are real problems. Chicken was my worst, but ironically I was fine with eggs. Fast forward many years, most foods aren't a significant problem including chicken. The body changes over time.

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If you really think it's caused by something you eat, you should be keeping a food journal of everything you eat and when you eat it. Then you can look at what you ate and what time it was relative to when you feel that way and narrow it down relatively quickly. I've had allergy testing done for the "regular" stuff like plants and animals and whatnot, and I've also had it done for various foods. It was all negative the first time, and it was very suspiciously inconclusive the second time (lots of stuff produced a half-assed reaction and was itchy, but not enough so that they counted it as a true reaction; to be fair, I have dermatographia, and scratching or poking my skin too much makes raised bumps like that show up anyway, regardless of allergens being present or not). The only thing that finally sorted out what was bothering me or not was diligently keeping a food journal for a few weeks, then eliminating all of the suspicious things. It's kind of a pain to do, but I consistently feel much better than I did before going through all that.

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Tested highly positive on like 90%. As previously said, for foods, the doc removes them from your diet and then reintroduces them to see which are real problems. Chicken was my worst, but ironically I was fine with eggs. Fast forward many years, most foods aren't a significant problem including chicken. The body changes over time.

I wonder... Was it any and all chicken, or just some chicken? I have a friend who can eat burgers at McDonald's but gets very, very sick if he has anything from Burger King. He also has some antibiotic allergies. He thinks that maybe McDonald's cows get fed a different antibiotic than Burger King cows. (Of course I suppose it could be some other food additive present in Burger King stuff but not McDonald's stuff...)

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Tested highly positive on like 90%. As previously said, for foods, the doc removes them from your diet and then reintroduces them to see which are real problems. Chicken was my worst, but ironically I was fine with eggs. Fast forward many years, most foods aren't a significant problem including chicken. The body changes over time.

I wonder... Was it any and all chicken, or just some chicken? I have a friend who can eat burgers at McDonald's but gets very, very sick if he has anything from Burger King. He also has some antibiotic allergies. He thinks that maybe McDonald's cows get fed a different antibiotic than Burger King cows. (Of course I suppose it could be some other food additive present in Burger King stuff but not McDonald's stuff...)

Home cooked, verified spices were their own issue. It definitely was the chicken. Beef was an issue, too, just not as bad. Pork, not too bad. Turkey was a-ok. A number of spices were problematic, some still are. Raw ginger will cause anaphalaxis - hello epi-pen. Dairy was a big congestion factor. I could go on. I basically grew up believing that when you ate, food pressed on your lungs making it hard to breath. Yeh, I know, weird, but when it always was that way from the time you started eating, you believe it's like that for a normal reason. I've either grown out of most of the food allergies or they aren't a big problem except ginger. Unfortunately, animals still give me hives and make me asthmatic. More or less, I can deal with everything else. TMI? Yes, probably.

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Oh, fun! So yeah, what other people said-- scratch test. They'll probably draw a kind-of spreadsheet looking series of boxes on your arm or back, depending on how many exposures they're giving you. If you're ticklish, this absolutely SUCKS (even though you'll giggle a lot, haha)

Testing for food alergies can be a real bitch, hence the need for keeping a food diary.

The reason it's SUCH a bitch is because of the chemical breakdown that happens when we ingest food. I'm HUGELY allergic to apples, but on the allergy test, apples come up negative. If you're allergic to a protein, etc. in something from the food as it is in its natural form, then the scratch test should more than likely suffice. If you're getting hives on your lips and throat quite soon after eating it, then it's more likely it'll come up on the scratch test because it's a result of direct contact. The problem occurs when you're allergic to a byproduct or the broken down version of a food. If you get the symptoms quite some time after you've ingested the food, this is more likely and it might not show in a scratch test.

Best of luck to you ;) Allergies are a pain in the arse! (I'm allergic to more things than I can count on my fingers and toes)

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Home cooked, verified spices were their own issue. It definitely was the chicken. Beef was an issue, too, just not as bad. Pork, not too bad. Turkey was a-ok. A number of spices were problematic, some still are. Raw ginger will cause anaphalaxis - hello epi-pen. Dairy was a big congestion factor. I could go on. I basically grew up believing that when you ate, food pressed on your lungs making it hard to breath. Yeh, I know, weird, but when it always was that way from the time you started eating, you believe it's like that for a normal reason. I've either grown out of most of the food allergies or they aren't a big problem except ginger. Unfortunately, animals still give me hives and make me asthmatic. More or less, I can deal with everything else. TMI? Yes, probably.

I'm so sorry about the ginger. Epi-pens can come in handy...

Well, technically, it still could've been an antibiotic allergy (the chicken, I mean)--unless you bought a free-range, not drugged-up chicken. Or it could've been some other "unnatural" additive in the fated chicken's diet...

But, hey, it is possible to be allergic to "unadulterated" foods. If that's the case with you, then I feel really bad for you!

[Amidst your immunological bad luck, though, you're lucky you're not allergic to corn (or soy)... That stuff is in everything!]

Anyway, best of luck with your diet, and may your immune system remain unchallenged...

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Well, technically, it still could've been an antibiotic allergy (the chicken, I mean)--unless you bought a free-range, not drugged-up chicken. Or it could've been some other "unnatural" additive in the fated chicken's diet...

But, hey, it is possible to be allergic to "unadulterated" foods. If that's the case with you, then I feel really bad for you!

[Amidst your immunological bad luck, though, you're lucky you're not allergic to corn (or soy)... That stuff is in everything!]

Anyway, best of luck with your diet, and may your immune system remain unchallenged...

Where I'm lucky is that I have grown out of most all of the food allergies. Yes, it was unadulterated foods, not additives. We checked that, too. And, yep, some of the additives were a problem as well. Corn was on the list, btw. For a while my diet was pretty much just rice, turkey and certain veggies and fruit. Real restricted. It sucked. Then we added in and figured out what didn't cause too much of a problem. Breathing normally was a nice reward, but as a teen, I wanted a regular diet, too. I did get half of one. Life has always been trade offs.

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  • 2 months later...
Guest raederle

What do they do? I know the test results aren't totally accurate but I can't figure out what it could be.... I haven't tried eliminating dairy, but I eat dairy every day, and its not something I eat every day, or if it is, not enough every day to bug me. and I eat a LOT of dairy EVERY day. I don't know. I'm just wondering if Allergy testing could maybe give me guidance as to what I should try eliminating. Advice?

I had blood work done a year ago, thinking I was going to be told that I was allergic to cats and dogs, maybe dust. Instead, the blood work came back and I have a "mild" allergy to milk. Mild means that I react 38-48 hours after consuming it. However, after eliminating milk, butter, and cheese, the reaction occurs much more quickly now, 12 with symptoms subsiding after 24-36 hours. Some people react immediately, some as much as 48 hours after eating. I used to have some sort of dairy several times a week, but reacted differently. Sometimes-watery eyes, itchy nose/skin, runny nose, headache, migraine, upset stomach, weird gastrointestinal issues. No more dairy, no more symptoms for me.

Even if a standard allergy test doesn't show a true allergy, you may still be sensitive to certain foods. My husband is sensitive to yeast (bakers and brewers), wheat (not gluten), milk (not cheese), egg yolks (not whites), and kidney beans. He had a RAST done with lots and lots of little vials of blood drawn. Mine was a simpler test, only too two vials, but mine only tested true allergies, not sensitivities.

If you don't want to go through testing, I will echo what has been mentioned previously, keep an extremely accurate food diary, including product name. It may take a lot of investigative work on your part to determine what you are allergic to, for example, I can't eat most chicken nuggets at restaurants, there is milk in the breading. One of my favorite supermarket sausages has unlisted dairy in it, I react every time I eat it. Manufacturers/distributors in the US are not required to list an ingredient if it is less than 2% of the overall makeup of the product. Many list them anyway, knowing that it helps us not eat what we are allergic or sensitive to.

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I had the testing done about 20 years ago after I broke out in hives so bad I even had them on the bottom of my feet. My skin test showed no allergies, but several "intolerances". The biggies were wheat, eggs and tomatoes. Since I was poor I had been living on fried egg and tomato sandwiches.

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