Jump to content
CrazyBoards.org

Recommended Posts

I have mild depression, mild OCD, and moderate anxiety, and my mom and my therapist both told me at different times that they thought I should consider medication. So, I went and saw my doctor the other day.

She's not so keen on medication. She said that she could see me using it to "kick start" things, but only if I actively wanted to. (That's typical though, she doesn't like using meds unless it's really going to make a difference). Instead of medication, she thinks that daily exercise in the morning is the key. She told me to read this book, Spark by John Ratey that's all about how exercise is good for both physical and mental health...

So now I'm kind of stuck. Do I do the exercise and forgo the meds? Do I take the meds and do the exercise?

I have an appointment with my doc in 2 weeks to check on things...

Any advice?

Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did you see a pdoc or a gp?

If it was a gp, then I would recommend seeing a pdoc as a second opinion.

Just my personal opinion though. Exercise is good as an adjunct in many cases especially if things are mild, but if your therapist is recommending medication (especially if you're having problems w/OCD) then I'd get a second opinion.

Keep in mind I'm no doctor. This is only my personal opinion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am absolutely in favor of meds, and I think they can do remarkable things. Having said that, maybe you should try what your doctor is suggesting.

I don't mean a leisurely 15-minute stroll, but some real vigorous exercise. Swimming, or jogging or something else that's aerobic. I don't think for a second that this will help OCD, but I do feel that regular exercise can be a help with depression. I have friends with GAD who feel that exercise helps them to deal with their MI, particularly yoga, pilates and similar types of exercise.

If your depression is mild and your anxiety is moderate, it's certainly worth trying. You could really work at it for two weeks, keep a log of how you feel each day, and go back to the doctor with your report. If exercise hasn't helped your symptoms, then maybe other avenues should be tried.

I agree with Maddy that a pdoc is the one to consult about this, but if your parents insist that the GP/pediatrician is the one to make the decision....well, I'm not sure what options you have.

It won't hurt to try exercising, assuming that you are in good health and can handle it. Let us know what you decide and how you are doing. I would be interested in following your progress.

olga

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have mild depression, mild OCD, and moderate anxiety, and my mom and my therapist both told me at different times that they thought I should consider medication. So, I went and saw my doctor the other day.

She's not so keen on medication. She said that she could see me using it to "kick start" things, but only if I actively wanted to.

Any advice?

Thanks.

Yay for your Doctor. Sounds like she's a good Doctor better listen to her. I've been flamed for saying this, but I agree with Drs that want to exhaust every other method first. At least with this Dr you will know you really need a med if she prescribes it. Too many Dr's and patients go for a quick fix with power drugs without first getting to other possible root causes. As far as exercise goes I can tell you it is the greatest for depression. I am 60 and it has been a great help in the fight. It's even been useful for recovery from drugs gone wrong (older types) My only problem is I've got muscles on my muscles from years of bike riding swimming and jogging and now that I'm aging I find muscle more of a hindrance than help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

^ That's true. Since she gave me a prescription, obviously there is some need...The question is how great it is.

Olga - I'm planning on trying the exercise thing for the 2 weeks until my appointment and see how that goes. I already track my levels of depression, OCD and anxiety in my journal that I write in everyday. I rank them as low, medium, or high. I've been doing this maybe 3 or 4 weeks now, so it's enough to see a trend already.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So now I'm kind of stuck. Do I do the exercise and forgo the meds? Do I take the meds and do the exercise?

Take the meds and start doing the exercise.

If your problems include ADHD or SAD, exercise should go a long way toward helping you need a minimal amount of medication. And less medicine often means less risk of side effects.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

exercise is sooooo important, and i wish wish wish like crazy i'd had a gp like yours when i was a teenager who told me to exercise instead of feeding me ADs, that just messed me up rather than helped me.

turns out i'm one of those lucky one's that get suicidal thoughts, mood swings etc as a side effect to medication. i did have a pretty severe case of depression when it first got diagnosed, but it also got a whole lot worse, in some regards, after i started the meds. no one warned me that as a teen so i didn't realise it was the meds, but now knowing what i know i wish they'd kept me off the awful things, or at least had a specialist giving them to me that explained to me all the risks and what to look out for. i mean, teenage brains aren't even fully grown yet, they should be careful what they put in there!

but by no means am i anti-med! not at all. they are really necessary and important for many people, and 10 years later i am still on the quest to find one that works for me. i would just highly recommend to anyone to start a serious exercise regime before giving meds a go (unless they are at crisis point). exercise has really made a big difference for me and i've gone from somebody who hated the thought of it, to hating going without (mind you, it took about 3 months for me to see any improvement on moods). you may find you still need meds but at least maybe not as much, which your body will thank you for.

so if you feel like you can manage your depression/ocd/anxiety until you see if exercise helps then great. if not, maddy's suggestion to go to a pdoc is gold! i really don't trust gp's with psych meds. i have a really great gp these days (different to the one i had as a teen) but even she couldn't pick up on the fact i was having weird reactions to meds, as opposed to symptoms of my illness - it's a really fine line. a year and a half later i went to a pdoc who took one look at me and said 'you're not depressed, you've just been od-ing on luvox for months!'

go the exercise!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You're not Tom Cruise in disguise, are you? Forgive my bluntness, but I think that's a load of bs that exercise INSTEAD of meds would work. It certainly, *absolutely* could help in addition to the meds; a good lifestyle of exercise and eating right, getting enough sleep, all of that can help the meds do their job, instead of a person just sitting around, waiting for the chemical relief alone. And trust me, if you begin to sink deeper into depression (I don't know if you've experienced this?) exercise is the LAST thing you'd even consider. Kick-starting is a good idea, but you may need more maintenance that that.

Meds aren't evil, and I would be leary of a dr who "read a book" and now wants to follow that train of thought. Anyone could write a book, it doesn't mean it's an effective way of treatment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My problems don't include SAD or ADHD...As I said, I have mild depression, mild OCD, and moderate anxiety.

Rabbit - My doctor has always been cautious about prescribing meds, so it's not as if this book changed her. She always wants to try more natural things first. And she told me that I should try the exercise first, but she wouldn't stop me from taking the meds (she did give me a prescription). I also read the book, at my doctor's suggestion...And I will say that the results found in studies that were cited in the book are pretty impressive. Of course, that's not to say that I actually have the motivation to do daily exercise which is what is said to work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just for the record, I'm rarely impressed by studies. They're too easily skewed to support whatever fact you're trying to make. I'm sure they cited all the positive studies, but that immediately makes me wonder about negative/non-responsive studies that they have conveniently left out.

Okay, I do tend to be a little pessimistic.

And I do the most exercise on an exercise bike while watching tv. Er, SpongeBob. CNN is too depressing, I find I tend to slow down in accordance to the intensity of the story-of-the-moment. But doing a few miles makes me feel better physically, and mentally I feel better knowing I did something good for my body.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think I'd go a little nuts walking (no pun intended), and yes, I have ankle problems too, they seem to be a bit delicate, in fact I just twisted my ankle slightly yesterday trying to avoid being run down by my dog. The bike is gentle on the ankles, gives the legs/rear a good workout, but (heh heh) I can feel lazy and know I'm sitting while I exercise.

They're too easily skewed to support whatever fact you're trying to make

God almighty, the word I was looking for was "conclusion". It really upsets me that my memory has been so impaired with all these damn meds that keep me from driving into a concrete pillar. Argh.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My problems don't include SAD or ADHD...As I said, I have mild depression, mild OCD, and moderate anxiety.

I can't speak to the OCD, but for mild depression and moderate anxiety, I'd think that the triad of regular moderate exercise, a complete balanced diet, and a good sleep regimen (even they seem near impossible for lazy workaholic me) provide the best bang for your buck.

And still, anything that reduces the severity of even one of the illnesses should reduce the medication side of the equation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm in your Doctor's camp - and Earthling's! - on this.

Don't even think about meds until you tried at least the exercise AND diet changes. Look closely at what you eat. Check some nutrition sites etc.

I've got a few issues with Dr. Amen's approach but I think there is some information about diet on his or probably other mental health sites.

I truly think a good talk therapist would help you. (I thought you had one.)

If you really feel you are starting to go down hill or you've tried non med interventions and you still feel your problems are seriously interfering and won't change, then consider meds.

Really, many people find the right med a "miracle"! It could work out that way for you. But way too many also seem to use meds to sort of justify themselves. "I'm so screwed up I NEED meds." And that changes the way you look at yourself for the worse.

(PLEASE, people, don't mis-interpret this! I KNOW there is also a group who truly DO NEED meds. I am not trying to infer anything about you. But "SDRL" is in HS. Problems are - can be - 'normal'. Nothing I've seen in her posts indicate she's out of control or in danger. It really appears to me that she needs help 'working through' things that easing them away with meds.)

But, that said, "SDRL", you are the one who knows (more or less! ;) ) how you feel. See how this stuff works for you. See that you are exercising, eating AND sleeping well. Do everything you can with those things. See if you can find a good tdoc if you don't have one. (I'll personally push for psychotherapist in the "object relations" school, because I FINALLY feel like I'm beginning to see things that would have been very helpful when I was your age. I just don't relate to "Behavioral" therapies. - But that's personal and may not be appropriate for your outlook. It's also very session - and therefore cost - intensive. And maybe it's just that I'm finally 'ready' but I don't think so. I wish I could turn back the clock and all the $$ and time spent with psychologists, Pdocs, meds etc. to have my current tdoc from the beginning.

So just my suggestion that you check out the possibility if you can budget it.

Sorry for all the personal shit. I mean it as a reflection to you as 'options'.

Hope you're OK.

Best regards

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(PLEASE, people, don't mis-interpret this! I KNOW there is also a group who truly DO NEED meds. I am not trying to infer anything about you. But "SDRL" is in HS. Problems are - can be - 'normal'. Nothing I've seen in her posts indicate she's out of control or in danger. It really appears to me that she needs help 'working through' things that easing them away with meds.)

While no one would disagree that normal teen problems are normal for teenagers in high school, way too many real issues end up never being worked through because well-meaning adults like you assume that as long as the kid isn't dressed in black and toting a rifle to school her problems can't be all that bad. All she has to do is keep breathing and everything will be fine.

Back in the real world, even mild depression over the long haul can screw up a person's life. Incomplete education, failed careers, poor socialization, it all can stack up until the pile is too high to crawl out from under later in life.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steve - I do have a therapist. And it's doing good...But even she thinks that meds could be extremely helpful. Just two weeks ago she said that she was going to contact my doctor because of that. I will try the exercise...But if things don't improve by the time I see my doc again...I'm going to try the meds.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...