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Raquin

What books are you currently reading?

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The Cow In The Parking Lot, A Zen Approach To Overcoming Anger. 

Life changing and something I actually look forward to continuing without grudge. 

I’m sure with my memory I’ll have to read it many times over though. 

Edited by DammitJanet

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The Secret History by Donna Tartt. This is my fourth time reading it, it’s one of my favorite books, sort of a bizarre series of events regarding a freshmen group of friends at college. 

 

Edited by Rabbit37

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Walking to Martha's Vineyard by Franz Wright. poetry collection about mental illness, seeing beauty in the world, and daddy issues. he was bipolar and experienced psychosis. i like it so far.

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12 minutes ago, echolocation said:

Walking to Martha's Vineyard by Franz Wright. poetry collection about mental illness, seeing beauty in the world, and daddy issues. he was bipolar and experienced psychosis. i like it so far.

I’ll have to check this one out as soon as I get through another self help book or two.

Sounds good. 

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4 hours ago, Rabbit37 said:

The Secret History by Donna Tartt. This is my fourth time reading it, it’s one of my favorite books, sort of a bizarre series of events regarding a freshmen group of friends at college. 

 

From the title, at first I thought the book was about the Deep State or something.

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I'm trying to find a book I don't need to concentrate to hard on or short stories. Just ordered 'The complete works of Saki'.  Now I kind of want to order goosebumps books or something along those lines. 

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@Raspberry roald dahl, aside from being a terrific children's author, wrote plenty of unsettling thriller/suspense type short stories. you mentioned goosebumps so i thought i'd mention it as a grown-up alternative! steven king short stories are entertaining as well, but i found them more the kind where if you skim a bit, you don't miss too much. i'm quite fond of rereading kids' series, though. they're easy and fun. :-)

i don't know if you like graphic novels, but they're nice if you don't have a lot of concentration. i read a lot of them in a period where i didn't read many novels.

@DammitJanet the nice thing about poetry is that it's a quick read, unless you do a lot of analysis. maybe a stopover between self-help books?

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I'm reading Furiously Happy, it's good. I do like her as a person and I like her philosophy of life and her hobbies but the comedy is kind of repetitive so I would like if someone could just earmark the chapters about mental health for me so I could skip the rest heh, ah well it's a quick read and the chapters are short and I do probably laugh out loud once every 2 chapters so what am I being so fussy for?

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19 hours ago, echolocation said:

@Raspberry roald dahl, aside from being a terrific children's author, wrote plenty of unsettling thriller/suspense type short stories. you mentioned goosebumps so i thought i'd mention it as a grown-up alternative! steven king short stories are entertaining as well, but i found them more the kind where if you skim a bit, you don't miss too much. i'm quite fond of rereading kids' series, though. they're easy and fun. :-)

I think a while back I read an adult Roald Dahl story where a woman kills her husband with a leg of lamb. He also wrote some pretty odd poetry. I love Steven king in my teens but haven't read anything by him in years.

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On 27/09/2018 at 4:12 PM, Raspberry said:

I think a while back I read an adult Roald Dahl story where a woman kills her husband with a leg of lamb. He also wrote some pretty odd poetry. I love Steven king in my teens but haven't read anything by him in years.

I remember reading that. She kills her husband with a frozen leg of lamb and then cooks it and feeds the evidence to the police when they turn up. The perfect crime! There was also a short story which involved gambling and cutting off fingers. I loved reading Roald Dahl books as a kid but not all his stories are for children.

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4 minutes ago, Fluent In Silence said:

I remember reading that. She kills her husband with a frozen leg of lamb and then cooks it and feeds the evidence to the police when they turn up. The perfect crime! There was also a short story which involved gambling and cutting off fingers. I loved reading Roald Dahl books as a kid but not all his stories are for children.

I think I've seen an episode of the Alfred Hitchcock TV show with that story.

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17 minutes ago, Fluent In Silence said:

I remember reading that. She kills her husband with a frozen leg of lamb and then cooks it and feeds the evidence to the police when they turn up. The perfect crime! There was also a short story which involved gambling and cutting off fingers. I loved reading Roald Dahl books as a kid but not all his stories are for children.

Yep that's the one. I vaguely remember it coming free with something. Some of his poems aren't either suitable for kids either. There is one in revolting rhymes called "physical education". Pretty sure teachers aren't supposed to behave like that. I definitely think regressing into childhood literature is the way to go. I loved to read as a kid. I rarely do it now. 

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Lawrence in Arabia by Scott Anderson. “War, Deceit, Imperial Folly and the making of the Modern Middle East.”  Highly engaging account of events leading up to WWI in Europe and the near east. Good read for history buffs or anyone who wants a better understanding of today’s issues.

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Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison. Beautifully written and heartbreaking and rage-inducing.  Also Get it Done When You're Depressed by Julie Fast and John Preston. Nothing I don't already know, but each chapter is a specific tip that it is good to be reminded of when you're in the pit. 

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On 9/26/2018 at 10:03 AM, Rabbit37 said:

The Secret History by Donna Tartt. This is my fourth time reading it, it’s one of my favorite books, sort of a bizarre series of events regarding a freshmen group of friends at college. 

 

That's one of my favorites, too, Rabbit.  I took a summer writing course ages ago at Bennington College, where Tartt went to school and which she loosely used to set The Secret History.  It was around the time the book was published and she gave a reading, which I very much enjoyed.  

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I've been unable to finish reading a book following rounds of ECT, so I've been listening to some a bit at a time.  I greatly enjoyed Patrick deWitt's novel,  French Exit, more than anything I've read (heard) in quite some time.  It's about a bankrupted widowed socialite, her adult son and their cat, who is actually a reincarnation of her dead husband.  Newly homeless, the trio flee New York society for a friend's apartment in Paris.  The socialite exhibits deliciously bizarre behavior and the dialogue kept me chuckling (and gave me good ideas for witty conversational comebacks).  The New Yorker called it, "a miniaturist work of howling nihilism" https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/the-stealth-absurdism-of-patrick-dewitts-french-exit  (A suicide occurs in the story FYI.)

Edited by shesellsseashells
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I read the Bible a lot, along with a whole host of self-help books for OCD/Anxiety...They do help relieve stress in me.

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Homo Deus: A Brief History of Tomorrow by Yuval Noah Hariri. Gawd he has a fascinating brain! A historian who sees beyond the limits of his speciality, and wanders of into philosophy, psychology, neuroscience and predictions about the future based on an understanding of the present. John Gray probably said many of the same things but I think Hariri explains it all better.

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