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Erasing your mental health history...


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I want to erase the tracks of my mental health history.

I feel as though it will create barriers for me in the future. I want it gone. Sorry if this offends any of you folks here. I'm not trying to say everyone should do this or whatever...

I've been off my meds for about four months, no symptoms, and I'm going to try for a year with no symptoms but I want to sweep this all under the rug.

Say, if the stupid legislation makes it so that way a mental health clearance is necessary for purchase of a gun, I don't want to have to explain anything or be red flagged. Also, eventually I want to be able to do like Americorps or PeaceCorps or something and I'm pretty sure you need a clearance for that.

I've had two voluntary hospitalizations and I currently see a therapist at Community Mental Health, but no longer a psychiatrist (no meds).

Is it legal to leave the hospitalizations off of intake records at new places? I have had enough small clinic visits to make it very difficult to compile any medical records as it is...

So...any ideas?

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What has been your payment source for all of this? Cash? Private insurance? Credit cards? Medicaid?

What about prescriptions? Pharmacy databases have a broad reach.

If you have been on a sliding scale fee at a community mental health center, that information is not compiled at any kind of a national level at this time. However, it may be compiled at a state level. You'd have to ask.

As far as the hospitalizations- sometimes you sign a waiver saying you will be fully forthcoming, sometimes you don't. You do yourself and future clinicians - medical and psychiatric - a disservice by leaving that information out. You can always put "Prefer to discuss face to face" in that section.

My understanding, which is very likely plain wrong, is that the volunteer corps you mention both require a psych interview/screening as part of the process for everyone. And any medical history you fill out for them does have to be full and forthcoming. Sometimes they only ask about the last 5 years (or whatever interval they choose.)

Can you "sweep it under the rug" so far that no one could ever find it on an exhaustive background check? I doubt it. Can you "sweep it under the rug" enough that it doesn't show up on your future medical charts? Probably. But I don't know if it's worth it. It might be worth looking into the volunteer corps requirements first.

I don't know what your particular brand of MI has been, but it can be relevant to care in ways you might not anticipate. (Manic-depressive illness is a relative contraindication for prednisone, for example.)

ETA: ah, yes, saw your sig. So you get the idea.

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Mental illness won't necessarily prevent you from getting a clearance. Lying about your psychiatric history (or about anything else) is a big deal, though.

The U.S. government, as far as I can tell (and I've been looking into this recently) is fairly serious about being interested in psych issues only with regards to whether they'll affect security-related issues. This is what I've been able to turn up on the web so far, and my mother spoke with a friend of hers who used to investigate people for security clearances and he did not think it would be a problem either.

Edit: If you have ever had a diagnosed mental disorder in your lifetime, then you cannot legally buy a gun in Michigan even right now. I have friends with mental health issues who have purchased guns there, and it doesn't sound like they do anything in the way of background checks for that.

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Edit: If you have ever had a diagnosed mental disorder in your lifetime, then you cannot legally buy a gun in Michigan even right now. I have friends with mental health issues who have purchased guns there, and it doesn't sound like they do anything in the way of background checks for that.

Michigan law is that you cannot legally purchase a gun (or fire one on a range) if you have had an involuntary hospitalization.

Last year when I was shooting I got into a discussion about that with the RangeMaster.

Thanks for letting me know though, I didn't think it would be a big deal.

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One other consideration is in relation to health and life insurance. Failure to list any history of treatment/illlness constitutes fraud and most every state has criminal penalties for insurance fraud. There are shared industry databases which might contain information on hospitalizations... But certainly if you are ever discovered to have lied on the forms that will be reported, and make getting future insurance difficult.

Both my pdoc and therapist have many government employees with security clearances. Just having a dx is not disqualifying for most positions. The investigators first ask the docs "Is there any reason that Mr. X should not be trusted to have a security clearance?". Only if the doc says Yes, do the ask specific detailed questions about your condition.

a.m.

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I think I was confusing the wording of the concealed carry law with the purchasing firearms law.

Despite that, the lawyer we had in to our firearms class at my martial arts school said yes, you cannot legally purchase a firearm in Michigan if you have been diagnosed with a mental disorder. I believe this had to do with the way that the (non-medical) term "mental defective" gets used in practice, although I'm not certain whether that was the issue and my notes are currently several hundred miles from me, unfortunately.

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I didn't have any problems signing up for Americorps. I'm still waiting on my recommendation letters, though! (Hurry up people, you said you'd write glowing recommendations for me!) Granted, I haven't gone to an interview with a nonprofit yet, but I suspect that most wouldn't care. Around these parts, anyways.

You can get a DEA license if you're diagnosed with a mental disorder, if that tells you anything. And I've known military folks that have been diagnosed and have had security clearance, so no big deal.

I'm not going to get in on the gun debate, but I will tell you that you can do some mean shit with kama. ;) Something to consider.

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I know how you feel. You just have to read it carefully and decide what to say. If it asks you if you have anything that would impair you, well, you can say no-if it doesn't . I recall agonizing over this when i first started working.I also agonized over drug screens. It's a lousy system.some of us get breaks some of us don't. I am just very careful what i put on papers. It never stays private.

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