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Has anyone been helped by T3 (Cytomel)


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I am about at the end of my rope and will try anything to feel better. Cytomel is controversial for use in hypothyroidism, but I would like to give it a try, as I am quite desperate at this point in time.

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I do have hypothryoid and did well on Synthroid for years. Then I was switched to Cytomel due to depression. The Cytomel did nothing for my depression and screwed up my thyroid levels to boot. So now I"m back on Synthroid.

It's worth a shot if you haven't tried it.

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Isolde

your Endo probably told you it was controversial. My pdoc uses it all the time. It is not really controversial at all. if you go to ( [link=http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/"'>http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/" target="_blank]http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/[/link] and read a bit it will help. look up top docs in your state. I have taken cytomel for years. Cytomel is T3. It is perfectly good drug that has been used in Europe for years. Some docs in the USA can be very backward, esp the Endos. Maybe your pdoc will be open to prescribing. I started with 5 mcg am and afternoon. it is a tiny dose and not dangerous at all. don't let them scare you. It is a totally safe drug. Your doc will just monitor your labs the normal way, doing a Tsh, T4, T3. The lab values will tell him how you are doing. Cytomel is a very old drug and has been around for some time.

here is what happens with synthroid. it is supposed to convert to T3 but many times our bodies don't do that. so if you don't covert to T3 very well, you still have symptoms of low thyroid even if your tsh is normal . docs used to prescribe a drug called thyloar, a combo a t3 and t4(synthroid). anyway, if you go to that site and read a bit it will answer some questions.

best to you.

until the last few years women in the USA did not have access to estradial in the gel-or cream forms except vaginal forms) .they had been using that in Europe for 20+ years. women now are using this here with much success.

cytomel is safe and a tiny dose will not hurt you at all. I'm not suggesting you buy it off the Internet, no. Find a doc hopefully one you are already seeing that will try it. it is not scary and all you should feel is a tiny bit better. BTW, the 5mcg,is the tiniest dose available. Most people would take far more.

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Isolde

your Endo probably told you it was controversial. My pdoc uses it all the time. It is not really controversial at all. if you go to ( [link=http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/"'>http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/" target="_blank]http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/[/link] and read a bit it will help. look up top docs in your state. I have taken cytomel for years. Cytomel is T3. It is perfectly good drug that has been used in Europe for years. Some docs in the USA tend to be are very backward, esp the Endos. Maybe your pdoc will be open to prescribing. I started with 5 mcg am and afternoon. it is a tiny dose and not dangerous at all. don't let them scare you. It is a totally safe drug. Your doc will just monitor your labs the normal way, doing a Tsh, T4, T3. The lab values will tell him how you are doing. Cytomel is a very old drug and has been around for some time.

here is what happens with synthroid. it is supposed to convert to T3 but many times our bodies don't do that. so if you don't covert to T3 very well, you still have symptoms of low thyroid even if your tsh is normal . docs used to prescribe a drug called thyloar, a combo a t3 and t4(synthroid). anyway, if you go to that site and read a bit it will answer some questions.

best to you.

until the last few years women in the USA did not have access to estradial in the gel-or cream forms except vaginal forms) .they had been using that in Europe for 20+ years. women now are using this here with much success.

cytomel is safe and a tiny dose will not hurt you at all. I'm not suggesting you buy it off the Internet, no. Find a doc hopefully one you are already seeing that will try it. it is not scary and all you should feel is a tiny bit better. BTW, the 5mcg,is the tiniest dose available. Most people would take far more.

Interesting and I thank you very much for the information. I am going to ask my endo about it tomorrow.

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i had graves diseases (hyperthyroidism) until they destroyed my thyroid with Radioactive Iodine in dec. 2005. i got started on replacement thyroid march 2006 when my TSH hit 54. i had read something about cytomel before hand, and pushed for its inclusion with the synthroid at the first appointment with my endo when we were discussing replacement dosages. i can't imagine how much more flatlined i would have been those next six months without it, because even with it it was really hard getting my TSH back to normal. since then i've had my ups and downs with cytomel. here's one lesson it took me a long time to learn: more cytomel is definitely not better. you want to find a balance of what makes you feel alert/not depressed - but not totally amped up on stress hormones either. my endo and i thought that if i just kept increasing the cytomel my TSH would eventually fall into the perfect range, but in fact it just kept putting me more on edge and out of whack. it is also pretty fast acting. i read in mary shomons 'living well with hypothyroidism' book that it can be 'pretty hard on the adrenals'. i definitely have found this to be true. i convinced my old endocrinologist to let me try compounded cytomel a year and a half ago, and i felt really smooth on that dose. unfortunately my TSH shot back up and she wanted me to switch completely over to 37.5 mcg of regular cytomel. that was a week from hell being on that dose. i just felt ready to erupt every second of the day. i eventually got her to switch me to a regimen of compounded and regular cytomel . . .

. . . long story short (figuring out how to replace a thyroid has been hell) i am on 200 mcg synthroid, 10 mcg compounded cytomel, and about 15 mcg regular cytomel. it works for now. its not perfect and i don't know if my free T3 is too high now, but the 10 mcg compounded provides a fairly nice baseline dose through the course of the day, but i still need the regular cytomel to not slip into feeling really tired and hypo. so to summarize: cytomel can help, but you need to be real particular about how much you're taking, and not over do it.

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i had graves diseases (hyperthyroidism) until they destroyed my thyroid with Radioactive Iodine in dec. 2005. i got started on replacement thyroid march 2006 when my TSH hit 54. i had read something about cytomel before hand, and pushed for its inclusion with the synthroid at the first appointment with my endo when we were discussing replacement dosages. i can't imagine how much more flatlined i would have been those next six months without it, because even with it it was really hard getting my TSH back to normal. since then i've had my ups and downs with cytomel. here's one lesson it took me a long time to learn: more cytomel is definitely not better. you want to find a balance of what makes you feel alert/not depressed - but not totally amped up on stress hormones either. my endo and i thought that if i just kept increasing the cytomel my TSH would eventually fall into the perfect range, but in fact it just kept putting me more on edge and out of whack. it is also pretty fast acting. i read in mary shomons 'living well with hypothyroidism' book that it can be 'pretty hard on the adrenals'. i definitely have found this to be true. i convinced my old endocrinologist to let me try compounded cytomel a year and a half ago, and i felt really smooth on that dose. unfortunately my TSH shot back up and she wanted me to switch completely over to 37.5 mcg of regular cytomel. that was a week from hell being on that dose. i just felt ready to erupt every second of the day. i eventually got her to switch me to a regimen of compounded and regular cytomel . . .

. . . long story short (figuring out how to replace a thyroid has been hell) i am on 200 mcg synthroid, 10 mcg compounded cytomel, and about 15 mcg regular cytomel. it works for now. its not perfect and i don't know if my free T3 is too high now, but the 10 mcg compounded provides a fairly nice baseline dose through the course of the day, but i still need the regular cytomel to not slip into feeling really tired and hypo. so to summarize: cytomel can help, but you need to be real particular about how much you're taking, and not over do it.

Thanks!! I never made it to my endocrinologist. I am waiting to see if using Pristiq does any good before I start messing around with my endocrine system.

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by compounded cytomel , do you mean long acting ( sustained (extended )release ) ? I understand the compounded means your pharmacist makes it- so are you saying a long acting cytomel?

so you are on,

synthroid 200 mcg

10 mcg of long acting cytomel

15 mcg of the short acting cytomel ( do you just take this one time a day? )

thanks so much for your input.

thyroid is so interesting. ( unless you who is ill of course) it is hard to find balance when it goes out.

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  • 9 months later...

have you tried armour thyroid? yes, it's made from actual animal (i think pig) glands and a lot of docs consider it either old school/and/or new age, but it hits multiple thyroid receptors (T3 and T4 and you don't have to refrigerate it like cytomel.) (though i have found it works best sublingual which is kinda grody as it tastes a bit... earthy.)

i'm fond of it.

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