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Troubled

What does goal-directed activity mean anyway

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Increased goal directed activity: Taking on a lot of new projects.

When you combine the increased goal-directed activity with the impulsivity of mania, you get things like: painting the bathroom at 2 am - spontaneously, frenzied cleaning of the entire house, dramatic increase in writing, organizing everything in the closet right now, abrupt road trips, volunteering for major projects at work... these aren't necessarily hedonic / fun activities but they are very goal-oriented. Generally the projects / commitments are more than you would take on normally, because pesky things like sleep or common sense would stand in your way.

Combine impulsivity and increased goal-directed activities and the increased hedonic drive (reward-seeking or pleasure-seeking) of mania, and you have a real mess on your hands.

Does that answer your question?

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Increased goal directed activity: Taking on a lot of new projects.

Wow. I'm always taking on new projects! :)

Finishing them, um, that's usually a different matter. ;)

But one of these days, I'll get around to the less-boring ones!

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Taking on a lot of new projects in excess of baseline.

Thphbbt. ;)

Can I interest you in a large crate of unfinished knitting and metalwork?

Or a few graduate degrees?

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Can I interest you in a large crate of unfinished knitting and metalwork?

Or a few graduate degrees?

Knitting == BORing! ;)

As to metalwork, I've got some gratework finished for installing as rat guards in my house's soffits, which I've been meaning to repair for a couple of years now. And I think I know where I put the thing for melting pewter, but I kind of missed the deadline for *that* casting project... 3 or 4 years ago now. But you never know when that stuff will come in handy!

Besides, I got the graduate degree already. Granted, I started the write-up a bit late, but with a deadline looming, LOTS of caffeine, and a closed door to keep away interruptions, and decent music on the radio, it's amazing how many pages a grad student can type out. It's also amazing how well the amount of caffeine required to complete a project tracks with an advisor's (or supervisor's) stress levels.

Edited by null0trooper
speeling

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My advisors were scared of me, I think.

I completed my defense with 20 minutes to spare, after asking them to move up the date, "because I'm ready now, no need to wait." I hadn't slept more than 8h in 3 days. I did hit the sweet spot of manic quickness, in which I wasn't... quite... a blithering idiot, and charisma (it is a good sign when the panel laughs out loud at your jokes, right?)

Knitting isn't boring if you do it without a pattern, and it's even more interesting if you start to think about the potential for wooly cryptography... it made sense at the time.

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Not long ago, I spent about forty-eight hours straight writing a research paper, cooking elaborate meals, mastering Illustrator and cleaning like a mad-woman. That got me my dx from my pdoc. And a really nice complement from the grad student who looked over my paper.

I think that counts. It was beyond my baseline, that's for sure.

There was also a point where I worked fifty - sixty hours a week, did 17 undergrad credit hours, pulled a 3.6 GPA, and still found time to drink on the weekends. Although it's tough for me to say whether or not that was a hypomanic symptom.

Edited by jenesaisquois

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Yeah, nothing in grad school yet... but I once bought a sewing machine at a yard sale, then patterns and fabric for an entire wardrobe for each of my two toddlers (this was about twenty years ago) because it would save me *so* much money if I could just sew them clothes rather than buy them. Of course, I knew nothing about sewing, so I figured I'd wing it, and finished about four outfits (that's four tops and four bottoms) in two days before crashing. The clothes came out pretty good too for an ancient sewing machine and me being a complete beginner. Here're two of them:

n1037237730_30022466_3110.jpg

I don't think I ever finished the rest of the things I bought, except one or two of the outfits.

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An increase in goal direct behaviors can be benign and subtle as well.

Example:

Becoming the president of your knitting club

Starting three new projects at work

Visiting people you haven't talked to in years

If you did all of the above things within a very short span of time, I'd start looking for hypomania/mania.

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Excellent point, Reborn.

I just like to start out high on the curve for examples, because it seems 'normal' sometimes if there's been untreated illness for a long time.

The sudden calling/emailing long-lost friends is a classic.

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I don't think I ever finished the rest of the things I bought, except one or two of the outfits.

Aw, those are pretty cute! (Not to reinforce behaviors or anything here) And so were the kiddos!

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Increased goal directed activity: Taking on a lot of new projects.

When you combine the increased goal-directed activity with the impulsivity of mania, you get things like: painting the bathroom at 2 am - spontaneously, frenzied cleaning of the entire house, dramatic increase in writing, organizing everything in the closet right now, abrupt road trips, volunteering for major projects at work... these aren't necessarily hedonic / fun activities but they are very goal-oriented. Generally the projects / commitments are more than you would take on normally, because pesky things like sleep or common sense would stand in your way.

Combine impulsivity and increased goal-directed activities and the increased hedonic drive (reward-seeking or pleasure-seeking) of mania, and you have a real mess on your hands.

Does that answer your question?

Not really. Everybody writes increased goal oriented and I want to know what is meant by goal. Is it the opposite of process, e.g. , journey vs destination?

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Pigeon hops into cage and randomly pecks at floor and cage and targets = not goal directed.

Pigeon hops into cage, goes up to target it has learned will cause graduate degree to be dispensed and pecks madly =

Goal directed! and yields several graduate degrees! ;)

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Dont' try to read too much into this.

Baking ten pumpkin pies is "goal oriented". The goal was to make ten pies.

Calling ten friends on the phone is not goal oriented. It is activity that occupies time but has no tangible "real" output or purpose.

Going window shopping, eating lunch out, going to a movie and then eating dinner out, all in one day is activity but not goal oriented.

Dropping $1,000 eating at the five most expensive restauraunts in town all in one day because you are going to become famous as a restaurant critic is goal oriented. The goal is to write food critiques and become famous.

a.m.

Edited by AirMarshall

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hi,

OT but i cant resist - patheral - you did an excellent sewing job & your kids (as toddlers) are absolutely adorable!!! im sure they are now, too.

db

Thanks db... they're obnoxious twenty-somethings now. ;)

On topic... The goal, of course, was to make each of them an entire wardrobe of clothes and save myself a lot of money in the process. The sailor outfits were a homecoming surprise for their dad, who was out to sea at the time I purchased all of the material for this "project" (otherwise it would have never been purchased since he held the purse strings when he was ashore - for good reason). I did end up saving some money sewing clothes in the long run, but not as much as I initially set out to. And I never did sew entire wardrobes since I had two toddlers and an infant at that time, and in the end wound up with four kids. Who had the time for sewing?

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Troubled-

yes i think journey vs destination is a very good way of looking at it. your planned destination is your goal, and your journey to get there is the process.

I'm wondering what the context was that led you to this question. As far as I know, goal directed activity is not limited to mania. It could apply to anyone who is doing something to reach a goal. Around these parts i think it is often used to describe a change- as in increase or decrease- which could correspond to changing moods. ( like a depressed person is likely to decrease, and a manic person is likely to increase.)

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Troubled-

yes i think journey vs destination is a very good way of looking at it. your planned destination is your goal, and your journey to get there is the process.

I'm wondering what the context was that led you to this question.

I don't always understand medical lingo. It sounds as if there is some obsessive compulsive aspects to it. Which makes perfect sense because I suffer that also. ;)

[link=http://www.cnsforum.com/commenteditem/3e71c929-bf81-43f8-afc8-bfb71edb4270/default.aspx" target="_blank]http://www.cnsforum.com/commenteditem/3e71...70/default.aspx[/link]

http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pi...165032703001071

Edit to include links

Edited by Troubled

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I'm sorry you are just making this way to hard.

If you are talking about goal oriented behavior in relation to Bipolar Disorder and Mania, then no. It has nothing to do with OCD.

Someone who is manic may appear "compulsive", but that is merely because the mania is driving him to complete a task.

a.m. sigh.

btw, your links don't work since you were using search engines.

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I'm sorry you are just making this way to hard.

I'm not sure the rest of us have helped much, except to drown you out ;)

Someone who is manic may appear "compulsive", but that is merely because the mania is driving him to complete a task.

Likewise with ADHD, when the "goal" becomes a target of hyperfocus and the feedback stimuli are reinforcing...

So. Baking a pumpkin pie is a goal-oriented activity. A pumpkin pie for dessert is a normal functional goal.

Baking exactly one pumpkin pie, from a specific recipe, stirring precisely 20 times clockwise and 21 times counterclockwise, washing hands 3 times between each step to minimize contamination of ingredients ... can we agree that OCD may be interfering with the activity?

Looking up every possible variation of pumpkin pie because some of these are interesting and you really want a great pumpkin pie and you're online anyway and oh, this looks good too. By the way, when's dinner? Do I smell something burning? Oh, sh!t Do even HAVE a fire extinguisher? Good thing I accidentally doubled the recipe halfway through when I added too much salt. ADHD

Increased goal activity with mania may involve making 10 pumpkin pies, because you CAN! And dammit! there are starving people in Africa who would *love* to have a slice of this pie! The goal is increased beyond reasonable expectation or need, and the approach is hyperbolic in attitude even when workable in execution.

In all three (nonexclusive) cases, heaven help the innocent bystanders.

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