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have your meds affected your teeth?


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My teeth seem to have gotten weaker (can't think of a better way of describing it) over the past few years... I can only think that this might be the cumulative effect of all the meds I've been on (and am on), because it can't be diet related. I make an effort to eat healthily. One of my back molars was chipped after surgery I had last year, but I put that down to the anaesthetist being over-enthusiastic with whatever tubes he shoved down my throat. But in the past few months I've noticed that my teeth are becoming very sensitive to cold, and on Sun night the inner side of another molar just snapped off.

I can't imagine that sitting down and handing the dentist a list of the 20 or whatever meds I've been on will be helpful, but if it could be the case, I'd like to be able to say that I've been on a massive number of drugs which might be contributing to this.

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Hey babe, I've been going to the dentist a lot lately, and my dentist reckons it's "dry mouth syndrome" that does it. Many crazy meds dry your mouth out; less saliva means there's more of a chance for thinning of the tooth enamel, as the process of re-mineralisation of the teeth with calcium is thwarted. That means the teeth become more sensitive to hot/cold and touch. I guess it would make sense that the teeth would get weaker, to the point wear your teeth can fracture and snap, but that could also be due to clenching your jaw, maybe in your sleep, which often fractures teeth.

Is your mouth often dry? Do you have any idea that you clench you jaw?

I use a toothpaste that helps moisturise my teeth, but I don't know how much it works, as it doesn't take long for the seroquel to dry it out again at night.

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Giving your dentist your med history might be helpful, a lot of meds [particularly, though not only, ACs] effect a lot of different things, such as our teeth.

Lamictal in particular can contribute to cavities and periodontal disease [receding gums and worse]. Another thread about it:

Lamictal and receding gums, could they be related?

It can give you dry mouth/change the amount of saliva in your mouth and put your teeth at greater risk for damage.

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Thanks both of you. Yes, dry mouth is definitely an issue for me - actually, I put it down to the lithium and didn't know that lamictal could play a part in it too. (actually, the effects of lamictal on teeth sound pretty awful - this is the first I'd heard of them)

Jaw clenching is a prob too - it was suggested a few years ago that I get a bite plate to wear at night, but I never got round to it. I guess booking an extra-long appointment with the dentist (aagh!) is in order.

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nice timing.

I had a dentist appointment the other morning-- lo and behold, I need 4 appointments. for 6 cavities.

thank dog I have dental coverage under my parents still. I'm not the worst at taking care of my teeth (but during the past depression when showering and feeding myself were hard enough, dental hygiene kinda went out the 2nd story window) but I have such bad dry mouth that I can never keep them clean enough to prevent decay from happening.

I finally told my dentist about the 4 meds (wellbutrin xl, zoloft, lamical, and adderall) that I'm taking, ALL of which give me terrible dry mouth and copped to not paying attention to my teeth during a few months of depression and it at least makes *me* feel a lot better since they at least know that I just blatantly don't care at all.

they also rewrote me a rx for a high fluoride toothpaste (much higher than the sensodyne/drugstore high fluoride kinds) that I am supposed to use every night. it doesn't do much for existing cavities, but if you have weak or 'soft' enamel spots it can actually help repair them so they don't get worse and turn into bigger problems. they can also do a fluoride tray treatment (a bunch of flavored goo in a tray for a minute or two while you drool over a sink. sexy.) while you're there. I'd make sure they about the meds, dry mouth and jaw clenching so they can help fix your existing damage while in the dentist's chair, but also give you the tools to keep things from getting worse.

until your appointment, I'd start using a high fluoride toothpaste and/or mouthwash which can help with trouble spots but also help make your teeth less sensitive-- sensodyne makes a great toothpaste (pro-enamel?) and there are a bunch of mouthwashes now, just check the labels and get one with a high fl. content. the trick with those products though is that you shouldn't eat or drink for 30minutes after using them-- which is the hard part for me since my mouth gets bone dry after 15 or 20, bleh. they also make mouthwash and sprays to use during the day for people with dry mouth (like what sero_junkie was talking about above) to help keep your mouth from getting to the 'I can't lick a freaking stamp' point so quickly. also (I'm sure you know/do this already) make sure you get a lot of sugar-free liquids (I don't know how I'd get by without my polar seltzer and diet orange dry and fresca) every day-- and drink ones with sugar, like juices and non-diet sodas with a straw to avoid the extra sugar residue on your teeth (I need to follow my own advice about the straw thing.)

sorry this was so long, lol, but I'm in the same situation and thought I'd share so hopefully you can prevent having 4 (hour+) appointments over the course of a month like (miserable) me ;)

m

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Before anyone goes out and gets an expensive night guard or bite plate for clenching or grinding, try this or this. One's $40 and the other's about $20. I think there are other OTC things around. I got one from the dentist for $600, custom fitted and made of a hard plastic, but my teeth shifted and it didn't fit right. Go cheap first, they are essentially the same thing. I don't like the one you boil to make fit, I feel like the material is flimsy. The one size one is pretty good.

My only problem with them is that during the day I would still clench/grind. If I am really having a lot of jaw pain, I take 2 advil before I go to bed and when I wake up and sleep with my jaw on a heating pad as best as possible.

I've experienced some teeth sensitivity after using whitening products. I was probably using them too much, as my teeth were supersonic, glowing white. I tried that toothpaste that was supposed to fill in holes in your enamel, have no clue if it worked.

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Biotene offers products for dry mouth: toothpaste, mouthwash, gum, and some sort of lubricant stuff for your gums. It is dentist recommended.

I've used them in the past and my dental visits weren't so bad. Right now, I don't seem to have the dry mouth thing going on.

Another risk factor for people with mood issues and dental problems is that depressed people don't always brush their teeth regularly. I've been there, done that, too.

Oreo ;)

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  • 1 year later...

I've been on Lamictal for 5 years and in that time I've had tooth erosion, gum recession, and have lost 5 teeth despite very good oral hygeine; I use Crest Prohealth products, use a sonic tooth brush, floss at least 3 times a day, have a mouthpiece custom fitted by my dentist that I put in before bed, and I also apply Prevident (a prescription floride gel) at night before bed. It really, really frustrates me that my dental health is deteriorating despite taking good care of my teeth.

My doctor doesn't seem to have any suggestions on a remedy. I'm not a healthcare professional, but I feel strongly that Lamictal affects the absorbtion of certain nutrients that have to do with dental health. I have a separate post asking for advice regarding this.

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