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Inositol -- Wiki say: promising results


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edit...eh, crud. There is a post in this forum on this already. But it's a few years old. Any new experiences?

I happened to run into this interesting vitamin/nutrient, inositol, while researching thermogenic diets. One of the links goes to wiki, here:

Insolitol Wiki

excerpt from under Pyschiatric Conditions section of the article...

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Patients suffering from [link=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinical_depression" target="_blank]clinical depression[/link] generally have decreased levels of inositol in their [link=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerebrospinal_fluid" target="_blank]cerebrospinal fluid[/link].

Myo-inositol has been found in a single double-blind study to significantly reduce the symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) with effectiveness equal to SSRIs and virtually without side-effects.[7] In a double-blind, controlled trial, myo-inositol was superior to fluvoxamine for decreasing the number of panic attacks and had fewer side effects.[8] A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of depressed patients showed that a high dose of inositol (12 grams daily) resulted in significant improvement of symptoms, with no changes noted in liver, kidney, or hematological function.[6]

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Here is the reference[6] link & article from above...

Inositol as a treatment for psychiatric disorders:

Has anyone heard of inositol or myo-insolitol and it's uses for depression/bipolar? Would be great if it actually worked (damn you, st. johns wort).

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For subjects outside of IT and related fields, at best Wikipedia is edited more by interested laypersons than by professionals. At worst, crackpots with an axe to grind and companies with a product to sell are also trying their hand at it.

Patients suffering from [link=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinical_depression" target="_blank]clinical depression[/link] generally have decreased levels of inositol in their [link=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerebrospinal_fluid" target="_blank]cerebrospinal fluid[/link].

"Clinical depression" is generally attributed to abnormal transmission in any or all of three neurotransmitter systems. None of them are inositol ; none of them degrade to inositol, and none are synthesized from it. So why was someone performing spinal taps on depressed patients to measure inositol levels and what were they compared to? Because they could?

Myo-inositol has been found in a single double-blind study to significantly reduce the symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) with effectiveness equal to SSRIs and virtually without side-effects.[7]

In a double-blind, controlled trial, myo-inositol was superior to fluvoxamine for decreasing the number of panic attacks and had fewer side effects.[8]

A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of depressed patients showed that a high dose of inositol (12 grams daily) resulted in significant improvement of symptoms, with no changes noted in liver, kidney, or hematological function.[6]

With each disorder listed, only one study identified. That's very much NOT promising. These single trials are also very unlikely to turn up the real extent of side effects and complications that the hundreds of clinical trials of SSRIs have. Aside from that, it can take months or years before liver or kidney impairment become evident.

As a placebo, you could probably do worse (though I'm not familiar with inositol's toxicity in overdose, and high-dose B vitamins usually have nontrivial effects) However, if it's a matter of you being determined not to take a pharmaceutical antidepressant, your best remaining choices are a proper balanced diet, good sleep hygiene, regular exercise, and therapy.

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Wow, I guess you've never taken it, then.

I dunno. I'm still looking for something natural to combat depression. I mean, there are dozens if not hundreds of antidepressant medications, and we're all still here trying to dig through them to find the best fit. Why NOT inositol? Can't hurt (like the headaches from St. John's wort, right).

I found out some other stuff on it...like that's it referred to as Vitamin B8. So I went to my vitamin collection and looked at B-complex, and, strangely B-8 is missing among the B-xs. Then another site mentioned to *always* take inositol with B-complex.

The plot thickened.

So, more searching and then it turns out lecithin IS inositol (with choline). Why is lecithin sound familiar? Cause it's mostly like egg yolk (according to wikipedia) along with other natural sources. But, you apparently need 12grams or more (of inositol, not lecithin or egg) to make it work. I'm not about to eat enough eggs to get that sort of dosage, but I can take a supplement. I have a feeling a few dozen egg yolks would be good for depression, just not so great for cholestorol and flatuation.

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Wow, I guess you've never taken it, then.

Nope. I've run across other mentions of it and wasn't impressed enough to spend my money.

I dunno. I'm still looking for something natural to combat depression. I mean, there are dozens if not hundreds of antidepressant medications, and we're all still here trying to dig through them to find the best fit. Why NOT inositol? Can't hurt (like the headaches from St. John's wort, right).

Some vitamins and amino acids really can hurt you in large doses (A, D, tyrosine) while others are just wasted (riboflavin - excess goes straight to urine.) I honestly do not know where inositol fits in that spectrum.

So, more searching and then it turns out lecithin IS inositol (with choline). Why is lecithin sound familiar? Cause it's mostly like egg yolk (according to wikipedia) along with other natural sources. But, you apparently need 12grams or more (of inositol, not lecithin or egg) to make it work. I'm not about to eat enough eggs to get that sort of dosage, but I can take a supplement. I have a feeling a few dozen egg yolks would be good for depression, just not so great for cholestorol and flatuation.

However, choline is a building block for acetylcholine; cholesterol is used (along w/sunlight) to produce vitamin D ... aside from being a prime component of brain tissue. Those are good things. Eggs are also a good source of nondairy protein and dietary sulfur. 60+ million years worth of egg-sucking mammalian evolution can't be *all* wrong.

Usually megadose supplements are used to get past poor absorption from nondietary sources. That's where the "balanced diet" comes in. You might see some improvement from adding one or two eggs a day to your diet, as long as you don't swamp your body's ability to use the excess cholesterol and protein. (Oddly enough, though I rarely do it I do feel better on days when I have an omelet for breakfast)

Beyond that, research more about lecithin. You may get more bang from your supplement buck.

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There are nearly 25 substances that have been given "Bx" nomenclature at one time or another, because they were thought to be vitamins but later proved not to be vitamins in humans, though some are vitamins in other animals. Inositol "B8" is apparently one of them.

I guess it sounds more legitimate when people call it B8.

a.m.

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I consider Lithium, Lamictal and Inositol to be essential to my treatment. I also find them to offer a synergistic effect that could not be achieved with any of the seven other possibilities.

Speaking of which, I've skipped a couple of nights of the Inositol, and it is starting to show. The only real reason I skip it is because of the flushing feeling and "suffocating" feeling experienced for about twenty to sixty minutes after taking it. If I'm asleep, I don't notice these. Keep in mind, though, that I take a large dose of Inositol, and that is undoubtedly responsible for the intensity of these effects.

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hi,

for some strange reason, i decided to look at the list of ingredients in one of my brother's "energy" drinks. and "inositol" was listed. i never heard of it until this thread. so i learned something new.

and no, i did not taste my brother's drink. i have enough energy at 3 am for 5 people...i guess that means time to take my night meds.

db

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  • 3 weeks later...

I don't know about dosages, but I've read that studies on inositol and OCD show that inositol is just as good as the SSRIs. I haven't tried it myself, but one must also be careful with "natural" treatments, because they, too, can have serious consequences if you don't know what you're doing.

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doesn't anyone with OCD know that inositol in high dosages can really help OCD? Isn't anyone listening? I live with a man with OCPD but he won't do anything.....hn

Merged with the recent topic on inositol.

It helps to check out what's being discussed before lecturing others about "not listening"

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There's this study, and it requires an awfully large dose of Inositol...

Controlled trials of inositol in psychiatry

by

Levine J

Ministry of Health Mental Health Center,

Faculty of Health Sciences,

Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beersheva, Israel

Eur Neuropsychopharmacol, 1997 May, 7:2, 147-55

ABSTRACT

Inositol is a simple polyol precursor in a second messenger system important in the brain. Cerebrospinal fluid inositol has been reported as decreased in depression. A double-blind controlled trial of 12 g daily of inositol in 28 depressed patients for four weeks was performed. Significant overall benefit for inositol compared to placebo was found at week 4 on the Hamilton Depression Scale. No changes were noted in hematology, kidney or liver function. Since many antidepressants are effective in panic disorder, twenty-one patients with panic disorder with or without agoraphobia completed a double-blind, placebo-controlled, four week, random-assignment crossover treatment trial of inositol 12 g per day. Frequency and severity of panic attacks and severity of agoraphobia declined significantly with inositol compared to placebo. Side-effects were minimal. Since serotonin re-uptake inhibitors benefit obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and inositol is reported to reverse desensitization of serotonin receptors, thirteen patients with OCD completed a double-blind controlled crossover trial of 18 g inositol or placebo for six weeks each. Inositol significantly reduced scores of OCD symptoms compared with placebo. A controlled double-blind crossover trial of 12 g daily of inositol for a month in twelve anergic schizophrenic patients, did not show any beneficial effects. A double-blind controlled crossover trial of 6 g of inositol daily vs. glucose for one month each was carried out in eleven Alzheimer patients, with on clearly significant therapeutic effects. Antidepressant drugs have been reported to improve attention deficit disorder (ADDH) with hyperactivity symptomatology. We studied oral inositol in children with ADDH in a double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled manner. Eleven children, mean age 8.9 +/- 3.6 years were enrolled in an eight week trial of inositol or placebo at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. Results show a trend for aggravation of the syndrome with myo-inositol as compared to placebo. Recent studies suggest that serotonin re-uptake inhibitors are helpful in at least some symptoms of autism. However a controlled double-blind crossover trial of inositol 200 mg/kg per day showed no benefit in nine children with autism. Cholinergic agonists have been reported to ameliorate electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)-induced memory impairment. Inositol metabolism is involved in the second messenger system for several muscarinic cholinergic receptors. Inositol 6 g daily was given in a crossover-double-blind manner for five days before the fifth or sixth ECT to a series of twelve patients, without effect. These results suggest that inositol has therapeutic effects in the spectrum of illness responsive to serotonin selective re-uptake inhibitors, including depression, panic and OCD, and is not beneficial in schizophrenia, Alzheimer's ADDH, autism or ECT-induced cognitive impairment.

Then there's this...

(PubMed)A large body of evidence suggests that the neuropathology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) lies in the complex neurotransmitter network of the cortico-striatal-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuit, where dopamine (DA), serotonin (5HT), glutamate (Glu), and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) dysfunction have been implicated in the disorder. Chronic inositol has been found to be effective in specific disorders that respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), including OCD, panic, and depression. This selective mechanism of action is obscure. Since nigro-striatal DA tracts are subject to 5HT(2) heteroreceptor regulation, one possible mechanism of inositol in OCD may involve its effects on inositol-dependent receptors, especially the 5HT(2) receptor, and a resulting effect on DA pathways in the striatum. In order to investigate this possible interaction, we exposed guinea pigs to oral inositol (1.2 g/kg) for 12 weeks. Subsequently, effects on locomotor behavior (LB) and stereotype behavior (SB), together with possible changes to striatal 5HT(2) and D(2) receptor function, were determined. In addition, the effects of chronic inositol on dexamphetamine (DEX)-induced motor behavior were evaluated. Acute DEX (3 mg/kg, ip) induced a significant increase in both SB and LB, while chronic inositol alone did not modify LA or SB. The behavioral response to DEX was also not modified by chronic inositol pretreatment. However, chronic inositol induced a significant increase in striatal D(2) receptor density (B(max)) with a slight, albeit insignificant, increase in 5HT(2) receptor density. This suggests that D(2) receptor upregulation may play an important role in the behavioral effects of inositol although the role of the 5HT(2) receptor in this response is questionable.

And that's not good if you have ADHD, the goal is to reduce striatal d2 receptors not increase.

Regarding Bipolar and Inositol...

Temporal dissociation between lithium-induced changes in frontal lobe myo-inositol and clinical response in manic-depressive illness by Moore GJ, Bebchuk JM, Parrish JK, Faulk MW, Arfken CL, Strahl-Bevacqua J, Manji HK

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences,

Wayne State University School of Medicine,

Detroit, MI 48201, USA.

gjmoore@med.wayne.edu

Am J Psychiatry 1999 Dec; 156(12):1902-8

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The most widely accepted hypothesis regarding the mechanism underlying lithium's therapeutic efficacy in manic-depressive illness (bipolar affective disorder) is the inositol depletion hypothesis, which posits that lithium produces a lowering of myo-inositol in critical areas of the brain and the effect is therapeutic. Lithium's effects on in vivo brain myo-inositol levels were investigated longitudinally in 12 adult depressed patients with manic-depressive illness. METHOD: Medication washout (minimum 2 weeks) and lithium administration were conducted in a blinded manner. Regional brain myo-inositol levels were measured by means of quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at three time points: at baseline and after acute (5-7 days) and chronic (3-4 weeks) lithium administration. RESULTS: Significant decreases (approximately 30%) in myoinositol levels were observed in the right frontal lobe after short-term administration, and these decreases persisted with chronic treatment. The severity of depression measured by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale also decreased significantly over the study. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that lithium administration does reduce myo-inositol levels in the right frontal lobe of patients with manic-depressive illness. However, the acute myo-inositol reduction occurs at a time when the patient's clinical state is clearly unchanged. Thus, the short-term reduction of myo-inositol per se is not associated with therapeutic response and does not support the inositol depletion hypothesis as originally posited. The hypothesis that a short-term lowering of myo inositol results in a cascade of secondary signaling and gene expression changes in the CNS that are ultimately associated with lithium's therapeutic efficacy is under investigation.

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Guest Becky

My husband has OCD and depression. He was taking Zyprexa and it caused him to have chemical hepatatis. I decided it was time to look for something natural. Came across a lot on Insolitol. He started taking it and it took a two or three weeks but it took effect. It works great for him. He has been better than he has ever been since I have known him (17 years). He stopped taking it for a short time because he did not want to spend the money. I didn't know those but I could tell withing about a week that something was not right. I thought it was time to increase his dosage but that is when he told me that he stopped taking it. He is now also convinced on Insolitol working. Hopefully, it will continue. Good luck. I hope it works on everybody else like it worked on my husband.

edit...eh, crud. There is a post in this forum on this already. But it's a few years old. Any new experiences?

I happened to run into this interesting vitamin/nutrient, inositol, while researching thermogenic diets. One of the links goes to wiki, here:

Insolitol Wiki

excerpt from under Pyschiatric Conditions section of the article...

--------------

Patients suffering from [link=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clinical_depression" target="_blank]clinical depression[/link] generally have decreased levels of inositol in their [link=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerebrospinal_fluid" target="_blank]cerebrospinal fluid[/link].

Myo-inositol has been found in a single double-blind study to significantly reduce the symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) with effectiveness equal to SSRIs and virtually without side-effects.[7] In a double-blind, controlled trial, myo-inositol was superior to fluvoxamine for decreasing the number of panic attacks and had fewer side effects.[8] A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of depressed patients showed that a high dose of inositol (12 grams daily) resulted in significant improvement of symptoms, with no changes noted in liver, kidney, or hematological function.[6]

--------------

Here is the reference[6] link & article from above...

Inositol as a treatment for psychiatric disorders:

Has anyone heard of inositol or myo-insolitol and it's uses for depression/bipolar? Would be great if it actually worked (damn you, st. johns wort).

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My husband has OCD and depression. He was taking Zyprexa and it caused him to have chemical hepatatis. I decided it was time to look for something natural.

That does not make sense. Zyprexa is an atypical antipsychotic, and really it's used in treating schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Even if it helps OCD symptoms for some people, it's not an antidepressant. What you should have done was look for another doctor if you don't agree with the treatment plan or the diagnosis, whether it's your husband, child, or pet eggplant (Preferably before liver damage, but hindsight is so often 20/20 at all distances)

The most positive reports anyone's dug up about inositol rate its action similar to a weak serotonergic antidepressant, and mostly at rather high doses. For depression + OCD requiring medical treatment, inositol isn't going to be as effective as a generic SSRI for most people and it will be far more expensive.

We studied oral inositol in children with ADDH in a double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled manner. Eleven children, mean age 8.9 +/- 3.6 years were enrolled in an eight week trial of inositol or placebo at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. Results show a trend for aggravation of the syndrome with myo-inositol as compared to placebo.

And this stuff can actually make ADHD worse? That's not that common an effect.

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learned my lesson the hard way with herbs and natural stuff, dont remember the name of the herb, but it was suppose to calm you, etc..i went into a major depression in just 2 days..and i know that shit had something to do with it..wasnt what your talking about..i got it at gnc--i'll never by another supplement--if its not a script from my doc, its useless.IMO

sounds like some people here have an interest in the product by pushing it so hard, sad when your fucking with people that are so desperate to get well

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And this stuff can actually make ADHD worse? That's not that common an effect.

It increases striatal d2 receptors, in ADHD there's an overabundance of D2 receptors. In more naturally euphoric/happy people they too have increased d2 receptors.

So, if you're hyper and you know it don't use Inositol and don't have a diet high in foods containing it.

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And this stuff can actually make ADHD worse? That's not that common an effect.

It increases striatal d2 receptors, in ADHD there's an overabundance of D2 receptors.

That still hasn't been proven. (Dev Med Child Neurol. 2001 Nov;43(11):755-60.) Higher baseline D2 availability (not the same thing as abundance) has been correlated to stimulant response, but not only is that not the final word on ADHD mechanisms, it doesn't explain why purely dopaminergic drugs haven't been useful while moderate success has been obtained with noradrenergic meds. In fact, since they were looking at initial uptake prior to stimulant treatment and uptake post-treatment, the data could just as easily be pointing to a greater percentage of unoccupied/depleted receptors - which would indicate inadequate dopamine transport, excessive clearance, or inadequate dopamine release or a combination of all of the above.

Other research summaries, (Eisenberg DTA, MacKillop J, Modi M, Beauchemin J, Dang D, Lisman SA, Lum JK, Wilson DS: Examining Impulsivity as an Endophenotype Using a Behavioral Approach: A DRD2 TaqI A and DRD4 48-bp VNTR Association Study.Behavioral and Brain Functions 2007., 3(2) ) find DRD4 more influential than DRD2 in the prefrontal cortex, which is the locus for executive function (markedly impaired in ADHD)

In more naturally euphoric/happy people they too have increased d2 receptors.

The two most common comorbid conditions you'll see around here (with ADHD) are major depression and bipolar disorder, NOT the groups more commonly considered "naturally euphoric/happy"

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